The Man with a Shattered World: The History of a Brain Wound

The Man with a Shattered World: The History of a Brain Wound

Alexander R. Luria Lynn Solotaroff Oliver Sacks / Jul 15, 2019

The Man with a Shattered World The History of a Brain Wound Russian psychologist A R Luria presents a compelling portrait of a man s heroic struggle to regain his mental faculties A soldier named Zasetsky wounded in the head at the battle of Smolensk in

  • Title: The Man with a Shattered World: The History of a Brain Wound
  • Author: Alexander R. Luria Lynn Solotaroff Oliver Sacks
  • ISBN: 9780674546257
  • Page: 384
  • Format: Paperback
  • Russian psychologist A R Luria presents a compelling portrait of a man s heroic struggle to regain his mental faculties A soldier named Zasetsky, wounded in the head at the battle of Smolensk in 1943, suddenly found himself in a frightening world he could recall his childhood but not his recent past half his field of vision had been destroyed he had great difficultyRussian psychologist A R Luria presents a compelling portrait of a man s heroic struggle to regain his mental faculties A soldier named Zasetsky, wounded in the head at the battle of Smolensk in 1943, suddenly found himself in a frightening world he could recall his childhood but not his recent past half his field of vision had been destroyed he had great difficulty speaking, reading, and writing Woven throughout his first person account are interpolations by Luria himself, which serve as excellent brief introductions to the topic of brain structure and function.

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    About "Alexander R. Luria Lynn Solotaroff Oliver Sacks"

      • Alexander R. Luria Lynn Solotaroff Oliver Sacks

        Alexander Romanovich Luria Russian was a famous Soviet neuropsychologist and developmental psychologist He was one of the founders of cultural historical psychology and the leaders of the Vygotsky Circle Apart from his work with Vygotsky, he is widely known for his later work with two extraordinary psychological case studies, his study of a man with a highly advanced memory published as The Mind of a Mnemonist, and the study of a man with traumatic brain injury published in The Man with a Shattered World.


    531 Comments

    1. Una lotta che non ha portato alla vittoria e una vittoria che non ha messo fine alla lottaNel 1943 sul Fronte Occidentale russo, Lev A. Zaseckij viene ferito da un proiettile tedesco che gli penetra profondamente nel cervello. Ha 24 anni e da quel momento la sua vita va letteralmente in frantumi. Scrive Oliver Sacks nella nella Prefazione:Soffre di un intollerabile caos visivo che muta continuamente, gli oggetti nel suo campo visivo (in ciò che resta del suo campo visivo) sono instabili (…) G [...]


    2. Zasetsky is a bright young student who goes to war (WWII) and exits with a bullet to his brain, and devastating amnesia. Over the course of the next 25 years, he struggles to come to terms with, to explain, to regain his life, his past, his future, his identity, his purpose. He writes and rewrites over 3000 pages of a journal even though the effort is beyond superhuman: he sometimes takes days to remember a single word or its meaning; a day of writing might yield a single paragraph; he cannot re [...]


    3. I got this book out of a scientific curiosity about brain function. However, I found myself extremely moved by the story told by the unfortunate soldier. He struggled, for the rest of his life, to overcome his considerable disabilities. He showed amazing determination. However, some of his stories - describing his frustration and confusion - tore at my heart.The commentary by his neurologist - Alexander Luria - showed sympathy and admiration as well as the scientific viewpoint I had originally e [...]


    4. Pros : A terrifying surrealistic journey into what it means to suddenly lose what makes you "You" - an interactive human being.When you suddenly wake up and you lost all your knowledge , memories , words or even the ability to communicate.The writing is so vivid that it makes you almost feel what he's living through. I say "almost" because it is impossible to imagine losing what you take for granted " your memories, your senses , the order of the world, left from right, and even your own organs [...]


    5. *Review in Retrospect*Luria makes better, but fewer, readable patient case studies than Oliver Sacks. Luria was the first 'neuropsychologist' and he seems to be figuring out the condition rather than poetically redescribing it as has every other modern clinician-patient story. It's sad really, there is more care and less ego here but it receives less attention. I think this was the most interesting case study I have ever read (even more so than people that believe they are vampires), this man ha [...]


    6. Zazetsky coped with this fragmentation by writing a journal of his thoughts and memories as they occurred, day after day, for 20 years. He then arranged and ordered these entries, in an attempt to reconstruct his lost "self." From over 3000 pages of this journal material, the neurologist A. R. Luria has constructed this extended case history from which emerges a remarkable portrait of Zazetsky as a determined and courageous human being. Zazetsky's first-person account is interspersed with commen [...]


    7. I can see why Sacks was such a fan of Luria, and his case histories. The idea of "romantic science" comes through clearly in this study of a man with a traumatic brain injury. Shot in the head during the battle of Smolensk the subject was never able to regain normal brain function. He spent the rest of his life allowing himself to be used as an experimental subject discovering the functions of the brain, and attempting to relearn basic skills. Fascinating perspective.



    8. Its a light book that can be read for entertainment. Its an eye-opener since you'll enter the world of an injured person (injury in his head) and see what he sees and understand life from his own perspective. There was a lot of repetition, which helped me understand what he is passing through, but still, it was a bit boring. I recommend it for light reading. What's missing in this book is perhaps what can we conclude from his account and how might this story affect neurology and psychology.


    9. Very, very interesting. The workings of the human brain are utterly fascinating, and the working of the patient's spirit is equally awe-inspiring. Unfortunately, my library didn't have the version with Oliver Sack's introduction, as I'm sure that would have been interesting, too.



    10. I must add that JFi WARNED ME THOROUGHLY that this book was hard to get through and repetitious. That said:This book is frustrating the living daylights out of me. The hubris of the therapist, Luria, and his attendant wretched editing make this less of a memoir and more a horrible exercise in the mind-numbing effects of repetition. The book is a selection of Zasetsky's writings over the 25 years of his illness and his struggle for recovery. Unfortunately, the editor was his therapist who seems t [...]


    11. This was the book I was using as the basis for my novel, and lo and behold, I finished reading it on the very last day of NaNoWriMo. :) There were fascinating moments in this book, which is essentially the journal of a man with a traumatic brain injury, with interjections from his doctor throughout. Though interesting, it started to feel repetitive after a while. Perhaps that's the point. But realizing what people with TBI go through is eye-opening, to say the least. It's not just that he forgot [...]


    12. What makes this book slightly tedious is the fact that the brain injury he has doesn't allow him to retain things so he repeats over and over again, forgetting that he has already said it. I kept thinking I was getting stuck on the same sentence on a page only to realize that it was just the same sentence being repeated aka the epitome of redundancy. The actual injury is rather fascinating; how his vision changed, his memory (and lack thereof), how to read and relate, but unfortunately this info [...]


    13. "The Man with a Shattered World describes the heroic struggle of a young soldier trying to recover the memory and other mental capacities lost when a bullet entered his brain."This is a fascinating case study regarding the trauma of brain injury. How Zasetsky was able to come back from such a tragedy in his life is beyond belief. To have your life shattered in such a manner and have to start all over again is quite incredible. Yet he persevered to write his diary even with the severe damage he s [...]


    14. fascinating case study offering a unique insight into the havoc of brain damage, written by the poor soldier himself with commentary by the great luria - a powerful book and good for any psychologists as well as neurologists - and anyone who wants an emotive, inspiring read while learning about language and function in the context of post-WW2 russia


    15. Given the date Professor Luria did his work, this is an outstanding account of neuroscience and how it has developed. One segment of the book I recall is how the still functional parts of Zasetsky's brain continues to retain the building blocks representing the more complex concept of the word bicycle.


    16. Ciekawy temat, fajnie, że ktoś o tym chciał pisać.Pamiętnik bohatera interesujący, choć wiele się powtarza, co jest jednak zrozumiałe w takich warunkach.Styl i sposób komentowania przez Łurię zupełnie mi nie leżyAle w jakimś stopniu od tego wychodził Oliver Sacks, którego książki są świetne - więc - chciałam przeczytać


    17. almost as good as the mind of a mnemonist, only really depressing, because the guy in this one is FUCKED. still though, fucked in a fascinating way.i did used to love reading about the brain problems. wonder why!


    18. A man with a serious brain injury tries to account for his disability. Plus notes from the doctor who treated him for over 25 years. I can't even imagine how horrible it was, even though the descriptions of how he lived and breathed and other science facts were easy to understand. Very sad.





    19. Read this book in college for a linguistics class. Very interesting book - he really gets the frustration of his point across.



    20. Neuroscience was one of the subjects covered in my first degree and I read and enjoyed this book when I was an undergraduate in Trinity College Dublin.


    21. A necessary read for anyone interested in neuropsychology. This book is an amazing memoir to read. It puts into perspective how much people suffer from disease.


    22. I read this a few years back and I must say it is really a great book. (Along with the other book, Mind of a Mnemonist)


    23. Zasetsky's descriptions of his vision and memory loss coupled with Luria's explanations of normal brain function give an incredible description of a head trauma.


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