Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge

Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge

Erica Armstrong Dunbar / Jun 25, 2019

Never Caught The Washingtons Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave Ona Judge A startling and eye opening look into America s First Family Never Caught is the powerful narrative of Ona Judge George and Martha Washington s runaway slave who risked it all to escape the nation s

  • Title: Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge
  • Author: Erica Armstrong Dunbar
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 219
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • A startling and eye opening look into America s First Family, Never Caught is the powerful narrative of Ona Judge, George and Martha Washington s runaway slave who risked it all to escape the nation s capital and reach freedom.When George Washington was elected president, he reluctantly left behind his beloved Mount Vernon to serve in Philadelphia, the temporary seat of thA startling and eye opening look into America s First Family, Never Caught is the powerful narrative of Ona Judge, George and Martha Washington s runaway slave who risked it all to escape the nation s capital and reach freedom.When George Washington was elected president, he reluctantly left behind his beloved Mount Vernon to serve in Philadelphia, the temporary seat of the nation s capital, after a brief stay in New York In setting up his household he took Tobias Lear, his celebrated secretary, and nine slaves, including Ona Judge, about which little has been written As he grew accustomed to Northern ways, there was one change he couldn t get his arms around Pennsylvania law required enslaved people be set free after six months of residency in the state Rather than comply, Washington decided to circumvent the law Every six months he sent the slaves back down south just as the clock was about to expire.Though Ona Judge lived a life of relative comfort, the few pleasantries she was afforded were nothing compared to freedom, a glimpse of which she encountered first hand in Philadelphia So, when the opportunity presented itself one clear and pleasant spring day in Philadelphia, Judge left everything she knew to escape to New England Yet freedom would not come without its costs.At just twenty two years old, Ona became the subject of an intense manhunt led by George Washington, who used his political and personal contacts to recapture his property.Impeccably researched, historian Erica Armstrong Dunbar weaves a powerful tale and offers fascinating new scholarship on how one young woman risked it all to gain freedom from the famous founding father.

    Never Caught The Washingtons Relentless Pursuit of Their Never Caught is the compelling story of Ona Judge Staines, the woman who successfully defied George and Martha Washington in order to live as free woman With vivid prose and deep sympathy, Dunbar paints a portrait of woman whose life reveals the contradictions at the heart of the American founding men like Washington fought for liberty for themselves even as they kept people like Ona Staines in Never Caught The Washingtons Relentless Pursuit of Their Never Caught The Washingtons Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge Erica Armstrong Dunbar on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Finalist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction A fascinating and moving account of a courageous and resourceful woman. Never Caught The Washingtons Relentless Pursuit of Their Quotes from Never Caught The Decades later, Southerners would justify the institution of slavery with descriptions of the supposed benefits that came with enslavement According to many Southerners, slaves were better cared for, better fed, sheltered, and treated almost as though they were members of Never Caught Erica Armstrong Dunbar February A startling and eye opening look into America s First Family, Never Caught is the powerful narrative of Ona Judge, George and Martha Washington s runaway slave who risked it all to escape the nation s capital and reach freedom. Never Caught Book by Erica Armstrong Dunbar Official Never Caught is a gripping story of courage of a black slave woman who sacrificed many things including her family to gain freedom Never Caught shows freedom is important than anything else What makes Never Caught uniquely interesting and important is that this is one of the rare narratives from a black woman slave. Never Caught The Washingtons Relentless Pursuit of Their Never Caught shows freedom is important than anything else What makes Never Caught uniquely interesting and important is that this is one of the rare narratives from a black woman slave It also shines light on the dark corners of American history and the first Family, the Washingtons. Never Caught Summary SuperSummary Never Caught is the true story of Oney Ona Judge, a mixed race slave born in She begins life as the daughter of an enslaved seamstress mother and an indentured servant father She begins life as the daughter of an enslaved seamstress mother and an indentured servant father. Never Caught The Story of Ona Judge by Erica Armstrong Feb , Overall, Never Caught The Story of Ona Judge is an important part of American history and is an enjoyable, informative audiobook. Summary and reviews of Never Caught by Erica Armstrong Dunbar Book Summary A startling and eye opening look into America s First Family, Never Caught is the powerful narrative of Ona Judge, George and Martha Washington s runaway slave who risked it all to escape the nation s capital and reach freedom. Never Been Caught Release and reception After recording Never Been Caught, the Mummies played many shows on the West Coast of the United States and toured Washington and Canada with Thee Headcoats After a brief tour of the East Coast with performances in New York, Washington, D.C and New Jersey, they returned to San Francisco in early January

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        Erica Armstrong Dunbar Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge book, this is one of the most wanted Erica Armstrong Dunbar author readers around the world.


    600 Comments

    1. Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Never Caught is an informative, well-researched, swift read about Ona Judge George and Martha Washington.


    2. The story of Ona Maria Judge, slave to President George Washington who escaped his presidential residence in Philadelphia and fled by sea to Portsmouth, New Hampshire in May 1796, may be one of the most intriguing escape narratives ever told. I’d first heard of Oney Judge and Washington’s pursuit of her from a mind-expanding history of black freed men and slaves in New Hampshire called Black Portsmouth, written by Valerie Cunningham and Mark J. Sammons. In this work, historian E.A. Dunbar ex [...]


    3. I'm so glad Ona Judge's story is abroad in the world. She's clearly a woman of grit, determination, resourcefulness, and strength of belief, and there are far too few women from her time period and experiences known to history. But I did not really enjoy this portrayal of her story.Part of the reason for that is that, while the title, subtitle, and summary promise an exciting pursuit of a daring runaway slave, half the book is actually just historical description of the Washingtons' movements ar [...]


    4. Never Caught is a thoroughly researched and moving account of a woman who refused to be property. I wouldn't recommend this book to the casual reader because it can be very dry at times, so I only recommend it to those who are very interested in history. I learned a lot about George and Martha Washington as well as what life was like at the beginning of this country.Popsugar 2017 Reading Challenge: Book Involving Travel


    5. This book is a pop history in the vein of Erik Larson. Not a compliment. Oh how I wanted to love this book—what a subject! What a courageous person. Pros: Ona Judge was a complete badass. This book is a quick, easy read and accessible to teenagers. That's important. And it really does seem to be well-researched, with extensive endnotes. Cons: This book reads like a really strong first draft of a much better book. The paragraphs and pages seem cobbled together, with a lot of repetitive phrasing [...]


    6. 2.5 stars I thinkor maybe I should say "Emily would have been inclined to give the book 2.5 stars if there would have been such an option available to her in the rating system of her day"ugh. First, the positive. Without such a book, I would not have known anything at all of Ona Judge. I do know some history, took some visits to Mount Vernon, but the history of the moves of the president and therefore his slaves from Mount Vernon to NY, then Philadelphia was interesting.But, since there seems to [...]


    7. 3.5 starsGrievances first: 1) the repetition. There were far too many occasions when the exact same thing was said in several sentences of a paragraph, and then also later repeated in subsequent chapters. 2) The word "breach" (as in "of security" or "of trust") was misspelled/misused as "breech" (as in birth, or pantaloon) in at least three places in the book. 3) the term "nuclear family" was used twice to describe a family in the late 18th century, although the term wasn't coined/used until the [...]


    8. I receivedNever Caught in return for an unbiased review.Who was Ona Judge? I don't know and apparently neither does anyone else. This story, while apparently heavily annotated, seems heavily opinionated and filled with trivial facts. In truth, I imagine it was probably quite difficult to dig up very much information on a slave that couldn't read or write until late in life and didn't leave hardly any opinions of her own.I think the story is amazing and I would have loved to have learned more abo [...]


    9. If you're listening to this book, you should probably listen to a neutral palate cleanser before listening to Hamilton. Going from actual Washington to Chris Jackson is jarring. Anyway, it's a wonderful short-but-not-little work of history that uses the Washingtons and Judge to reconstruct the complexity (and hypocrisy) of slavery in the 18th century. The book itself is cautious, indicating clearly the difference between what we can know and what we can only speculate. It's a stark reminder how [...]


    10. Not a very in-depth view of slavery at the dawn of the American nation. Some good reference points regarding the first president and his ties with the slavery industry ( doesn’t make him look good), but the slave itself doesn’t get much attention , basically she escaped and was never caught (as the title of the book let’s you knowspoilersI know) . It’s mostly about the different meetings the first president had and so all the places the slave (onea Judge) visited , the book is mostly a l [...]


    11. Despite the limitations of historical record that Dunbar was working with, this book is very easy to recommend, especially for readers who are interested in this period or aspect of history but don't necessarily have extensive background knowledge. The writing itself is very accessible. Particularly, I was impressed by how Dunbar highlighted the inescapable emotional labor that's part of an enslaved person's work, and the way she clearly explained (without excusing) the mindsets of slaveowners. [...]



    12. It seems that there really isn’t that much known about Ona Judge, which leads to a lot of “she would have” done or felt a certain way. Also, the few letters written over a few years and a couple of visits to negotiate with her to return hardly seemed like a “relentless pursuit”. On the up side, this book gives a lot of great historical information on how enslaved people navigated the laws and their lives in the early days of the country.


    13. My third Tackling the TBR! I truly didn’t want this one to end and tried my best to savor each page, a hard task with such a short book. Still, I’m immensely happy I finally set aside the time to dive into this one! Never Caught is a highly readable, engaging read perfect for fans of historical fiction (the narrative flows just like a fiction novel, making it a great book for those put off by dry, academic works) and nonfiction alike.For the full review and more, head over to The Pretty Good [...]


    14. This was so disappointing. I was looking forward to hearing about Ona Judge, sadly 90-95% of this book is dedicated to the Washingtons. Much of the information shared was supposition about Ona's life. Phrases like Ona might have, could have, would have, were frequent. Sentences that began with, Ona did, were very few. The title for the book is very misleading. There is very little about Ona Judge included. I think a more accurate title would have been 'The Washington's Slaves'. I wish the interv [...]



    15. Full review at Smart Bitches, Trashy BooksNever Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge is a nonfiction book about the efforts of one of George and Martha Washington’s slaves, Ona Judge, to secure her freedom. In the process, the book describes the struggle the new nation had with slavery and how different states and different individuals dealt with the matter.This book shines in revealing Martha, George, and Ona as people, with flaws and moods and famil [...]


    16. The subject of this book is fascinating, and reminds us that the Founding Fathers were human and far less than perfect. Ona Judge was a house slave for the Washingtons during his Presidency (technically, she belonged to Martha Washington) who escaped while the "White House" was in Philadelphia. She relocated to New Hampshire, but had to endure a rigorous pursuit by George Washington and his allies. She managed to remain free, and lived to tell her story many years later. The book points out how [...]


    17. As someone who has visited Mount Vernon dozens of times, I found this book to be very eye-opening and a reminder of the full picture of who George Washington and his wife were in real life. They upheld and benefited from the institution of slavery, and I feel this is a fact we need to confront and consider.



    18. 3.5 stars rounded up.I really enjoyed this book but it was not exactly what I had expected. I would have liked the book to focus more on Ona Judge and her life but it was more about the Washington’s. That may be because there is scant evidence about Ona and her life after “freedom”. She wasn’t exactly out there telling the world she was a fugitive. Even though I think the book was well researched, it seemed at times as if the author was assuming or imposing certain thoughts/actions on On [...]


    19. The life of Ona Judge is undoubtedly a compelling and fascinating one.Her father was a white Englishman and her mother a slave, Judge grew up at Mount Vernon, the home of George and Martha Washington. One of over 200 slaves in bondage there, life was difficult and ever subject to sudden and dramatic change. Such a change occurred at roughly age 16 when being elected to the Presidency, Washington took Judge and other select slaves to the nation’s capital in Philadelphia. We don’t know how she [...]


    20. Nice bit of history here uncovered. The book has a YA feel, which makes for fast reading but detracts from the scholarliness. Clearly the author has gone to great lengths to bring us this story of Ona Judge, and what I find most interesting is the President of the US, George Washington remained extremely interested in perusing his "property" while serving as the leader of the new nation and beyond, right up to his death. Apparently, Ona Judge gave two interviews later on in her life, and much to [...]


    21. This book should probably a supposition-ography instead of a biography. It appears there is not enough documentation to know what Ona Judge (slave of George and Martha Washington) thought or the actions she took while a slave or later when she was a fugitive. Although, the authors presumptions are in line with what we know and think today, there is no way to know if Ona Judge talked with others about escape, planned it extensively or if it was more spur of the moment. It is likely she had some h [...]


    22. We have very few written records of 18th-Century slaves who shared their stories about the institution and experience of slavery. Almost forty-seven years after Ona Judge escaped from her owners, the first president of the United States and his wife, she told her story in the Granite Freeman. Two more years later, interviewed for the Liberator, the nation's most powerful abolitionist newspaper, she told it again. Those interviews are possibly the only existing recorded narratives of her story of [...]


    23. After reading a story about the author in my local newspaper, I was excited to learn more about this interesting unknown character in history. Unfortunately, I was disappointed.Much of the book seemed to be nothing more than the author's opinions with no basis that is repeated over and over. The book will give details on the number of staff, who slept on which floor, but no description of daily life. I never got a chance to get to know Ona, I suspect it is because the author doesn't know her eit [...]


    24. I would give this 3-1/2 stars if had half stars. I thought it would contain more of Ona Judge's actual words. There was more speculation than I was expecting. I'd still recommend it to anyone interested in early American history and/or the founding fathers as flawed humans.


    25. This is the true story of Ona Judge, born into slaveryd her flight to freedom. I found it a poignant story and the author did a great deal of research as is evidenced in the extensive sections at the end of the book for references Notes and Bibliography and illustrations (appearing in the book). I think what makes the story of special interest was the fact that Ona was a dower slave owned by Mrs. Washington and the great lengths the President went to capture and return her to bondage, unsuccessf [...]


    26. I thoroughly enjoyed this book but the title is a bit deceiving. It’s not really about the evil slave owning Washington’s relentless pursuit of Ona. It focuses a lot on her life as a slave before the escape as well as the Washington’s life as evil slave owners. I will say there was too much about the evil slave owning Washington’s but it provided context. There isn’t all that much about the pursuit until the very end and I’m not sure I would call it relentless. Having said that it wa [...]


    27. This is the history no one ever teaches our children which SHOULD be taught, and not excused. The POTUS Washington played games to continue keeping his slaves despite the mindset of the northern states in which he resided, and the rules of law of the day. Moving slaves around to avoid giving them freedom, and doing things "their way" because of the position they held in government. Sickening. Well researched fast paced book that was a page turner.


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