Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia

Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia

Erik Reece John J. Cox Wendell Berry / Apr 18, 2019

Lost Mountain A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia A new form of strip mining has caused a state of emergency for the Appalachian wilderness and the communities that depend on it a crisis compounded by issues of government neglect corporate hubris a

  • Title: Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia
  • Author: Erik Reece John J. Cox Wendell Berry
  • ISBN: 9781594482366
  • Page: 121
  • Format: Paperback
  • A new form of strip mining has caused a state of emergency for the Appalachian wilderness and the communities that depend on it a crisis compounded by issues of government neglect, corporate hubris, and class conflict In this powerful call to arms, Erik Reece chronicles the year he spent witnessing the systematic decimation of a single mountain and offers a landmark defenA new form of strip mining has caused a state of emergency for the Appalachian wilderness and the communities that depend on it a crisis compounded by issues of government neglect, corporate hubris, and class conflict In this powerful call to arms, Erik Reece chronicles the year he spent witnessing the systematic decimation of a single mountain and offers a landmark defense of a national treasure threatened with extinction.

    Lost Mountain Middle School Electronic Devices All personal electronic devices cell phones, tablets, iPod s, PSP s, etc must be turned off upon arrival at school and remain off until the school day ends. Superstition Mountain Lost Dutchman Museum History of Special musical concert from Domingo DeGrazia this Saturday night This Saturday March , as a very special addition to our annual Mata Ortiz the Magic of Mexican artistry event, Domingo Lost Trail hr hr hr Getting Here Getting to Lost Trail Powder Mountain is easy Conveniently located just of a mile off Hwy and Hwy at the Montana Idaho border. Lost Mountain Baptist Church Helping people to grow in Jesus Lost Mountain exists to help people to have a growing relationship with Jesus Would you join us this Sunday and come to know Jesus . LOST MOUNTAIN CAMPGROUND, INC. Our campground adjoins state park lands for easy access to hiking trails, swimming, fishing, and sight seeing Nearby facilities also include rafting, mountain biking, and golf. Mountain of Terror Lost Valley Hours Normal Hours Mon, Tues, Thurs pm pm Wed pm pm Fri pm pm Sat am pm Sunday am pm Maine Family Snow Tube Park Friday p p Sat Sun am pm Lost Mountain Crossings, Publix Super Markets Savor More Shortcuts Skip to the good part with Publix Online Easy Ordering there s no line online and save even time with your own Publix account View your history or favorite orders and add what you want to your basket in one quick click. Haystack Mountain Ski Area, VT New England Lost Ski Haystack Mountain Ski Area Wilmington, VT History Layout By The Year Memories Recent Photos Many thanks to Jeremy Clark who wrote up this article History Though perhaps best known as Mt Snow s sister ski area, Haystack Mountain enjoyed its own rich history. Lost Valley Canoe Lodging Outfitters for the Buffalo Lost Valley Canoe Lodging offers canoes, kayaks, and rafting on the Buffalo National River We provide vehicle shuttles for floaters and hikers. LOST MOUNTAIN .

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      • Erik Reece John J. Cox Wendell Berry

        Erik Reece John J. Cox Wendell Berry Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia book, this is one of the most wanted Erik Reece John J. Cox Wendell Berry author readers around the world.


    536 Comments

    1. I loved this book! In a single, yearlong case study, Reece follows the obliteration of aptly named Lost Mountain due to strip mining, studying its impact on local communities, businesses and ecosystems. He presents two separate sides of this method of coal extraction. He stimulates a conversation between both the locals who have been devastated by this mining method, and those who thrive off of its economic value. However, it is my opinion that in the conclusion of his book, Lost Mountain, Reece [...]


    2. Mountains are being destroyed in Eastern Kentucky. leveled into "pasturelands"??? Grasslands where the tops of mountains once were?? Woodland species are losing their habitat, people are being posioned by contaminated water supply, homes and lives are being destroyed by the "spoil" coming off the mountain, and overweight coal trucks driven by sleep deprived truckers on narrow mountain roads present a constant threat to residents driving these roads. It is easy to ignore all this when you don't l [...]


    3. Please read this. It will really school you on a pressing, unaddressed issue that affects us all. It had me crying in the public library.


    4. I have researched both sides, and I still give this book five stars. I am so tired of the lame argument that we must still see "coal as our future," until another method can be found. Other methods HAVE been found, but there is so much criminal money tied up in the coal industry, and so many misled goops still rallying behind the coal bosses, that no one with the wherewithal to do so is doing ANYTHING to promote other energy sources. It was enough, for me, that most of the men on the in-laws si [...]


    5. Outstanding book. Shocking on many levels. Shows the devestation of mountain top removal in the search for coal. This book opens the door into the world of strip mining and the devestation it causes to the enviorment and people who live near it. It is sad how we continue to destroy americas rainforest in the search for cheap energy. Highly recommend this book.


    6. Despite this book's tone (casual) and length (short), it was packed with science, statistics, and stories. Reece seemed to be going for some sort of nature essays, but what he ended up with was solid journalism and a very readable, informative book. I wish there was an index, because I've found myself referring back to his research. I really enjoyed this.


    7. AAAAGHHH!!! How is it possible that something like this can happen???? This is a must read for those who care about the environment and where their energy comes from. The author chronicles the disappearance of a mountain during the course of his investigation. CLEAN COAL MY #$@!


    8. This book is an extremely insightful and well written account of the terrible effects of strip mining. Taught me a lot and I would recommend this to anyone who isn't close minded or fucking stupid.



    9. I began this book appreciating Reece's project of documenting the year-long destruction of a mountain to get at its coal. His eye caught the telling details. His turns of phrase were beautiful and sometimes witty but breathtakingly sad. As the book went on, however, I became more and more angry at the people that Kentucky chose to govern it and represent it, who gave every accommodation to Massey Coal and other companies and literally allowed them to get away with murder. One of these elected of [...]


    10. A devastating description of mountaintop removal mining which continues to this day in Appalachia. The author focuses on a single mountain and the impact is clear and relevant. A worthwhile addition to the library of any environmentalist.




    11. "Coal is cheap because it is extracted with the least concern for the land that offers it up." (p. 178)I live in the Appalachian foothills of Ohio. My great-grandfather mined coal on and off for much of his teens and twenties, often on his hands and knees in an underground shaft (he was usually too tall to stand at 6'6"). His family, including my grandmother, lived in company towns that conspired to keep their people poor and dependent. To this day, if you live in my home county, you must have m [...]


    12. I indirectly found out about this book after watching a documentary on “The Real McCoys”, a story about a couple of married teachers from Inez, Kentucky, who took to the streets to protest coal burning and mountaintop removal. Eric Reece was only a blip in passing while they were out protesting, but I caught the title of his book “Lost Mountain” and became curious. I was really taken back by Reece’s book.It was well-written, it was entertaining, it was personal, it was moving. Most imp [...]


    13. I read part of this book for a class I took in college. This book brings to light the actions mining companies are taking to get the resources that they need. In Eastern Kentucky, the mining companies are destroying mountains to get to the coal found in the mountains. The author tells stories of what the people are experiencing. Many of the people living near the mining sites are experiencing sickness and death at high rates. As a country it is time to start the transition from fossil fuels to r [...]


    14. The Lost Mountain is a very good book. Erik Reece did a great job of showing the problems that happen in places in kentucky. He does a very good job of showing examples and many of the problems that occur from the many mining companies. This book is based around the strip mining, and the devastation of the Appalachian mountains. All the data and examples of how these things are harmful are based on a lifetime of experiences. The novel starts out talking about endangered species that are in the m [...]


    15. I liked this book but felt that the Harper's essay he wrote was better. This book wanders too much and Reece spends too much time telling the reader that "it's all connected". I get it and think that it is an important message, but it doesn't need to be given in each chapter. He also spends far too much time taking pot shots at religious people, especially in the conclusion. It's supposed to be about mountain-top removal.Still, there was a lot of good, most of which was covered in the Harper's e [...]


    16. I liked this book but felt that the Harper's essay he wrote was better. This book wanders too much and Reece spends too much time telling the reader that "it's all connected". I get it and think that it is an important message, but it doesn't need to be given in each chapter. He also spends far too much time taking pot shots at religious people, especially in the conclusion. It's supposed to be about mountain-top removal.Still, there was a lot of good, most of which was covered in the Harper's e [...]


    17. I had to read this book in order to teach it for my NKU classes. (NKU chose it as the freshman book for the year.)At first I thought, "Oh, hell. I have to read about coal mining." (And now that I'm in the middle of grading 59 freshman papers on the topic, I am REALLY not enjoying it.) But then it turned out to be really good. Every other chapter is a personal accoung of a mountain, Lost Mountain, that is in KY and is undergoing mountaintop removal for coal. The alternating chapters are mostly in [...]


    18. Great book for anyone interested in ecological studies or Appalachian studies. The author visits Lost Mountain for a period of one year, and he witnesses how the "mountaintop removal" process (e.g strip mining) affects the slope and contours. He also interviews and discusses the topic with local activists, businessmen, and community residents. It's interesting that one chapter will feature a man who lost his garden spot to a slurry spill while the next chapter will feature a diner owner with pic [...]


    19. Overall I thought the book was extremely well written. I was engaged the entire time while reading: so much so that I had almost forgotten it was required reading for a class. I became more and more eager to finish the book with each passing page. Reece has a fantastic balance of educational material and heartbreaking personal accounts of people affected by strip mining. A picture of Lost Mountain, illustrating the changes extremely well, accompanies each chapter. The fact that he did all of his [...]


    20. Lost Mountain is a riveting read, a vivid look into the travesty and devastation of mountain top removal coal mining in Eastern Kentucky. Reece is a poet and a naturalist, and connects the reader to the beauty of the land, which makes its destruction more harrowing. Echoes of Muir, Thoreau, and Berry can be heard throughout. The book also does a good job of painting a picture of the complexity of the issues surrounding coal mining in Eastern Kentucky, with sharp divides between people within the [...]


    21. I really enjoyed this popular account of strip mining in Kentucky. Reece brings the urgency of recognizing the environmental degradation caused by coal powered electricity to the fore. It makes me want to cry to read about the total disregard for nature and people's lives. By contrasting changes in the 'natural world' -- species extinction, forest fragmentation, etc. with the techniques used by the mining industry and the actions of local peoples with the lobbyists and supporters of strip mining [...]


    22. For those who missed this when it was first published in 2006 The current visibilty of debate about radical strip mining (blowing the tops off mountains to get coal)prompts me to point to Erik Reece's absorbing account of a year spent spying on such an oepration. Reece converys the human toll, the frightening power of the explosions, and the acidic devestation of the land --the mountian tops end up in valleys, and streams are blocked; clean-ups are half-hearted; the vegetation the companies plan [...]


    23. A great book. It clearly brings home the horrible destruction brought by mountaintop removal mining, not just for humans but for the thousands of animals that make the mountains their home. The pollution of rivers and creeks, mercury-laden dust and removal of untold numbers of trees from the mountains are graphically described. If you are interested in the environment, I would highly recommend this book. Also hoping they never bring this kind of mining to the mountains of North Carolina!


    24. Very readable, this is the story of mountain top removal coal mining in Kentucky and the way that the coal industry influences so much in Appalachia. There are not very many thing that make me feel violent, but coporate greed and destruction is one of them and this book is a devastating example of this. I felt the same way after watching the documentary The Future of Food, which looked largely at Monsanto.


    25. A much-needed account of the ecological and cultural devastation caused by mountaintop removal mining in eastern Kentucky, western Virginia, and southern West Virginia.In alternating chapters, the author visits a mountain monthly that is being destroyed by coal mining. I prefer the intervening chapters where he visits with the people that are closely involved with mountaintop removal including scientists, local residents, and even some of the miners.


    26. This book is like a slow motion horror story that takes place over the course of a year.And the victim is a mountain.WE'RE KILLING FUCKING MOUNTAINS.That's just, like, maybe the most messed up thing everLLING. A. MOUNTAIN. Well written and easy to read (or at least as easy as anything on this topic can be).


    27. I can't remember when I read this; it has to be at least two or three years ago. This is one of the more sickening and discouraging environmental books I've read. Coal extraction by mountaintop removal in Appalachia has done irreparable damage in a part of the country where the citizens are least able to combat it.


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