Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories

Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories

Richard White William Cronon / Jul 20, 2019

Remembering Ahanagran A History of Stories Sara Walsh was born in in the west of Ireland in a land of storytellers In prose that is neither history nor memoir but something larger and brighter than both Remembering Ahanagran captures he

  • Title: Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories
  • Author: Richard White William Cronon
  • ISBN: 9780295983554
  • Page: 359
  • Format: Paperback
  • Sara Walsh was born in 1919 in the west of Ireland, in a land of storytellers In prose that is neither history nor memoir but something larger and brighter than both, Remembering Ahanagran captures her memories of her early years in Ireland, her migration to the United States, and her marriage to Harry White, the Harvard educated son of Russian Jewish emigrants Her son,Sara Walsh was born in 1919 in the west of Ireland, in a land of storytellers In prose that is neither history nor memoir but something larger and brighter than both, Remembering Ahanagran captures her memories of her early years in Ireland, her migration to the United States, and her marriage to Harry White, the Harvard educated son of Russian Jewish emigrants Her son, eminent historian Richard White, in collaboration with Sara, forces history as it is traditionally written into conversation with personal recollections.

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    277 Comments

    1. The book Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories, by Richard White was published in Seattle at the University of Washington Press copywrited in 1998. The author is a much respected historian who’s book stirred up much controversy. He has published many respected books, however this particular book isn't quite as popular as is others. Richard White being top notch American historian graduated with a Ph.D. from Washing University, his colleagues there helped him in the writing of this book. [...]


    2. I really enjoyed this book. Richard White writes a book about his mother, but he calls into question how we remember our own histories. This book is about his mother, but it is also about what history itself remembers and how our perspectives are forced into the narrative. It was a fascinating and quick read!



    3. Richard White’s Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories is about the intersection of memory and history and how each has an important part to play in studying the past. History is the stuff of facts and figures, documents and archives. Memory is the stuff of stories, experience, and emotion. Both have a contribution to make in discovering the “truth” about the past. Richard White is telling his mother Sara Walsh’s stories of the past, and using those stories to illustrate what he see [...]


    4. Richard White explores the difference between history and memory while telling the story of his mother's journey from Ireland to America. He's a historian and more caught up with the dialectic regarding historical veracity than a casual reader might be, or than I was. But I enjoyed his musings, in particular his observation of immigrants', specifically the Irish, long view of history, spanning generations and centuries, as opposed to the much shorter view I, as a third or fourth generation Irish [...]


    5. In an example of cross-referencing memory versus history, Richard White’s Remembering Ahanagran offers an anti-memoir of his mother’s experience in immigrating to the United States. The book is broken down into a foreword, introduction, four parts with thirty-six chapters, and an epilogue. Published by University of Washington Press from Seattle and London in 1998, the book has been peer-reviewed intensively. Richard White is a well-known historian at the University of Washington who had th [...]


    6. In the Book Remembering Ahanagran written by Richard White, he shows the experiences of his mother when she immigrated to the United States. This book was published by the University of Washington Press in Seattle in 1998. Richard White is widely known and very well respected historian. Richard White is a well-known author and historian about The American West and Native Americans. Rich White has previously taught University of Washington, University of Utah, Michigan State University and is cur [...]


    7. Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories was written by Richard White and published by the University of Washington Press in 2004. Richard White is a historian at Stanford. He studies many areas but in this book he focuses on memory and history as he uses them to write this captivating and complex narrative of his mother’s travels to America. Through documents and memories of his mother and other family members he completes this narrative constantly pointing out the conversation between mem [...]


    8. In the book Remembering Ahanagran historian Richard White provides readers with an insight to his family life. This book was published with the University of Washington Press in 2004. White is an established historian specializing in the history of the American West, he works for Stanford University. During the duration of writing this he acquired help from fellow historians: Robin Stacey, George Behlmer, Hillel Kieval, and Thomas Pressly in order to provide needed details on Irish history. Rich [...]


    9. Published in 1998 by the University of Washington Press was Richard White’s book Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories. This was White's way of documenting his mothers memories of her and her family as they gradually left Ireland for America, yet he does so through the lens of analyzing both memory and texts as historical sources. At times the book reads a bit dry, and some of his wording in his analysis of the memories/texts paints a murky picture of what he's trying to convey to reader [...]


    10. History is the interpretation of past events and although never completely objective, it is the mission of every historian to use primary source evidence to create the most comprehensive and valid story possible. Memory on the other hand is completely objective and is based on an individual's personal feelings and experiences. In his 1998 book Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories, historian Richard White combines history and memory into a narrative about his mother and her immigration to [...]


    11. An excellent exploration by the author into the role that memories and oral history serve and compare to academic history. White used his own family and their stories as the basis for his material. The surface story White tells is his mother's origins in Ireland - the politics, the poverty, and the cleaving to the land. Sara becomes one of millions to leave her homeland and arrive in America to make a new life. Although she arrived with no money and no idea what it meant to be 'American', she wa [...]


    12. Richard White, a historian and a Margaret Bryne Professor and Stanford University, published Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories, one of his lesser-known books, in 1998. This book, is based upon his family history and essentially his mother’s memories, however, it is not considered to be a memoir, because White injects the narrative with hard facts, questioning the stories he has been told. This book, while controversial in the academic community, has many strengths throughout it, but [...]


    13. Remembering Ahanagran was written by Richard White, an acclaimed historian and author of almost ten books. He is currently a professor of history at Stanford University, although he previously taught at Universities in Utah, Washington, and Michigan. One of these schools, the University of Washington, published Remembering Ahanagran in 1998. The book does an incredible job of recreating a narrative by combining history and memory with theoretical analysis, while it falls short by being unspecifi [...]


    14. In 1998 the University of Washington Press published Richard White’s book Remembering Ahanagran: A History of Stories. It was written by White as a way of honoring his mother and telling her story. However, White explains in his introduction that as a historian he will write her story but analyze the memory and documents of the book. After digging up his mothers memories, White then pieced together the blanks to create his families story. White does a great job connecting history and memory ho [...]


    15. I appreciated what White was trying to do here, but I felt like too often this book ended up as simply a biography of his mother. And his mother was clearly interesting and deserving of having her story told, but what makes this book special are the parts where White examines places where her stories and the stories of his family differ from the actual history that he can dig up as a historian. That's where this book comes alive, and after I while I started to feel like those parts were sort of [...]


    16. I liked the story part of this book--when he actually talked about his family. He spent far too much time telling us how his mother confused memories with fact. Okay, okay. He made his point but didn't need to harp on it. I wish he would have had footnotes or endnotes. I wanted to see where he was getting his information. At the end of the book he talked some of the sources.He did a good job trying to figure out why his grandfather's information on his naturalization papers was different than kn [...]


    17. An interesting examination of the relationship between history and memory. This was Richard White's attempt to reach out to a broader audience, so the lack of any sort of notes is annoying at times, since a large part of his analysis is based on where information comes from. Overall, an entertaining look into both the worlds of historical research and also the role of the past in our everyday lives, and how those sometimes get blended. Overall, this is an examination of how historians (and every [...]


    18. Professionally and personally, I have explored my family and its past, and this book speaks to me with a depth and an excitement hard to match. White ties his mother's stories with the history of those times past. The history and the memory do not always agreed, but neither is complete without the other. I've known this throughout my career as history writer, researcher, and editor; reading White is like hearing a familiar tale told in a new, deeper, more insightful way.


    19. White is a historian - he tries to understand the 'truth' in his mother's stories of this tiny town in Ireland as compared to the 'truth' he learns through professional research: oral history vs. traditional source research on a very personal level


    20. A remarkable book in which the author established a "conversation" between his mother's stories about her past--her memories--and his reconstruction of her past based on historical evidence.





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