The Ecological Thought

The Ecological Thought

Timothy Morton / Aug 20, 2019

The Ecological Thought In this passionate lucid and surprising book Timothy Morton argues that all forms of life are connected in a vast entangling mesh This interconnectedness penetrates all dimensions of life No being

  • Title: The Ecological Thought
  • Author: Timothy Morton
  • ISBN: 9780674049208
  • Page: 475
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In this passionate, lucid, and surprising book, Timothy Morton argues that all forms of life are connected in a vast, entangling mesh This interconnectedness penetrates all dimensions of life No being, construct, or object can exist independently from the ecological entanglement, Morton contends, nor does Nature exist as an entity separate from the uglier or synthIn this passionate, lucid, and surprising book, Timothy Morton argues that all forms of life are connected in a vast, entangling mesh This interconnectedness penetrates all dimensions of life No being, construct, or object can exist independently from the ecological entanglement, Morton contends, nor does Nature exist as an entity separate from the uglier or synthetic elements of life Realizing this interconnectedness is what Morton calls the ecological thought.In three concise chapters, Morton investigates the profound philosophical, political, and aesthetic implications of the fact that all life forms are interconnected As a work of environmental philosophy and theory, The Ecological Thought explores an emerging awareness of ecological reality in an age of global warming Using Darwin and contemporary discoveries in life sciences as root texts, Morton describes a mesh of deeply interconnected life forms intimate, strange, and lacking fixed identity.A prequel to his Ecology without Nature Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics Harvard, 2007 , The Ecological Thought is an engaged and accessible work that will challenge the thinking of readers in disciplines ranging from critical theory to Romanticism to cultural geography.

    The Ecological Thought Timothy Morton The prequel of Ecology without Nature, The Ecological Thought, written by Timothy Morton, is a book that essentially talks about an idea of thinking ecologically towards any beings, matters or objects that exist in a gigantic, entangling mesh. The Ecological Thought Timothy Morton Harvard The Ecological Thought A prequel to his Ecology without Nature Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics Harvard, , The Ecological Thought is an engaged and accessible work that will challenge the thinking of readers in disciplines ranging from critical theory to The Ecological Thought by Timothy Morton Community Reviews The opening paragraphs argument that the ecological thought isn t just about global warming, recycling, solar power, but has to do with compassion, curiosity, openness, sadness and tenderness, had me hooked Although Morton is sympathetic to posthumanism, he keeps sight of humankind, envisaging encounters, coexistence, compassion, The Ecological Thought Timothy Morton Harvard Morton s The Ecological Thought rejects the romantic concept of nature as a passive foil to human action Timothy Morton has a unique take on ecology that challenges much of the alternative consciousness that floats around on the periphery of environmental circles He offers a profound take on human possibilities. The Ecological Thought Kindle edition by Timothy Morton The Ecological Thought Kindle edition by Timothy Morton Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Ecological Thought. The Ecological Thought Timothy Morton Apr , The Ecological Thought This interconnectedness penetrates all dimensions of life No being, construct, or object can exist independently from the ecological entanglement, Morton contends, nor does Nature exist as an entity separate from the uglier or synthetic elements of life. Tim Morton, The Ecological Thought Tim Morton, The Ecological Thought Cambridge, MA Harvard University Press, pages Peter Gratton University of San Diego In this sense, The Ecological Thought, as the title itself suggests, lays the theoretical ground that the earlier work had put into practice. The Ecological Thought Times Higher Education THE Aug , There is an interesting book to be written about Adorno s importance for ecological thought, but it would not be one dedicated to the idea that you can have ecology without nature While I am sure that many readers will benefit from the challenge of reading Morton, I The ecological thought eBook, WorldCat The ecological thought Timothy Morton The author argues that all forms of life are interconnected and that no being, construct, or object can exist independently from the ecological entanglement, nor does nature exist as an entity ECOLOGY WITHOUT NATURE The Ecological Thought Jan , The Ecological Thought Happy new year I just saw that The Ecological Thought, which I always think of as ET, just surpassed citations Thanks people You really should read it It s the philosophical backbone of the way I like to think It s my shortest book even Realist Magic is a bit longer I wrote it in pages and just kept adding

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        Timothy Morton Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Ecological Thought book, this is one of the most wanted Timothy Morton author readers around the world.


    297 Comments

    1. "The position of hunting for anthropocentrism is anthropocentrism. To claim that someone's distinction of animals and humans is anthropocentric, because she privileges reason over passion, is to deny reason to nonhumans. We can't in good faith cancel the difference between humans and nonhumans. Nor can we preserve it" (76)A nonsystematic, brisk, aphoristic "prequel" to Ecology without Nature. Morton's been adopted by the object-oriented ontologists, for good reason, although it's hard to tell wh [...]


    2. Some great writing in here, but you do probably need to be a practised humanities reader to get the most out of it.Central thesis is something like; We need to let go the idea of 'natural' in order to understand our deeply embedded place in the ecological 'mesh'. It's kinda about ooze and animal and hybrid as opposed to national parks and looking after birds.This is not a book that is like those 'one idea expanded to 200 pages' non-fiction 'ideas' books. Also it is not a straight out philosophy [...]


    3. You know that idea that you had when you were a kid about spiderwebs, or anthills, or beaver dams? That one where you paused and thought, "If spiders build spiderwebs, and we build houses, aren't houses a part of nature too?" and then after you thought that the line between Nature and non-nature got all blurry? This book is about that concept.


    4. I was inspired to look for Timothy Morton’s books in the library catalogue after reading this interview with him. ‘The Ecological Thought’ is very different to the usual sort of books I read about environmental disaster; much more abstract and philosophical. In it, Morton presents a number of new concepts, including the Mesh (an interconnectedness of all things, essentially), the Strange Stranger (a personification of the Other, I think), and hyperobjects (human creations that will vastly [...]


    5. By no means, ever, buy this book. I think the ideas in it are important, and had I been able to finish reading it, I would on the whole probably have agreed with most if not all of them, but the writing is so exceedingly poor that it makes me want to punch the author in the face. Metaphorically, of course, because I am not a violent man. Metaphorically, and repeatedly.Never mind that Wall-E and Blade Runner seem to be the author's central sources of inspiration, never mind that pretty much half [...]


    6. I'll have to disagree with the 'lucid' assessment of the page review. There are some excellent ideas scattered throughout the essays, yet I found the text to be a little too incoherent to absorb. It reads like a brilliant lecture drunkenly delivered late at night by your favorite professor. So, if you are into that, go for it. I only wish a skilled editor could get her hands on this and cut out the boozy quips.


    7. Great. This was for my Green Literature course and I can't wait to talk to Morton about the fact that thinking deeply and ecologically are necessarily separated from Nature. Some of my favorite points was the gender (masculinity/ femininity) of Nature. Also, the idea of hyper-object immortality. Either way, I am in the Mesh, I am the Mesh.


    8. Great book to think with. I enjoyed Morton's playful style, his irony, and compassionate care. The opening paragraphs' argument that the ecological thought isn't just about global warming, recycling, solar power, but has to do with compassion, curiosity, openness, sadness and tenderness, had me hooked. Although Morton is sympathetic to posthumanism, he keeps sight of humankind, envisaging encounters, coexistence, compassion, even love, between strange strangers in the mesh. Ecocritical readings [...]


    9. Many brilliant moments here, but Morton remains at his best in the essay format, where many of these ideas have been expressed more vividly and succinctly.


    10. This is truly an important piece of writing. Morton's voice comes across so well even though he's describing some of the most complicated ideas about ongoing problems that are still considered controversial. I love the new perspectives and phrases he introduces about topics that get cold-shouldered. Looking forward to reading this again and sponging even more of it.


    11. Tim Morton, a thinker specialist in ecology, author of preceding book Ecology without Nature. Tim Morton also contributes to magazines of architecture on various topics related to ecology, objects, interdependency. The Ecological Thought articulates three major topics: the Mesh (or interdependency), the Strange Stranger (still a bit confusing for me) and hyperobjects (I'm looking forward to reading his upcoming book).The reader of Jane Bennett, Graham Harman, Ray Brassier, Bruno Latour, John Pro [...]


    12. I wish I could say this was engaging, but clarity isn't something that's sought here. It's like watching words pile up around a central question until it becomes almost impossible to see through them. And yet, and yet, he's on to something, namely, the heartbreak of living in a time of extinction.He reminds me of Marshall Mcluhan, who wrote hard-to-read books about the media, designed not to espouse some personal topography , but more to open our eyes to the truth. Break it to us gently, perhaps [...]


    13. This was one of the most interesting and readable theoretical texts I have read so far in grad school. Morton's writing is clear and explicative. He uses relevant analogies and metaphors to make this relatable. The ideas I found most relevant for me were: the mesh, the strange stranger, ecological thought vs. environmental thought, and similarities, rather than differences as frightening.


    14. Morton uses the movie Grizzly Man as a metaphor in his book, and I believe it is apt. Morton himself tries to live among his cute koans only to be devoured by them in the end.This book is gibberish.




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