Plantzilla

Plantzilla

Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher / Jun 20, 2019

Plantzilla Mortimer Henryson loves Plantzilla the plant he s been taking care of all year in his third grade classroom He loves him so much he takes him home for summer vacation What could go wrong with a plan

  • Title: Plantzilla
  • Author: Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher
  • ISBN: 9780152053925
  • Page: 477
  • Format: Paperback
  • Mortimer Henryson loves Plantzilla, the plant he s been taking care of all year in his third grade classroom He loves him so much, he takes him home for summer vacation What could go wrong with a plant But life in the Henryson household soon takes a strange turn A pot roast disappears, then steaks from the grill and where has Mrs Henryson s prize Chihuahua goneMortimer Henryson loves Plantzilla, the plant he s been taking care of all year in his third grade classroom He loves him so much, he takes him home for summer vacation What could go wrong with a plant But life in the Henryson household soon takes a strange turn A pot roast disappears, then steaks from the grill and where has Mrs Henryson s prize Chihuahua gone In this hilarious story told ingeniously through letters, Jerdine Nolen and David Catrow team up to show that when there s enough love, even the most unlikely character can become part of a family.

    Plantzilla Jerdine Nolen, Brian Keliher, David Catrow Plantzilla Jerdine Nolen, Brian Keliher, David Catrow on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Mortimer Henryson loves Plantzilla, the plant he s been taking care of all year in his third grade classroom He loves him so much I Like Myself by Karen Beaumont, David Catrow A criminal conspiracy is selling America s vital secrets one unlikely duo stands in their way. Brother Eagle, Sister Sky Susan Jeffers Brother Eagle, Sister Sky Susan Jeffers on FREE shipping on qualifying offers How can you buy the sky How can you own the rain and the wind So begin the moving words attributed to a great American Indian chief Chief Seattle over years ago They are words that eloquently capture the central belief of Native Americans that this earth and every creature on it is sacred. kangcom Ongoing advances in Solar System exploration continue to reveal its splendour and diversity in remarkable detail This undergraduate level textbook presents fascinating descriptions and colour images

    • ✓ Plantzilla || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher
      477 Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Plantzilla || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher
      Posted by:Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher
      Published :2018-012-16T18:52:45+00:00

    About "Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher"

      • Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher

        Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Plantzilla book, this is one of the most wanted Jerdine Nolen David Catrow Brian Keliher author readers around the world.


    666 Comments

    1. Mortimer has been taking care of a plant at school the students have dubbed "plantzilla." He wants to be the one to adopt it for the summer and take care of it. It all works out, but then Plantzilla starts eating strange things - like meat. then the problems start. Told in a series of letters between Mortimer's house and his teacher. David Catrow did the illustrations and signed my book "i hope the book grows on you." It did and it will continue to do so.


    2. I'll admit that the premise is a bit absurd, but the story is fun and all done in letter-form which can be equally interesting. The illustrations really carried the book for me. I enjoyed the extra content that examining each page offered. In addition to the text, there was a entire sub-plot on every page. David Catrow always does great work like that. This was a very funny, enjoyable story.


    3. A very entertaining book about mutant plants; this one is suited for grades 3-6, as several pages are written in cursive. Unique feature: The plant is sentient.Genre: Fantasy (Real genre: Horror/Humor)


    4. This book is wonderful! I wish it came out when I was a child! The greatest thing is that the book is written entirely in corresponding letters. There are three rotating characters:child, teacher, and parents. The writing of the letters change depending upon who is writing. I love that the writing matches the characters. This book is a great opportunity to teach letter writing in the classroom, as well as formal correspondence. Due to the influx of technology, letter writing is really not taught [...]


    5. Think "Little Shop of Horrors" for the picture book set. Plantzilla is cleverly narrated in letters, as a family learns to cope with an enormous, anthropomorphic houseplant that takes over their home. The plant goes from frightening to a member of the family over the course of the tale.Veg*n families note: Unlike most houseplants, this one boasts a craving for meat, and wrecks havoc at barbecues as its tendrils are shown clutching giant steaks, along with burgers, hot dogs, etc. The text also im [...]


    6. Mortimer Henryson is very fond of Plantzilla, one of the plants in his classroom. When summer is approaching he petitions his teacher for permission to care for Plantzilla at his home. Mr. Lester, the science teacher, agrees. However, Mortimers' family quickly realizes that Plantzilla is not a normal plant, in fact, he eats meat! When the family dog disappears, Mortimer's mother becomes frantic and declares the plant must go. But then Plantzilla finally blooms and settles down. Mortimer is ecsta [...]


    7. Plantzilla would be a perfect book for a young student who loves the environment and connecting classroom learning to outdoor activities. The young boy becomes attached to the plant because he felt he was the one who took the most care of it in the classroom and requested to keep in during summer vacation and even with some problems, the family loves having the plant. The fantasy of the book also gives children curiosity and test and to see how they could relate to some of the plants in their ho [...]


    8. A boy and his family send letters back and forth to the boy's science teacher in regards to the plant the boy became attached to during the schoolyear and wishes to care for during the summer. The plant is capable of many things and for a moment it's even suspected of committing villainous acts in the neighborhood. All ends well, though, with an ending that's wide open for a sequel.Too lengthy for a read aloud. Zany artwork perfectly captures the tone of the story and makes Plantzilla a pretty l [...]


    9. This was delightful little book that my granddaughter and I read together. It was the perfect bedtime story. The teacher read this to my granddaughter's class and then my granddaughter brought it home for another read. The story was cute and told in a series of letter to and from the main character, his mother, the teacher, and one other but that would be a spoiler. The illustrations were rich, complex and funny too. I laughed with each page turn. Highly recommend this book to elementary school [...]


    10. Mortimer brings the class plant home for summer vacation. It turns out that Plantzilla is not just any old plant though -- he eats meat, develops a mouth, and shows his unplant-like personality. The story is told through letters written by Mortimer, Mortimer's mother, and Mortimer's teacher. The letters from Mortmer's mother were most challenging for my students. The cursive handwriting is fairly small and slanted and the vocabulary is much higher than that of third grader Mortimer's. A great fi [...]


    11. Mortimer Henryson takes the class plant home for the summer. The summer is a great success until a roast beef and the neighbor's dog disappears.This book would be a great introductory book for talking about plants and their characteristics. It talks about the plant needing sunlight, water and oxygen. Then it explains what cilia is and the metamorphosis that takes place when the plant gets human characteristics. The age range appropriate for this book is 1st grade-5th grade.


    12. This book could have easily been made into a chapter book. I think the younger children will enjoy the book if their parents read it to them, maybe a couple of pages a night. The story is awesome. You can totally see this kid becoming more and more obsessed with the plant. The plant even wins over the parents affection in the end. The illustrations are really cool. It was a very fun story to read.


    13. Genre: Fantasy/Sci-FiAwards: NoneGrade Level: K-2This book will be a fun book to read to my students. It will lead me into a discussion about what it takes to keep plants alive and will introduce the concept of writing a friendly letter. For a follow up activity I will have the students write their own letter asking the teacher for the opportunity to keep Plantzilla for the summer. Once they have finished I will ask the students to read their letter to the class.


    14. Plantzilla grabs you from the first page and never lets go! I love that the story is told in letter form!For you young people letters are pieces of paper people actually sit down and take the time to write. Then the letters are addressed and sent off my mail. Not email - real mail.A wonderful story with whimsical illustrations. This story proves that everyone can have a green thumb as long as they also have a full heart!


    15. This is a fun story about a "Little Shop of Horrors" kind of plant that is adopted by a family. The story is a series of correspondence between the family and the teacher who gave them the plant. The illustrations are wonderful, as we expected, and the way that the plant overwhelms the family's life is very humorous (especially with the family dog). Overall, it's a hilarious tale, made even funnier by the illustrations. We really enjoyed reading it together.


    16. I wasn't sure how this book was going to end, because it seemed kind of random and just slightly disturbing. But I was happy to see that things worked out in the end and that nothing drastic happened. I loved the colorful illustrations and the vivid characteristics of the plant. Although, this book was strange, I might recommend.*Taken from my book reviews blog: reviewsatmse/2010


    17. I don't know if I get this book. It is supposed to be funny because I didn't think it was. It is about the class plant the kids wants to take home for the summer. He gets permission to take it home and it grows and grows and grows and starts taking over the house, eating the pets etc. I thought it was kinda a stupid story but I am also not a little boy!


    18. What an original, humurous and fun story. The illustrations are equally delighful and could add another 5 stars on thier own!!The book is actually a series of letters written mostly by a child named Mortimer, who greatly desires to take care of Plantzilla during summer vacation.Plantzilla is not your ordinary plant and Mortimers grand affection for the feisty plant is obvious.


    19. This is the story of a 3rd grader who takes home Plantzilla to care for it over the summer. The funny story is told through letters exchanged by Mortimer, his mother and his teacher. The illustrations have a lot of details and do a lot to tell the story. This book would work for students between 2nd and 4th grade.


    20. Jerdine Nolen wrote a very cute, imaginative story with likeable characters and engaging text delivered through a series of letters between the loveable Mortimer Henryson, his parents, his teacher and eventually Plantzilla but oops that was a little bit of a spoiler!Not to mention, you can never go wrong with David Catrow as the illustrator. He is one of my favorites!


    21. Mortimer LOVES the plant he was in charge of taking care while he was in school, so he persuades the teacher to let him take the plant for the summer. Through a series of letters from Mortimer, his mother, and Mr. Lester (the teacher) we learn how Plantzilla grows and integrates himself into the family.Great, fabulous illustrations.


    22. Most kids are swimming and playing in the sun during the summer but not Mortimer Henryson he offers to care for the class plant “Plantzilla” for the summer. The story is told by letters sent back in forth from Mortimer and his parents to his teacher. It has wonderful pictures and is a great story about not judging a book or a plant by its cover.


    23. Fun book! I love the illustrator, David Catrow, who always does an amazing job of making books more fun to read to kids: the great facial expressions and extra stuff going on that always add to the text, whomever the author is!


    24. The story is told in a series of letters back and forth from a teacher and his student's family who adopt a plant for the summer. The plant grows huge and becomes a part of the family. Cute, humorous illustrations.


    25. David Catrow is my favorite illustrator. He takes even the most mundane books and makes them awesome with his funny and colorful illustrations. This book of letters about the keeping of a peculiar plant over the summer is made by the illustrations.


    26. A fabulous book with a "Little Shop of Horrors" leaning. But, don't worry parents, it all works out in the end for a positive outcome. The highest praise our family gives a book is that we would want to have it in our personal library. And, this is one of those books.


    27. Plantzilla by Jerdine Harold is a funny story that can be used to teach students about plants. I would use this book to teach students a science lesson on the life cycle of plants and about the different types of plants there are. I would use this book in grades 1st-4th grade.


    28. I read this book to introduce carnivorous plants to my first graders. I chose sections because this book is a little advanced for first grade, but they loved it. We are going use a venus flytrap for one of my science learning stations. I cannot wait!


    29. "When you give a living thing love, you never know where it will lead." A family takes a plant home for the summer and it really "grows on them". Fabulous illustrations in which students can spot the missing chihuahua on almost every page. Fun stuff


    30. In a series of letters a boy, his science teacher, and his parents discuss the progress of a very unusual, sometimes frightening, plant that becomes more human as the summer progresses.hcpl


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