She Wolves: The Notorious Queens of Medieval England

She Wolves: The Notorious Queens of Medieval England

Elizabeth Norton / Sep 21, 2019

She Wolves The Notorious Queens of Medieval England This history deals with the bad girls of England s medieval royal dynasties the queens who earned themselves a notorious reputation Some of them are well known and have been the subject of biography

  • Title: She Wolves: The Notorious Queens of Medieval England
  • Author: Elizabeth Norton
  • ISBN: 9780750947350
  • Page: 384
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This history deals with the bad girls of England s medieval royal dynasties, the queens who earned themselves a notorious reputation Some of them are well known and have been the subject of biography Eleanor of Aquitaine, Emma of Normandy, Isabella of France, and Anne Boleyn, for example while others have not been written about outside academic journals The appeal of theThis history deals with the bad girls of England s medieval royal dynasties, the queens who earned themselves a notorious reputation Some of them are well known and have been the subject of biography Eleanor of Aquitaine, Emma of Normandy, Isabella of France, and Anne Boleyn, for example while others have not been written about outside academic journals The appeal of these notorious queens, apart from their shared taste for witchcraft, murder, adultery, and incest, is that because they were notorious they attracted a great deal of attention during their lifetimes This study reveals much about the role of the medieval queen and the evolution of the role that led, ultimately, to the reign of Elizabeth I and a new concept of queenship.

    She Wolves The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth She Wolves is a superb history of the powerful women who have surrounded England s throne, combining blood drenched drama, politics, sex and swordplay with scholarly analysis, symptahy for the plight of women and elegant writing Simon Sebag Montefiore, Daily Telegraph London She Wolves The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth She Wolves is a much dynamic and pacey work on some of the strong willed and powerful queens that ruled England, compared to Lisa Hilton s Queens Consort though that, covering the entire medieval period rather than selected queens, is complete. She Wolves The Notorious Queens of Medieval England by She Wolves The Notorious Queens of Medieval England This history deals with the bad girls of England s medieval royal dynasties, the queens who earned themselves a notorious reputation Some of them are well known and have been the subject of biography Eleanor of Aquitaine, Emma of Normandy, Isabella of France, and Anne Boleyn, She Wolves The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth Most Helpful Customer Reviews In She Wolves, Helen Castor does not merely explore the lives of four powerful women Matilda, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, and Margaret of Anjou she examines their experiences and challenges in the context of how feminine authority evolved in England. The She Wolves A Song of Ice and Fire Wiki FANDOM The She Wolves sometimes called The She Wolves of Winterfell is the working title of the fourth Song of Ice and Fire novella It was originally scheduled for publication in as part of the Dangerous Women anthology, edited by George R.R Martin and Gardner Dozois, but later removed in favor of The Princess and the Queen. She Wolves England s Early Queens Jane, Mary May , She Wolves England s Early Queens Isabella Margaret Duration Master Huon Damebrigge , views Monarchy USA Version Episode The Early Kings She Wolves She Wolves are currently tracking the new theme song for our friends at Reality Check TV This tripped out sonic bombardment features special guest Sean Yseult White Zombie, Famous Monsters on bass. She Wolves England s Early Queens TV Mini Series Lucy Worsley gets into bed with our past monarchs to uncover the Tales from the Royal Bedchamber She reveals that our obsession with royal bedrooms, births and succession is She wolf Roman mythology She wolf Roman mythology In the Roman foundation myth, it was a she wolf that nursed and sheltered the twins Romulus and Remus after they were abandoned in the wild by order of King Amulius of Alba Longa She cared for the infants at her den, a cave known as the Lupercal, until they were discovered by a shepherd, Faustulus. She Wolves Folio Society A new fully illustrated Folio Society edition of Helen Castor s She Wolves The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth which depicts the lives of four remarkable medieval women Empress Matilda, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen Isabella, Margaret of Anjou.

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      Posted by:Elizabeth Norton
      Published :2018-09-17T19:59:04+00:00

    About "Elizabeth Norton"

      • Elizabeth Norton

        Elizabeth Norton is a British historian specialising in the queens of England and the Tudor period She obtained an Master of Arts in Archaeology and Anthropology from the University of Cambridge in 2003 and a masters degree in European Archaeology from the University of Oxford in 2004.Elizabeth Norton is the author of five non fiction works She Wolves, The Notorious Queens of England The History Press, 2008 , Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII s Obsession Amberley, 2008 , Jane Seymour, Henry VIII s True Love Amberley, 2009 , Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII s Discarded Bride Amberley, 2009 and Catherine Parr Amberley, 2010 2 She is also the author of two articles Anne of Cleves and Richmond Palace Surrey History, 2009 3 and Scandinavian Influences in the Late Anglo Saxon Sculpture of Sussex Sussex Archaeological Collections, 2009


    259 Comments

    1. Description: This history deals with the bad girls of England's medieval royal dynasties, the queens who earned themselves a notorious reputation. Some of them are well known and have been the subject of biography—Eleanor of Aquitaine, Emma of Normandy, Isabella of France, and Anne Boleyn, for example—while others have not been written about outside academic journals. The appeal of these notorious queens, apart from their shared taste for witchcraft, murder, adultery, and incest, is that bec [...]


    2. This "history" of so-called "notorious" queens of England is nothing more than a gossip column in book form--with all the superficiality and factual errors one would expect from a gossip column. There are several problems with the book. First, each entry manages to be both too general for the knowledgeable reader and too vague for the newcomer. For example, in the introductory chapter leading to the Wars of the Roses queens (Margaret of Anjou and Elizabeth Woodville), the author (Elizabeth Norto [...]


    3. I love Henry VIII books, but have read quite a few now, so wanted to move on to HF of other kings and queens, but did not know which would be most interesting. I thought this book would be helpful in selecting some possibilities. It did, but it also gave me a much better idea of how things changed (and not) for queens with the Norman conquest.To be a good queen you had to:1. Have sons (preferbly the kings)2. Be of noble birth (much safer for the queen to be chosen from Europe than from the Engli [...]



    4. To begin with I was positive about this book until I caught onto one particularly disturbing thing, that completely ruined it all for me, for once I had this in my sight I couldn't focus on anything else; Norton has the most annoying habbit of always using the phrase 'must have'. And I do believe ALWAYS!!!! Let me demonstrate by turning to a random page and count the number of times she uses it:1)Anne must have been exhausted2)Anne must have known3)Anne adopted as her motto, 'the most happy' and [...]


    5. Interesting, especially the earlier parts, which dealt with the queens with whom I was most unfamiliar. Unfortunately, though, while I certainly understand pointing out the biases of the male chroniclers who vilified these women, I felt that Norton took it way too personally and was bending over backwards to justify even the worst behavior as completely understandable in the circumstances. There were also two cases in which Henry V and Henry VI were mixed up (Henry VI lost France - he certainly [...]


    6. I'm putting this on-hold for now (11/09/17). Not a bad read, but not exactly engaging either. I'll come back to it another time.




    7. An accessible and easy read, especially for the subject matter, although the biggest blessing in this was that i was able to breeze through it quickly, otherwise it would have laid abandoned for quite some time. The amount of times I read the phrase “she must have” was infuriating, Norton can’t give us any facts without telling us her personal assumption as to how a particular queen felt at a particular moment, and it begins to feel more like the celeb gossip pages in the paper than a biog [...]


    8. It’s particularly dry reading (as it’s more of a thesis than anything else), but it does give you a lot of useful facts, particularly in infamous queens, or ‘she wolves’ as the title describes. In particular, most infamous queens can be excused by today’s standards, particularly if you realize the queens can fall under at least one of these headings:(view spoiler)[+ Being too ambitious, despite how they were raised or used to (influenced by parents during childhood), having a more equa [...]


    9. A fascinating read, and a faster one than I expected. This is down to a few factors, I felt. Firstly, a lack of sources for the early Anglo-Saxon queens, making Part One brief in writing if not in scope. Secondly, Norton doesn't get bogged down in details; she sticks to the topic, brings in only what is necessary to ensure a complete picture of each queen's life, and keeps things brief. Thirdly, Norton's prose is sparse and simple, making it easily readable; a lot of historical non-fiction I've [...]


    10. ugh. I really, really wanted to like this book. I, like some of the others who have commented, was first turned off by the author repeating unsubstantiated gossip, yet at the same time, summarily dismissing anything written by a male or a Church member. I mean, why is it so hard to believe that some of these women, I don't know, actually had faith? No, she puts everything to cunning and emotion. For example, she notes one contemporary record stating that a former queen repented and then lived ou [...]


    11. I admit it, I have a thing for historical works - fictional or otherwise - about women. This booked popped out at me from a library shelf, so naturally I scooped it up. "She Wolves: The Notorious Queens of Medieval England" is, I imagine, a printing of Norton's Ph. D. thesis. This is not necessarily a bad thing, since the level of analysis is reasonably high (and in this case, the footnotes can be skipped without dire penalty to understanding). Unfortunately, though, Norton makes a few assumptio [...]


    12. The author's thesis is that women in England, preConquest, and under the Normans were not expected to have strength or ambition to rule, and if they tried they were considerd 'unnatural' and 'unwomanly'. The wives or mothers of the saxon kings are not ones that are familiar to modern readers, but if they had power or attempted to have power, their society (and the men who wrote histories) usually classifed them as evil. After the Norman Conquest, it was acceptable to have a wife or mother as reg [...]


    13. This is a comprehensive synopsis of Medieval and Tudor queens who were notorious during their reigns for being accused of crimes ranging from greed to murder. It was well researched, save for a few mis-truths, such as the myth of Lady Jane Grey struggling to find the execution block. I found this book's greatest tragedy was the lack of editing, and Norton's injections of supposed emotion or thought of the said queen consort. "She must have been relieved", or "she must have felt" was included cou [...]


    14. Starting out I'm finding it interesting. I've read a lot of historical fiction, not just from the Tudor era but from the Matilda vs. Stephen era as well. It may help that I'm familiar with the geneologies already, but I like this for how factual it is, but one has to be careful. The author makes some assumptions as to the personalities and feelings of the women, but she does at least provide the background information and rationale.I've read quite a a bit in the form of historical fiction about [...]


    15. While I enjoyed this book I thought author did a lot of speculating on the individual's thoughts and feelings. Of course for many of these queens there is little documented evidence. I also found from reading other books of similar topics that this contradicted what I have read from other authors which leaves me wondering which facts are true. I also understand these women often became know for their aggressive behavior due to circumstances beyond their control or simple because they acted in a [...]


    16. Poor spelling, repetitive, and written in an annoyingly condescending tone of voice. Yes, I understand, accounts of the time were written by men who hated/feared women, but do I really need to be told this seventy times per chapter? Eventually I was on the side of the chroniclers just because I found this writer so irritating. The only redeemable feature are the women chosen for study; several I actually like - based on opinions formed from other sources - and so I give this book two stars.


    17. I can't stand speculative popular biographies, i.e. "She must have felt". Otherwise, things were pretty good. Defo improved when we got to the Tudors, I guess because they left enough of their own primary artefacts to not have to assume the way that they felt about a given situation.


    18. I found this book really interesting, it's a shame that such interesting women aren't known to anyone unless you search them out. I agree it wasn't Tolstoy and it could've been written better, but it gets the information across and that's all I care about.


    19. if you know much history from this time you won't learn a lot. Anyone who knows me knows I like the queens better than the kings, so I was happy to reaxd it.




    20. It lacks the spark that makes historical fiction entertaining. It just didn't hold my interest enough to make it worth finishing right now, so it goes back on the to-read shelf.


    21. Wonderful in parts. Also helps with genealogy. Best account of Mathilda and Stephen, and great background on the importance of Anjou. All in all a good read.




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