Ed Gein: Psycho

Ed Gein: Psycho

Paul Anthony Woods / Sep 16, 2019

Ed Gein Psycho America may have had its fill of psychos for the last forty years but no serial killer has inspired so many books and films Pyscho The Silence of the Lambs The Texas Chainsaw Massacre as Wisconsin

  • Title: Ed Gein: Psycho
  • Author: Paul Anthony Woods
  • ISBN: 9780312130572
  • Page: 294
  • Format: Paperback
  • America may have had its fill of psychos for the last forty years, but no serial killer has inspired so many books and films Pyscho, The Silence of the Lambs, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre as Wisconsin s cannibalistic handyman murderer, Ed Gein None of them has been used as the ultimate ogre in countless children s stories and off color jokes, and none of them has been foAmerica may have had its fill of psychos for the last forty years, but no serial killer has inspired so many books and films Pyscho, The Silence of the Lambs, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre as Wisconsin s cannibalistic handyman murderer, Ed Gein None of them has been used as the ultimate ogre in countless children s stories and off color jokes, and none of them has been found guilty of as many unspeakable atrocities as Ed Gein.Ed Gein Psycho is his story This is his legend.

    Ed Gein Psycho Paul Anthony Woods America may have had its fill of psychos for the last forty years, but none of them has inspired so many books and films Psycho, The Silence of the Lambs, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre as Wisconsin s cannibalistic handyman, Ed Gein. Ed Gein Early life Childhood Ed Gein was born in La Crosse County, Wisconsin, on August , , the second of two boys of George Philip Gein and Augusta Wilhelmine ne Lehrke Gein Gein had an older brother, Henry George Gein ED GEIN WISCONSIN S PSYCHO prairieghosts Ed Gein UPI WISCONSIN S PSYCHO The Deviant Life Times of Ed Gein A beautiful blond undresses and steps into the shower, only to be attacked a few moments later by a man in woman s clothing, who stabs her to death Real life Psycho Ed Gein dies HISTORY On July , , Ed Gein, a serial killer infamous for skinning human corpses, dies of complications from cancer in a Wisconsin prison at age Gein served as the inspiration for writer Robert Ed Gein Movies, Life Murders Biography Ed Gein was a notorious killer and grave robber His activities inspired the creation of some of film s most infamous characters, including Norman Bates of Psycho. Deviant The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original Deviant The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original Psycho Harold Schechter on FREE shipping on qualifying offers The truth behind the twisted crimes that inspired the films Psycho , The Texas Chain Saw Massacre Ed Gein Portrait of America s Original Psycho Killer Few convicted killers in the long, violent annals of American crime come close to Ed Gein for depravity and it should be said for pop culture influence Arrested in and tried and Digging Up Ed Gein Our Expedition to Plainfield, WI The graves of Ed Gein and his family in the Plainfield Cemetery After leaving the hardware store and neglecting to get that video I needed we set course for the Plainfield Cemetery, where the Gein family is buried amidst Ed s victims. Ed Gein Was A Serial Killer From Wisconsin Who Literally You may not have heard of Ed Gein, but you definitely know the stories that his twisted tale of murder and grave robbing inspired Although Gein only officially killed two people, his grave robbing hobby made for one of the most shocking police raids in history Ed Gein Rotten Tomatoes By day, Ed Gein was a quiet man who kept watch over the farm left to him by his late mother in Plainfield, a small rural community in Wisconsin.

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      Published :2018-011-25T08:23:48+00:00

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      • Paul Anthony Woods

        Paul Anthony Woods Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Ed Gein: Psycho book, this is one of the most wanted Paul Anthony Woods author readers around the world.


    899 Comments

    1. A true American legend! Most folks are familiar with the infamous deeds of Mr. Gein through their fictionalization in the movie psycho. This dude was crazy as a shit-house rat. Grave robbing, dismemberment, murder, cannibalism, wearing of the deceased skin. Talk about well-rounded psychosis! My personal favorite is that Eddie used to give his neighbors gifts of "venison" that I like to believe they gleefully ate without the slightest idea that they were dining on the local barmaid.


    2. Truth is stranger than fiction! Ed Gein was a true sicko, creepy, pervert. There are not enough words to describe his depravity. Think of the worst and he probably did it. He lived in the country with his father, mother and brother. Ed was very attached to his fanatically religious mother. His father died early, and after some years, his mother died. Ed seems to have killed his brother shortly after the mother's death. Ed bashed in his brother's head during a storm, and the investigation assumed [...]


    3. Book Review 4Tawsha Wohlrabe10/23/14Non-Fiction“Ed Gein Psycho”By: Paul Anthony WoodsI did not like the book “Ed Gein Psycho” by Paul Anthony Woods, because I had found the information quite disturbing. Even though some of the information was disturbing, it was interesting to learn the history behind what had happened. When I first started reading this book I had nightmares, and these days I am the one who barely gets scared of anything. Ed`s mother, Augusta, favored Ed and had put all o [...]


    4. Well really this is just a simple chatty book written by someone who evidently had more than a healthy passing interest in the serial killer Ed Gein. However, I also have more than a healthy passing interest in the serial killer Ed Gein so I found it a perfectly pleasant little read. However, Paul Anthony Woods is yet another writer who has trampled slack-jawed like a great retarded baboon over our loyal and useful friend the hyphen. As such, not only did I become an irritated reader but this is [...]


    5. If you are interested in the macabre side of life, this is the book for you. Ed Gein is the american psycho that inspired many horror movie stars, including Norman Bates from Bates Motel, Buffalo Bill from Silence of the Lambs, and Leatherface from Texas Chainsaw Massacre. By the characters that he inspired, you can tell what types of gruesome crimes he committed. The novel delves deep into a psychoanalysis of Mr. Gein, pointing fingers at his childhood environment, mental disabilities, but most [...]


    6. It worked for me more as a 'what was' instead of a true crime book. Dialogue was sort of thrown in to make it seem more plausible. However, while reading about Ed Gein you can kind of see 'why, how, and he done it for these reasons.' The whole background of the story which told of the crimes he committed was well handled. Kind of scary. Makes you think with the pictures involved. Isolationism was at it's worst. The only thing that sets it apart is the many things that came later. Throwing in how [...]


    7. The Ed Gein machine was one fucked up individual. I must say though, these new serial killers will never be as creative as the old school ones. Come on, he made all sorts of designer wear out of human skin and body parts and wore it to pranch around in. Evil sick bastard.This book was very informative until the last few chapters. It went into boring detail of what tv shows and movies were based off of his killings. Then preceded to describe scenes from the movie. What really saved the book was t [...]


    8. I have mixed feelings for this book. A part of me loves the weaving of this grotesque tale and the truth and insight into Gein's actions and mind. Another part of me is disappointed in how this reads more as a recounting of what happened versus more inclusion of forensic science and the psychology behind the mental ill becoming sickening murderers.I do suggest this for those who want to be creeped out and question humanity--is that person a psycho behind those innocent eyes? I'll let you decide [...]


    9. Mr. Woods delves deeply into the dark world of everyones favourite sicko, Ed Gein. This book is a sort of split into two, with the first half depicting the life of our anti-hero before and after he was caught. The research into his life is outstanding, bringing forth a chilling atmosphere to the reader. The second half of the book, outlines the various off shoots from the revelation of Ed's crimes. The chapters visit films such as Silence of the Lambs, Deranged, Psycho, Texas Chainsaw Massacre a [...]


    10. A review of the infamous serial killer's life, his murderous habits, and some insights into his behaviors, in the first half of the book. The second half of the book is devoted to the subculture that seems to have evolved around this man, including movies based, in part on his life, as well as several musical references and fan clubs. An interesting, but short read. I would have preferred more about the man himself than the cultural references, but that's just me. :)


    11. A rather fantastical account of a fascinating killer's life. A lot of the content is surely pure speculation. However it does fairly eliminate some of the crazier myths about old Ed. The conversational tone made this an easy read. The writer seems to be a massive fan of our psycho. Maybe need to read a more scientific examination of the case as a follow up.


    12. This was the most disappointing book I've come across so far. It actually made me mad just reading it. The author gave hardly any real information. Most of it was him making fun of Ed Gein, and then the last half of the book was stories that Ed influenced. If you want to learn anything of Ed Gein do not read this book.


    13. I enjoyed it a lot. Although it was things I learned about him many times before through documentaries, and internet research, it was still nice to have it all compiled into book from. I suggest it to anyone who has an interest in Ed Gein, or serial killers in general.


    14. The writing was an absolute joke. The book meanders through different pronouns and pet names that the author had for Gein. It isn't endearing. The only positive aspect of this review is the amount of detail given to Gein's demeanor and also the crime scene.


    15. I only made it through the first chapter, I thought the writing was fairly poor and it distracted me from the content. Plus, I find it hard to believe that the author had transcripts of dialog between the Gein family members. Is this a biography or historical fiction?


    16. What an AWFUL book. The cornpone writing style is just dumbfounding. It's chockfull of (bad) imagined dialogue, there are no citations given for anything, and Gein's victims are given zero respect. I've read a lot of true crime books and this is a slap in the face to the entire genre.



    17. The cool part about this book is the pop cultural slant it takes at the end; the influence that Gein had on movies, tv, and music.




    18. Well, what to say about this book?The content of Gein's activities and actual facts relating to the case are difficult to extract from the irritatingly conversational writing style. And the 'dialogues' taking place between Gein and his mother, and his victims are clearly invented and this leaves the reader finding it hard to take the rest of the book seriously. Given that this is the tale of one of the most infamous serial killers ever I believe that a more sombre tone would have made this a far [...]


    19. If Robert Bloch had incorporated more of what Ed Gein did into his Norman Bates character, Hitchcock wouldn't have made the film. Gein did far worse than any of the literary characters loosely based on him. If partials were available, I'd have gone 3.5 on this one, as the writing wasn't exemplary, but the facts of the story and his atrocities were shocking.Trust meI do not shock easily.


    20. Great story of a man who has abderanged personality. The book has dialogues which will bring your imagination deep into who Ed Gein was and what brought him to his addiction with skinning his victims and wearing it like a coutured clothing


    21. The part talking about Gein was great. The end was about everything inspired by Gein, and that sucked. I don't want to read about songs and movies. And to top it all off, it said Slayer is black metalwhich is more insane that Gein himself.


    22. Fascinating read, Gein's is a great study into the mind of supposedly normal people and the monsters that they can become.


    23. This review and more can be found at A Reader's Diary! I must say, I absolutely hated this book. While it was informative, it was also incredibly difficult to read; imagine a narrative research paper that is 160 pages long. Ed Gein was the inspiration for much of our horror pop culture, as well as many cult classics. He's best known for his skin suit, that he made from different women. He was obsessed with women, not because he want them but because he wanted to become them. However, many don't [...]


    24. I prefer any true crime books I read to be more factual and have fewer "imagined" conversations by the author. I also found it confusing that one paragraph would be in the third person, and the next would be written in the first person with no quotation marks to show the point-of-view changed. Several editing errors such as repeating words (and and, to to). And then the second half of the book was the author critiquing movies/songs inspired by Gein.


    25. I liked this book, but found myself skimming through towards the end (partly because the information was more about the world outside of Gein himself and I have lots of other books I'm dying to read). Gein was definately a psycho. It's always interesting to read about people like this.


    26. I don't normally give true crime novels 5 star ratings, but I really enjoyed this one. I wasn't just educated, I was entertained. The author's personality really comes out in this book, something I'm not used to in true crime novels.



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