A Burglar's Guide to the City

A Burglar's Guide to the City

Geoff Manaugh / Oct 16, 2019

A Burglar s Guide to the City Encompassing nearly years of heists and tunnel jobs break ins and escapes A Burglar s Guide to the City offers an unexpected blueprint to the criminal possibilities in the world all around us

  • Title: A Burglar's Guide to the City
  • Author: Geoff Manaugh
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 346
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Encompassing nearly 2,000 years of heists and tunnel jobs, break ins and escapes, A Burglar s Guide to the City offers an unexpected blueprint to the criminal possibilities in the world all around us You ll never see the city the same way again At the core of A Burglar s Guide to the City is an unexpected and thrilling insight how any building transforms when seen throEncompassing nearly 2,000 years of heists and tunnel jobs, break ins and escapes, A Burglar s Guide to the City offers an unexpected blueprint to the criminal possibilities in the world all around us You ll never see the city the same way again.At the core of A Burglar s Guide to the City is an unexpected and thrilling insight how any building transforms when seen through the eyes of someone hoping to break into it Studying architecture the way a burglar would, Geoff Manaugh takes readers through walls, down elevator shafts, into panic rooms, up to the buried vaults of banks, and out across the rooftops of an unsuspecting city.With the help of FBI Special Agents, reformed bank robbers, private security consultants, the L.A.P.D Air Support Division, and architects past and present, the book dissects the built environment from both sides of the law Whether picking padlocks or climbing the walls of high rise apartments, finding gaps in a museum s surveillance routine or discussing home invasions in ancient Rome, A Burglar s Guide to the City has the tools, the tales, and the x ray vision you need to see architecture as nothing than an obstacle that can be outwitted and undercut.Full of real life heists both spectacular and absurd A Burglar s Guide to the City ensures readers will never enter a bank again without imagining how to loot the vault or walk down the street without planning the perfect getaway.

    A Burglar s Guide to the City A Burglar s Guide to the City was one of s Best Books of , as well as a summer reading pick for the Financial Times It spent two consecutive months on the New York Times Monthly Bestseller list for crime A Burglar s Guide to the City is currently being A Burglar s Guide to the City by Geoff Manaugh Mar , Partly an ethnography of burglary practices and overlooked vulnerabilities, partly a thoughtful exploration of how burglars interact with architecture in ways counter to expectation or design intent, A Burglar s Guide to the City is a deeply engrossing and thought provoking work. The Burglar s Guide to Your Home metropolismag This article was adapted from A Burglar s Guide to the City Farrar, Straus and Giroux, by Geoff Manaugh Burglars have been known to walk through a house and, before stealing anything at all, unlock another door from within or pop open a window, thus ensuring a quick escape. FSG Originals A Burglar s Guide to the City A Burglar s Guide to the City makes disparate connections seem obvious in hindsight, and my worldview is altered a little bit , and far for the better, as a result Sarah Weinman, Barnes Noble Review Geoff Manaugh s A Burglar s Guide to the City gives the realm of architecture the kinetic thrills of a A Burglar s Guide to the City Kindle edition by Geoff A Burglar s Guide to the City shows that architecture is too important to leave to just the architects Bjarke Ingels, architect, BIG Manaugh turns the building world inside out in this fascinating view of the modern city as seen through the eyes of a potential burglar . A Burglars Guide To The City akokomusic A Burglar s Guide to the City Geoff Manaugh Encompassing nearly , years of heists and tunnel jobs, break ins and escapes, A Burglar s Guide to the City offers an unexpected blueprint to the criminal possibilities in the world all around us You ll never see the city the same way again At the core of A Burglar s Guide to the City is an A Burglar s Guide to the City Free Radical Radio A Burglar s Guide to the City December , If we ve managed to move beyond the social and moral boundaries of this world, burglars have defied the literal functions of inside, outside, floor, ceiling, or path, hall, doorway and maybe human.

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        Geoff Manaugh Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Burglar's Guide to the City book, this is one of the most wanted Geoff Manaugh author readers around the world.


    137 Comments

    1. I'm going to save you some time and give you the entire takeaway from this book here: Burglars do not use the architectural features of buildings as they were intended, often going through walls, ceilings or floors to gain entry.Instead of creative capers, the of author A Burglar's Guide to the City gives us mundane stories about police ride alongs and interviews he conducted. This book would better be titled, "My experiences researching a book about burglary."A great deal of space, for instance [...]


    2. I've been putting this off because there are two types of reviews that I like to write: those where I loved the book and want to sing its praises, and those where I really despised it and can't wait to tear it to pieces. When a book is just mediocre I can't get up the energy to bother to say anything.I mean, I pre-ordered this book. Don't even remember how I came across it, but I read the blurb on - "At the core of A Burglar's Guide to the City is an unexpected and thrilling insight: how any [...]


    3. I really wanted to give this book a higher rating. I heard Manaugh interviewed on NPR and was looking forward to the book. It needed to be shorter, by at least a 25%. If it had been, I would have given it 5 stars. The information was delivered well, it just needed to be tighter. He should shop for a better editor.


    4. 3.5 stars rounded down.I quite enjoyed A Burglar's Guide to the City. It was packed full of interesting information, albeit in a very disorganized manner, and various explorations into the means, tools, and minds of burglars. Manaugh not only explores the art of burglary but the architectural structures with all of their vulnerabilities that they burglarize. We learn early on that burglary is not theft, but the entering of a walled structure to commit a felony:"[T]o commit burglary you must cros [...]


    5. Well-researched, full of great anecdotes and interesting architectural information. As a card-carrying nerd, I would have appreciated a bit more information on the background and origins of the weird spaces and architectural loopholes burglars exploit: the history of drywall construction, for example, or how and why tunnel systems are created and how and why they can be forgotten. I wanted this to be a monumental volume, a kind of anti-Seeing Like a State—Seeing like a Radical, Seeing like a C [...]


    6. Um livro curioso em cima de uma boa premissa: como um ladrão vê uma cidade. E entrega exatamente isso, como bandidos usam diferentes partes de construções para fazer um assalto. De fechaduras a cofres, de túneis a saídas de emergência, achei um livro bem legal e inesperado. Ele não romantiza assaltantes, mas explica como precisam pensar de forma diferente para explorar vulnerabilidades e ver a arquitetura de outra forma. Em especial, curti a forma como analisou o Die Hard como um dos fil [...]


    7. I wanted to love this book and thought I was going to from the opening chapter but it meanders. The author is weirdly repetitive at times (e.g the author is weirdly repetitive at times) and the book can't seem to figure out if it wants to be pop science or more philosophical architecture discussion. Regularly swapping between the two means neither ever quite gets fleshed out.That said, I liked a lot of it and it gave me a couple of ideas about how to improve our house's security, so I can't comp [...]


    8. I loved this book. It's a combination between psychological/criminological information on burglars and architectural theories/elements that allow them to move around the environment. It's an awesome combination of theory and practice and covers a lot of things I am directly interested in, as a criminology student. I would recomend it to everyone, but especially those with a keen interest in criminology or architecture, becausr it really is a joy to read.Yes it has shortcomings, most notably the [...]


    9. Long essays are probably best suited to magazines, except for the fact that there really aren't magazines anymore; longform articles aren't great for the short attention-span of the net, and they certainly aren't very good when stretched out to book length. Here we have a case of the latter.An intriguing premise-- that there is an alternate way to contextualize our habitat, through the eyes of the burglar, the intruder, the outsider-- gets any reader right into the thick of the discussion. 'Arch [...]


    10. Manaugh looks at architecture and the central role it plays in the crime of burglary. The book begins and ends with the 19th-century New York superburglar George Leonidas Leslie, who used his training as an architect to figure out new and unexpected ways to gain entry to building. There were parts of this book that I found completely fascinating, and it made me look at our own efforts at home security differently. However, Manaugh has a tendency towards repetition. He’s very fond of lists: for [...]


    11. the burglar is a three-dimensional actor amid the two-dimensional surfaces and objects of the city. this means operating with a fundamentally different spatial sense of how architecture should work, and how one room could be connected to another. it means seeing how a building can be stented: engineering short-circuits where mere civilians, altogether less aggressive users of the city, would never expect to find them. burglary is topology pursued by other means: a new science of the city, procee [...]


    12. This is a stunningly dull and repetitive book. It has about one chapter's worth of information, stretched and padded to over 200 pages. The author will write a perfectly pleasant, informative paragraph, nicely summing up a topic. Then, he will follow up with three or four more paragraphs, restating the same ideas and sentiments. At several points, I laughed out loud at his literary acrobatics, desperately re-wrapping the same packages. I finally gave up, skimmed the rest, and found more of the s [...]



    13. The point repeated often through this book is that burglars do not use the architectural features of most buildings at they were intended. Additional locks on the door are not much use if they can go through the wall, the ceiling or the floor. Chapters are spent discussing tunnels, roof jobs, and holing up within a Toys R Us. The book begins and ends with George Leonidas Leslie, an architect turned burglar.Extraneously, the author rode along in LAPD helicopters, looking at street layouts but mos [...]


    14. It appears that as well as there being a lock-picking group in Calista's neighborhood, there's one in Brooklyn, too! More exploration is needed here.This was a fascinating book about architecture and how people think about space and buildings and construction and burglary! Highly recommended.


    15. This was a big departure from what I usually read, but taking a chance on something different paid off. It was fascinating to go along with the author as he worked his way through research of all kinds, exploring many different facets of burglary, or anything remotely related to burglary. That was perhaps the most interesting part--the author's tendency to twist and turn through subtopics, going off on what seemed to be tangents, only to have them tie back in to the main themes, or be explored a [...]


    16. The idea behind this was interesting but it read a bit dryly for me. The short of it is that Burglars use architecture opposite the way it is intended, and challenge the way people live. Overall it had a few moments of 'that's neat' but otherwise I had trouble staying focused on it (I listened to the audio book).


    17. I cross the street at the crosswalk. I use the entrance and exit doors as marked, even when they take me a long way around. Sometimes, I wait forlornly on deserted street corners for the sign to indicate that it is finally all right to “WALK”. So, like Geoff Manaugh, author of A burglar's guide to the city, I was thrilled to learn that there were other ways to understand and move through urban spaces. This is not an instruction manual or safety guide. It doesn’t teach you to be a burglar. [...]


    18. Overall, I found it to be entertaining and informative, although I was left wanting to know more about the architecture of buildings and how they are utilized by burglars, as well as the thought processes of burglars and how they differ from those of people that do not generally think about burgling in their day-to-day lives.The information about using a building's fire codes to identify the layout of a floor down to what doors are alarmed, the distance from a unit to the exit, and the layout of [...]


    19. Endlessly fascinating and full of information that will make you alternately disgusted, paranoid, and gleefully absorbed, Manaugh has researched this thing to death and done all of the right interviews with all of the right people. It's a great, gripping read filled with not only stories about real thieves and heists, but also comparisons to the literature and movies about them. Even more fun than I thought it was going to be.


    20. Occasionally a little repetitive, and at times too in love with its own digressions into pretty prose, but overall a really interesting and thought-provoking read. I don't know if I'd recommend this to everyone, but writers should definitely give it a try.


    21. Interesting content but Manaugh Circumlocutiously repeats everything he says. This leads to some great turns of phrase in all the variations on the theme of not using architecture as intended but by the end of the book it's mostly just tedious.


    22. Another book I should not have persevered with. Repetitive, forced and with little content. It finishes where it started. It's enough to just read the blurb. A massive disappointment despite the promising topic.


    23. Partly an ethnography of burglary practices and overlooked vulnerabilities, partly a thoughtful exploration of how burglars interact with architecture in ways counter to expectation or design intent, A Burglar's Guide to the City is a deeply engrossing and thought-provoking work. I loved author Geoff Manaugh's analysis and real-world examples, particularly in terms of the escalating contest between criminals and police / security forces to work around one another's latest advances and the ways b [...]


    24. I listened to about 2 hours of this book on audio and, let me tell you, I am so glad I got it from the library and didn't use one of my credits on Audible. This had SUCH a great premise and I was so excited for it, but the author's acrobatics in language style was so irritating that I couldn't bring myself to finish it. Essentially, what the author does is that practically every single statement is followed by some sort of stupid simile or metaphor. I couldn't take it anymore after the author co [...]


    25. I'm in a phase of my life where I'm discovering my love for architecture and the built environment. When I bought this book I was expecting it to explore the urban environment and architecture through the lens of crime. Even though it does do that, I felt like some of the ideas covered weren't exactly fully developed. It somehow left me feeling like it had a lot more potential and somehow it didn't meet it. It was an interesting read overall and would recommend it as a casual book.


    26. What fun. As a fan of heist films (planning and getaways) this book looked good. But the biggest effect wasn't entertainment - though there was plenty of that - but of reframing. A lot of people view the world the same way. Burglars don't. This book led to questioning how I see the world.


    27. While there were bursts of entertaining facts about blueprints and break ins, the overall impression this book left me with was mediocre. This is said despite the fact that bank heists are one of my favorite stories when the plots are timed and intricate and no innocents are gunned down.


    28. This was a fun read. The ways burglars use the patterns they've observed to break into placing was interesting. This book covers more the exceptional burglar, than the common place one.


    29. Scary book. Really opened my eyes to burglary. Will never feel the same about leaving my home or coming back to it after being gone for awhile. Always worried about someone with a key breaking in. That is the least of my worries. If you want to know about burglary, this is the book for you.


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