Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune

Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune

Pamela S. Turner Gareth Hinds / Jul 16, 2019

Samurai Rising The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune Minamoto Yoshitsune should not have been a samurai But his story is legend in this real life saga This epic warrior tale reads like a novel but this is the true story of the greatest samurai in Japan

  • Title: Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune
  • Author: Pamela S. Turner Gareth Hinds
  • ISBN: 9781580895842
  • Page: 357
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Minamoto Yoshitsune should not have been a samurai But his story is legend in this real life saga This epic warrior tale reads like a novel, but this is the true story of the greatest samurai in Japanese history When Yoshitsune was just a baby, his father went to war with a rival samurai family and lost His father was killed, his mother captured, and his surviving halfMinamoto Yoshitsune should not have been a samurai But his story is legend in this real life saga This epic warrior tale reads like a novel, but this is the true story of the greatest samurai in Japanese history When Yoshitsune was just a baby, his father went to war with a rival samurai family and lost His father was killed, his mother captured, and his surviving half brother banished Yoshitsune was sent away to live in a monastery Skinny, small, and unskilled in the warrior arts, he nevertheless escaped and learned the ways of the samurai When the time came for the Minamoto clan to rise up against their enemies, Yoshitsune answered the call His daring feats and impossible bravery earned him immortality.

    Samurai Rising The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Community Reviews Samurai Rising The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune has the perfect amount of back and front matter not so much that it s overwhelming, but some really helpful and useful information in understanding the story At the beginning is a list of characters and how to pronounce their names. Samurai Rising The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune However, Samurai Rising has great appeal as military history Turner s action packed accounts of Yoshitsune s daring and courageous feats in battle, both as a fighter and as a leader, and his ensuing meteoric rise through the ranks of the samurai make for compelling reading. Samurai Rising The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune However, Samurai Rising has great appeal as military history Turner s action packed accounts of Yoshitsune s daring and courageous feats in battle, both as a fighter and as a leader, and his ensuing meteoric rise through the ranks of the samurai make for compelling reading. Samurai Rising Summary SuperSummary Samurai Rising opens with a description of the home life of Minamoto no Yoshitsune from infancy onward, his life was all about war In the mid th century, the rules of war did not spare women and children, and it was common for even emperors to be held Samurai Rising Naruto Fanon Wiki FANDOM powered by Wikia Samurai Rising is a currently in production four part fanfiction miniseries set in the era during the Second Great Samurai War, and is intended to give the background to the samurai world and become a foundation for a planned mainstream story, Legacy of the Samurai Consequently, the Samurai Rising series is something of a prequel. Samurai Rising Pamela S Turner He joined his half brother Yoritomo in an uprising against the most powerful samurai in Japan This is the story of insane courage and daring feats, bitter rivalry and fatal love Based on one of the great works of Japanese history and literature, Samurai Rising takes a clear eyed, very modern look at the way of the samurai and at the man who became the most famous samurai of all. Samurai Rising The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Samurai Rising The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Pamela S Turner, Gareth Hinds Minamoto Yoshitsune should not have been a samurai But his story is legend in this real life saga This epic warrior tale reads like a novel, but this is the true story of the greatest samurai in Japanese history. Samurai Rising Final Fantasy Wiki FANDOM powered by Wikia Samurai Rising is an action role playing game for iOS and Android devices, developed and published by Square Enix It features job classes from the Final Fantasy series such as Dragoon and White Mage and variations of classic Final Fantasy enemies such as Malboros and Samurai Rising, by Pamela S Turner The New York Times May , In Samurai Rising, Turner, the author of several nonfiction books for young readers, traces the brutal and thrilling path of this most famous samurai. Samurai Rising Summary Study Guide BookRags Samurai Rising Summary Study Guide Description When the novel begins, Japan is in the final years of imperial rule Two dominant clans, the Minamoto and the Taira, act as balances to one another while in support of the Retired Emperor, Go Shirakawa, who rules through his young son, the Emperor.

    • Þ Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ Pamela S. Turner Gareth Hinds
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    • thumbnail Title: Þ Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ Pamela S. Turner Gareth Hinds
      Posted by:Pamela S. Turner Gareth Hinds
      Published :2018-09-17T12:34:27+00:00

    About "Pamela S. Turner Gareth Hinds"

      • Pamela S. Turner Gareth Hinds

        I was very interested in books as a child I still remember how hard I worked as a four year old at learning to write my name because my mother promised I could have a library card as soon as I could scrawl PAMELA When my parents made me turn my bedroom lights out at night, I would read by the tiny red light on the temperature control for my electric blanket I grew up in Riverside a rather hot part of Southern California I was forced to sweat through many books, and not just because I was worried about the hero The first thing I can remember wanting to be is a children s author I also loved animals We had a dog and a big outdoor cage full of doves My good friend, Jenny, lived on a dairy farm and it was critter heaven for me We would jump her horses bareback over bales of hay and ride for miles in the hills When I was in college I spent a year in Nairobi, Kenya as an exchange student I didn t know much about Africa before I left, but I knew it had lots of wildlife I traveled throughout East and Central Africa and saw lions, elephants, gorillas, Cape buffalo, and many other animals I met my future husband, Rob, in Kenya He was also an exchange student We both loved living in another country I have a B.A in Social Science from the University of California, Irvine, and a Master of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley I ve worked as a legislative assistant for foreign affairs for a California congressman and as a international health consultant Over the years Rob and I lived in Kenya, the Marshall Islands, South Africa, the Philippines, and Japan We have three children, Travis 26 , Kelsey 24 , and Connor 21 Each of them was born in a different country My family and I lived in Japan for about six years, and my children all attended a local Japanese preschool The Japanese mothers at the preschool told me the story of Hachiko I thought it was a wonderful tale When we returned to the U.S I decided I wanted to be a writer, just like I d planned to be when I was four Better late than never Hachiko is famous in Japan, and I thought his story would be a wonderful one to share with English speaking children HACHIKO was my first book Since then I ve written seven GORILLA DOCTORS, LIFE ON EARTH AND BEYOND, A LIFE IN THE WILD, THE FROG SCIENTIST, PROWLING THE SEAS, PROJECT SEAHORSE, and THE DOLPHINS OF SHARK BAY My newest book, SAMURAI RISING, will be coming out in early 2016.We now live in Oakland, California I ve written many science and nature articles for adults and for children Besides reading and writing, I like to scuba dive and snow ski I ve been lucky enough to dive all over the world, including the Caribbean, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, and off California I love diving because you can get closer to big animals underwater than anywhere else Several years ago I began learning kendo Japanese swordfighting along with with youngest son, Connor When I write I am ably kept company by my yellow labrador retriever, Manchee, and my son Connor s cockapoo, Tux They sometimes respond to sit They always respond to cookie We also have a very obese Australian White s tree frog named Dumpy F Lumpy who looks a lot like Jabba the Hut.


    130 Comments

    1. When you read enough children’s books published in a single year, folks tend to believe that you’ve an ability to spot trends in the general literature. Trend-spotting is easy enough when you’re dealing with picture books (hot in 2016: Bears rampaging through picnics and blobfish!) but books written for older readers are trickier. I think I’ve hit on at least one incredibly popular trend for the current year, however: Overwhelming depression and sadness. Whether it’s baby foxes are get [...]


    2. My interest to date in samurai has been close to zero, my tolerance for violence and gore minimal (Game of Thrones had me running in the opposite direction), and being a pacifist I usually find books with endless descriptions of battles and war plans tedious. Yet all of this went out the window when I started Pamela S. Turner's Samurai Rising. Immediately I was besotted, eager to return to it when I was forced to put it down to do other things,  fascinated by the topic, taken by the exciti [...]


    3. A regressive book: a book that adopts elements of the "noble savage" (with a direct comparison to "fiercely independent Comanches" - just look at that cover), a book that glamorizes horrific slaughter and suicide (Yoshitsune is called a "superstar"), a book that smacks of history written by winners (what really make the Minamoto any more deserving of reader sympathy than the Taira?), a "great man" history feting someone whose only notable quality seemed to have been a talent for violence. Two pa [...]


    4. The gripping, epic true story of Minamoto Yoshitsune, the greatest samurai in Japanese history. A rousing, action-packed saga set in 12th century Japan, superbly illustrated by Gareth Hinds, about warriors and bravery, fierce combat, loyalty and treachery, rebellion and revenge. Turner's passion for her subject is apparent and her painstaking research on the subject is obvious from the extensive end matter. A thrilling story and an insightful look into an exotic and dangerous ancient world.


    5. The book is about a person who first starts off with nothing but then becomes a strong samurai and learns valuable lesons.


    6. Lively and all-too-brief biography of Minamoto Yoshitsune. As a child, I was obsessed with Katherine Paterson's Of Nightingales That Weep, which tells of the Heike conflict from the other side, so I recognized a lot of the names and major events, and was fascinated by Yoshitsune's strange and amazing life. I wish she had gone into greater detail, but she would have had to fictionalize it in order to do so, so I will just appreciate what is here. Also, excellent art by Gareth Hinds, who did the g [...]


    7. I made the mistake of reading this book thinking it was fiction, but it is historical nonfiction. Because it takes place in the 12th century there is not much dialogue. Sixty pages of footnotes including the dialogue the author show the difficulty of mixing fact with legend, but Turner handles it well. She adds her own humor making this adventure story hard to put down. I'll be surprised if she doesn't win some nonfiction award.I got lost in the story once I stopped looking for a fiction narrati [...]


    8. Thank you to NetGalley and Charlesbridge for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review."Yoshitsune's only assets were brains, ambition, and a dream. But childhood dreams can change history."I absolutely adore books where I learn something new about history. This does not disappoint in bringing to life a charismatic, intriguing character and shining a light on the rise of samurai as political figures in Japan. The style of writing is somewhere between middle grade and YA so expect a si [...]


    9. Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Pamela S. Turner is a children's nonfiction but it is written so well that it could be for anyone at all. I learned so much and didn't feel it was talking down to me. Through this book you could feel the social life, the strange customs, and the barbaric life it was back then. The role of the warrior and power and family was very powerful things. This books takes you into the background that leads up to Yoshitsune being a samurai, his child [...]


    10. I would've found history fascinating had I read books like this in school. Incredibly researched and written in a style that makes it accessible and interesting to its audience, this book is one that I can't wait to share with older students. Author notes, chapter notes and bibliography are ideal for showing students how nonfiction authors research & use the information in their writing.


    11. This is an excellent work of narrative non-fiction. I love seeing non-fiction for teens that explore a non-western aspect of history or culture. The author uses an underlying tone that is sly, subversive, and snarky adding just the right amount of humor to the story. This is essential because there is a lot of death, dying, and battles over and over again.


    12. Now this is the way to write history! It reads like a bloodthirsty fictional account of samurai doing what samurai do best: fight in creative and bloody ways. Do hand this to any kid in the library who thinks reading is boring and useless, that is, if they like martial arts. Or maybe even if they don't. I'm not a particular fan of the martial arts and found this fascinating. A lot of it was the language. At one point the author said that one person was trying to keep on another person's good sid [...]


    13. An epic life with history behind you and history before you, Turner does an awe-inspiring job of detailing the "epic life of Minamoto Yoshitune" and how samurais became what we know of them today. It is about honor, battle, war and it features severed heads and treachery against your half siblings. No one was really safe including new babies, especially if they were boys and especially if they were the children of hated/feared/loved samurai like Yoshitune. Each chapter has a black and white illu [...]


    14. I think I'm with Leonard on this one. His review is definitely worth a read. I didn't finish this because it felt awfully breezy for the violent subject matter. Do I sound like I'm against nonfiction being fun? I'm really not. I like fun! But a light tone when talking about atrocity is more appropriate for adults who, presumably, get how serious it truly is, even when the violence took place hundreds of years ago. Booklist called this book "pure excitement" and I'm just SMH that senseless violen [...]


    15. Perfect to pair this gripping nonfiction account of real samurai with the fantasy historical novel Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit by Nahoko Uehashi featuring a female samurai. Loved the backup material in Turner's book -- maps, glossary, pronunciation guides, timelines, extensive endnotes, etc. On her website, the author also has a PDF discussion guide to download.


    16. This was well written, fast-paced, compelling, and falls squarely into the category of "not at all for me." I personally found the fight scenes boring, but I know there are teen readers who love these sorts of legends of history, especially about samurai, who will eat this up. Excellent backmatter and the illustrations throughout add a nice touch.


    17. I'm a little disappointed. This had great reviews when I ordered it for the library, but I really didn't like the writing style.


    18. Fascinating narrative nonfiction! I dreaded reading this required book, totally turned off by the subject matter, the cover, and, especially, the complicated "Characters and Places" page that greeted me at the start. I almost cheated on this book--would my students REALLY know if I skipped it? I'm glad I am honest and have integrity--this book was by far the best nonfiction I've read in at least 10 years. Totally accessible, intriguing, beautifully written with a good amount of sass. More Pamela [...]


    19. Somewhere between four and four and a half stars. On the whole, an impressively -- and sometimes playfully --written version of a story I knew nothing about. My reservation, and one I feel strongly, is that the historical and social context needed to be set better at the beginning. The assumption is that the reader knows who and what samurai were -- but is that correct? I'm not sure that I do. While I ended the book knowing more than I did in the beginning, I ended still wondering whether I was [...]


    20. If you're writing a nonfiction book about a twelfth century samurai, most of your source material will be military record. This should have occurred to me, but it didn't prior to starting this book. It was very well written, and beautifully illustrated by Gareth Hinds, but it was lacking the kind of detail that makes history interesting to me. Turner did an amazing job of sticking to the facts while filling them in with narrative and what she could surmise, but unfortunately, I just didn't reall [...]


    21. Samurai Rising by Pamela S. Turner was a really cool historical fiction book about a Samurai named Minamoto Yoshitsune. Minamoto grew up in a temple after the rest of his family was killed, but he soon saw that his true life purpose was to become a Samurai and regain his father's honor. It was a long, hard road with many hidden enemies, but Minamoto was not about to give up. The main themes were betrayal, trust, and power. Samurai were meant to protect everyone, but really their culture had more [...]



    22. "Few warriors are as famous as the Japanese samurai. We remember those beautiful swords and those fearsome helmets. We recall, with both horror and fascination, how some chose to end their own lives. But no one can understand the samurai without knowing Minamoto Yoshitsune."Samurai warriors occupy an unusual space between actual history and the stuff of legend. Immortalized in countless books and films, these warriors are sensationalized and idealized but rarely studied as historical figures.Sam [...]


    23. I have heard some great things about Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune, including some Newbery buzz on Fuse #8, so I decided to check it out. It's touted as a "real-life A Game of Thrones," but for middle-grade plus. Well, I have neither read nor watched A Game of Thrones or anything in the Song of Ice and Fire series because it's just way too violent and rape-y for me, so I really can't compare it at all. But it's very interesting that this has a ton of violence in it (accord [...]


    24. Is Samurai Rising bad for America?Taira leaders quickly decided that only "men of quality" would be allowed on the ships. Low-ranking samurai who tried to climb aboard by clutching the sides of the vessels had their arms slashed off, "and they ended as rows of corpses, reddening the water's edge at Ichi-no-Tani." (p. 72)A teenaged boy stared up at him The Minamoto warrior promised Atsumori he would offer prayers for the soothing of the boy's soul. Then, weeping, he killed the youth and sliced of [...]


    25. First reviewed on LiterariteaWhat It Is: BiographyWhat It’s About: Twelfth century samurai Minamoto Yoshitsune’s turbulent life and the rise of the samurai culture. Yoshitsune was one of the early samurai to practice a ritual (and gory) suicide in order to avoid being captured by the enemy. But his life up until that point was no less peaceful. On the run from birth, he found refuge first in a monastery and later in wealthy estate before taking on a leadership role in his family. But as his [...]


    26. I am a fan of Candace Fleming and Steve Sheinkin so I was looking forwarding to adding another favorite nonfiction author to the group but I was disappointed with Pamela Turner's book. I found it confusing and the writing dull. I think it would be the rare student that would stick with this book to the end. It did give me some insight into what it must be like to be an ELL reader since the names, locations and culture were so foreign that it made the reading choppy and a little frustrating.


    27. Everything I heard was true. Non-fiction, bio, reads like fiction and full of fascinating tidbits. People rarely died of natural causes (says so on the back cover).


    28. SAMURAI RISING by Pamela Turner tells the legendary story of Minamoto Yoshitsune.Set in twelfth century Japan, young Yoshitsune is just a baby when his father is killed and his mother captured by a rival family. While living in a monastery, Yoshitsune learns warrior arts, becomes a samurai, and defeats his enemies.Blending historical facts with classic literature, the author successfully creates a biography that’s both engaging for readers and based on actual people, places, and events. The fa [...]


    29. It's difficult to explain my enjoyment of history to someone who only associates the subject with dry facts and dates. That stuff is part of history of course, but for me history is really about people who perform deeds so remarkable that their stories are passed down over hundreds and thousands of years. And "Samurai Rising" is a young adult book that does an excellent job of reinforcing this point of view."Samurai Rising" details the seminal point in Japan's history when an indolent class of a [...]


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