Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry

Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry

Jacquie McNish Sean Silcoff / Jun 17, 2019

Losing the Signal The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry In BlackBerry controlled half of the smartphone market Today that number is one percent What went so wrong Losing the Signal is a riveting story of a company that toppled global giants before su

  • Title: Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry
  • Author: Jacquie McNish Sean Silcoff
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 209
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • In 2009, BlackBerry controlled half of the smartphone market Today that number is one percent What went so wrong Losing the Signal is a riveting story of a company that toppled global giants before succumbing to the ruthlessly competitive forces of Silicon Valley This is not a conventional tale of modern business failure by fraud and greed The rise and fall of BlackBeIn 2009, BlackBerry controlled half of the smartphone market Today that number is one percent What went so wrong Losing the Signal is a riveting story of a company that toppled global giants before succumbing to the ruthlessly competitive forces of Silicon Valley This is not a conventional tale of modern business failure by fraud and greed The rise and fall of BlackBerry reveals the dangerous speed at which innovators race along the information superhighway With unprecedented access to key players, senior executives, directors and competitors, Losing the Signal unveils the remarkable rise of a company that started above a bagel store in Ontario At the heart of the story is an unlikely partnership between a visionary engineer, Mike Lazaridis, and an abrasive Harvard Business school grad, Jim Balsillie Together, they engineered a pioneering pocket email device that became the tool of choice for presidents and CEOs The partnership enjoyed only a brief moment on top of the world, however At the very moment BlackBerry was ranked the world s fastest growing company internal feuds and chaotic growth crippled the company as it faced its gravest test Apple and Google s entry in to mobile phones Expertly told by acclaimed journalists, Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff, this is an entertaining, whirlwind narrative that goes behind the scenes to reveal one of the most compelling business stories of the new century.

    Losing the Signal The Untold Story Behind the Losing the Signal is a riveting story of a company that toppled global giants before succumbing to the ruthlessly competitive forces of Silicon Valley This is not a conventional tale of modern business failure by fraud and greed. XV Losing The Signal Lyrics Genius Lyrics About Losing The Signal This song was supposed to be on his The Kid With The Green Backpack studio album which was anticipated to drop around . Review Losing the Signal by Jacquie McNish and Sean Losing the Signal The Untold Story The Financial Times and its journalism are subject to a self regulation regime under the FT Editorial Code of Practice Close Financial Times. Losing The Signal Jacquie McNish Hardcover Losing the Signal is the riveting, never before told story of one of the most spectacular technological upsets of the st century Unlike Enron, which was undone by its executives illegal activities, or Lehman Brothers, which collapsed as part of a larger global banking crisis, BlackBerry s rise and fall is a modern day tale of the unrelenting speed of success and failure. Losing the Signal Home Facebook Losing the Signal is a good old fashioned insider s business narrative, the kind we don t see enough of these days, and it should scare the pants off most CEOs The Wall Street Journal See All XV Losing the Signal ft Jupiter YouTube Nov , Xv Jupiter Losing the Signal Our new desktop experience was built to be your music destination Listen to official albums . Losing The Signal You Exec Losing the Signal provides unique access to many of the key players inside RIM It covers the backstories of founder Mike Lazaridis and his co CEO Jim Balsillie, and the impact of their unique business marriage and dual leadership on the company. Losing the Signal Home Facebook Tomorrow marks three years since Losing the Signal was published Still a great read and available for sale For every winnerdisruption brings a loser, and few lost bigger than the Losing the Signal How BlackBerry s bid to one up the Excerpt from Losing the Signal The Spectacular Rise and Fall of BlackBerry Chapter Storm This was where RIM s quality assurance team tested the limits of new BlackBerry models Phones were thrown in swirling industrial tumblers, shaken by robotic arms, dropped Losing the Signal WSJ If the economy is picking up, someone forgot to tell the radio companies The storied industry seems to be in a long term decline, thanks to competitors like the iPod Some top investors are

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      209 Jacquie McNish Sean Silcoff
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      Published :2018-012-08T08:04:10+00:00

    About "Jacquie McNish Sean Silcoff"

      • Jacquie McNish Sean Silcoff

        Jacquie McNish was born in Peterborough, Ontario, shortly after which she moved with her family through a series of leafy suburbs in the United States and Canada She has spent her professional career in Toronto and New York with The Wall Street Journal and the Globe and Mail She is the author of four books, the latest of which is Losing The Signal, The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry, which she co wrote with Sean Silcoff.When not in the attic writing she likes to cycle along Lake Ontario.


    545 Comments

    1. OK, I admit it, I really love my Blackberry (still). My attempt at the iPhone ended so badly that I gave it to my daughter (who hated it as much as I did and promptly swapped it for an Android), so yes, I'm not a fan of the iPhone, unlike seemingly every other person on the planet. So I've always been curious how a company with such an awesome product as Blackberry could go so wrong.Overall this is a pretty fascinating look into how the fate of RIM played out as driven by the two founders' perso [...]


    2. This is the story of a Canadian Company RIM whose first office was above a bagel store in Ontario. The authors tell the story of visionary engineer, Mike Lazaridis, and an abrasive Harvard Business school graduate, Jim Balsillie. Together they engineered a pioneering packet email device that became the tool of choice for business executives.At the very moment Blackberry was ranked the world’s fastest growing company, internal feuds and chaotic growth crippled the company as it faced the entry [...]


    3. This is a scary book for any successful company founder. It is stunning how quickly you can squander your company by over-confidence and lack of listening.


    4. FascinatingThis book is well written and fast paced. Technology is just a hobby for me but RIM's story is one of triumph but ultimately failure. Regardless of brand loyalty the deeper story was something I never knew and was an interesting read.


    5. Losing the Signal is an enjoyable telling of the rise and fall of BlackBerry, built around the success and eventual failure of Research in Motion's two founders, the visionary engineer Mike Lazaridis and the super aggressive salesman and deal maker Jim Balsillie. The ultimate collapse is due in part to their poor management and bad decisions as they tried to respond to the rapidly changing landscape in the world of mobile communication. With the entry of Apple and Google into the mobile phone ma [...]


    6. An insightful account of the rise and fall of BlackBerry. While its travails may seem self-evident to anyone with an Android or Apple phone, the author reminds the reader just how impenetrable Blackberry's market dominance seemed as recently as 2006. Ultimately, the founders, Balsillie and Lazardis come across as hopelessly inept at running their company-- a classic case of founder's syndrome. The demise of BlackBerry is a painful account, and McNish does a great job detailing every barb along t [...]


    7. This is a great book. Every MBA/Business person should read it. Gives a great account. I couldn't put it down.The only issue is it doesn't give you lessons from this and you have to work it out for yourself. But that was find with me.



    8. An enjoyable read - largely as I feel I have lived through much of it - if only by adjacency.The authors have woven together an entertaining story drawing colour from extensive interviews. From the outset, the challenge facing the authors is to attempt to capture the great promise and heady times of RIM success without overshadowing the current sense of imminent demise. In this the authors manage a solid job - but there is always an implicit sense of 'this was the decision at the time, but we ca [...]


    9. An excellent post-mortem on an erstwhile tech behemoth. I loved the reporting, writing, and insider quotes. This is a meticulously researched yet fast-moving account of bureaucracy and rapid disruption. Well done. (Disclaimer: the publisher sent me a copy of the book for a potential review and/or interview.)


    10. This book provided a very good write up of the rise and fall of RIM/Blackberry. If you're at all interested in what happened I highly recommend this book.


    11. "Losing the Signal" is a very impressive cautionary tale about the emergence of the BlackBerry as the pre-eminent portable mobile device, and its subsequent fall from grace. As the BlackBerry is still widely available and in use around the world, perhaps "fall" is not exactly the correct word, but certainly it has lost its ranking rather precipitously, to be sure. The authors, Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff, do a great job of outlining a series of outright failures that contributed to this decl [...]


    12. I worked at BlackBerry from 2007-2012. I was in a technical role, part of a small group that had a wide scope and interacted with many people at senior levels in the company. I had a close up view of the rise and fall of BlackBerry, joining about a year before the peak and leaving before it hit bottom. (Good timing? I guess so.)I’ve been itching to read this, but was reluctant to pay the full price of $14.99. I’m cheap like that. Finally found it on sale in January.It was fascinating reading [...]


    13. What a great book! Having worked (many years ago) in the wireless business before "wireless" meant phones (beepers and pagers), I have enjoyed following the industry as a consumer. I had long hoped that someone would write this book. I remember when the first BlackBerry hit the market. I remember getting my first work-issued BlackBerry, a 6510, a dozen years ago. I, too, quickly became addicted to my "CrackBerry". I was also one of those people that waited in line, overnight, in 2007 to be one o [...]


    14. I was a big fan of Blackberry a few years ago. This book is a fascinating look at how the people running RIM totally dropped the ball when the Iphone came out. The section on the Storm debacle is amazing. RIM had to rush the phone because they were too late responding to Apple's take on smartphones. They were arrogant. Very interesting how RIM basically screwed over Verizon, it is no surprise that they now have no support in the US. I can't believe that a company that was once so successful coul [...]


    15. If you're interested in the Tech world, this is a pretty interesting story. BlackBerry was a major player in the cell phone and smartphone game, they had a seemingly-unbeatable lead when Apple announced the iPhone in 2007 and took the world by storm. The book tells the story of BlackBerry's amazing rise and their surprising fall. It was a small startup that became a $20 Billion company, matching Apple's start in many ways.


    16. Interesting and captivating read. Speaks of the dangers of growing too quickly, imbalanced incentives, and not ensuring product-market fit. There must be a very substantial other side to this story, because I don't think that RIM would have discounted the necessity of understanding customer values as routinely as this book suggests.


    17. The narrative was great. More than just a story about blackberry, but it's about how a company found a niche offering and the hurdles it needed to overcome. I also learned a lot about the mobile industry as a whole, and found answers to questions that I've had for a while? "Why wasn't BBM offered on iPhones?" You'll learn why.




    18. "Losing the Signal" is the Holy Grail of disruptive tech. You can't put a price on the lessons learned in this book.


    19. A tech darling and downfall, Canadian-style. Light on the technology, and not as thoughtful or reflective as I'd expected, but it is a great walkthrough of RIM's founders, product development, and the turning points for the company and wireless markets.A few lessons from BlackBerry's breakthroughs and near-demise:- RIM grew, but never matured. The leadership, culture, and structure that help small businesses make it big are fundamentally different from the qualities needed for a big company to s [...]


    20. I knew two things about RIM and BlackBerry before I read this book: 1) once upon a time, a lot of people had BlackBerries, and, 2) no one has one now. Since I knew nothing about the company, the book was a little difficult to follow at first because it kept flicking between the childhoods of the founders and I couldn't keep track of who was who. As the book continued, however, things became clearer.It's an entertaining, interesting and scary read. The book is well-researched and contains useful [...]


    21. I admire strong leaders who inspire others around them to give their best for the company. In this case the founders and co-CEOs of this Canadian company led the way and created the largest Tech company in Canada. Great lessons in outmaneuvering the big telecomm companies and carriers, The Art of War concepts were well applied. Even good takeways from their eventual demise the need for a clear leadership structure, get rid of co-ceos who were not able to be good partners, get rid of a Board full [...]


    22. I really enjoyed this book. My Take-aways- striking reminder of how fast we've come in mobile tech in the past 15 years. - never bet against the underlying computing power, network speed, network capacity improving- winners and losers are determined by big macro shifts and who's ahead of those shifts and "gets them right".


    23. Blackberry Curve was the first smartphone which I truly desired, It was to my rookie eyes a truly smart experience. And then came iPhone. I still remember checking my Bank of America balance on iPhone browser and was literally blown away. It was a seas apart from what crap browsing experience was on Blackberry, which lets say was a 'piece of shit' due to lack of better term. And, then came the App Store which multiplied the utility of iPhone manyfolds. Though to be fair, email experience on blac [...]


    24. This book is an inside look at the story of RIM and BlackBerry's beginnings, rapid rise, and rapid decent as told via interviews with the founders and a large assortment of other players in their story. The willingness and honesty of founders Lazaridis and Balsillie in detailing what went on behind closed doors, as well as the interviews with everyone ranging from carrier partners to even as far as people who had been screwed by RIM, is quite astounding. The interviews were conducted separately, [...]


    25. I enjoyed this book. If you remember the ascent and subsequent descent of RIM/Blackberry, you will find this book enjoyable I think.It goes back to the beginning tracing the path of the two founders. Those stories are usually very entertaining and this one is as well.Everything was going great until the iPhone came out. It's funny because even though the founder had read "The Innovator's Dilemma", they still seemed to fall into it. It's hard to put a finger on what they did wrong but I guess if [...]


    26. I loved this description of a Canadian start up that grew up to the stars and then fell hard. Maybe I'm biased because I worked at RIM/BlackBerry for almost 4 years, but there was so much information about the company that I didn't know. I only knew about its history vaguely and even being in the company, often I knew just as much as what appeared in the newspaper. The book mainly is about the period of the two co-CEO's, very little about Thorsten Heins and even less about John Chen. People ofte [...]


    27. As a stalwart BlackBerry fan, this was a painful book to read. I enjoyed the parts about the rise (although disappointed with some of the business tactics employed), and was educated about how the fall ("spectacular" indeed) came about.But I hold onto the hope implicit (to me, anyway) in the book's last sentence:"If the rise and fall of BlackBerry teaches us anything it is that the race for innovation has no finish line, and that winners and losers can change places in an instant."McNish, Jacqui [...]


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