Our Kind

Our Kind

Kate Walbert / Mar 20, 2019

Our Kind A thought provoking novel that opens a window into the world of a generation and class of women caught in a cultural limbo From the award winning author of The Gardens of Kyoto comes this witty and in

  • Title: Our Kind
  • Author: Kate Walbert
  • ISBN: 9780743245609
  • Page: 436
  • Format: Paperback
  • A thought provoking novel that opens a window into the world of a generation and class of women caught in a cultural limbo.From the award winning author of The Gardens of Kyoto comes this witty and incisive novel about the lives and attitudes of a group of women once country club housewives today divorced, independent, and breaking the rules In Our Kind, Kate WalbertA thought provoking novel that opens a window into the world of a generation and class of women caught in a cultural limbo.From the award winning author of The Gardens of Kyoto comes this witty and incisive novel about the lives and attitudes of a group of women once country club housewives today divorced, independent, and breaking the rules In Our Kind, Kate Walbert masterfully conveys the dreams and reality of a group of women who came into the quick rush of adulthood, marriage, and child bearing during the 1950s Narrating from the heart of ten companions, Walbert subtly depicts all the anger, disappointment, vulnerability, and pride of her characters Years ago we were led down the primrose lane, then abandoned somewhere near the carp pond Now alone, with their own daughters grown, they are finally free and ready to take charge from staging an intervention for the town deity to protesting the slaughter of the country club s fairway geese, to dialing former lovers in the dead of night Walbert s writing is quick witted and wry, just like her characters, but also, in its cumulative effect, moving and sad Our Kind is a brilliant, thought provoking novel that opens a window into the world of a generation and class of women caught in a cultural limbo.

    Our Kind of Traitor Our Kind of Traitor is a satisfying, but unremarkable thriller Some of the plot points seem highly implausible and others feel underwritten The story is well constructed, but the acting except for Skarsgrd s is listless and the entire film suffers from a lack of tension. Our Kind Life Thanks for visiting Our Kind Life We are Heather and Martin We both work full time jobs, but do our best to travel the world, eat plants, and go on adventures. Our Kind by Kate Walbert Mar , Our Kind A thought provoking novel that opens a window into the world of a generation and class of women caught in a cultural limbo From the award winning author of The Gardens of Kyoto comes this witty and incisive novel about the lives and attitudes of a group of women once country club housewives today divorced, independent, Our Kind A Novel in Stories Kate Walbert Our Kind is a brilliant, thought provoking novel that opens a window into the world of a generation and class of women caught in a cultural limbo. Our Kind of Traitor Fandango Our Kind of Traitor Movie Clip Dima and Perry Our Kind of Traitor Synopsis While on holiday in Marrakech, an ordinary English couple, Perry and Gail , befriend a flamboyant and charismatic Russian, Dima, who unbeknownst to them is a kingpin money Our Kind by by Kate Walbert Summary and reviews Book Summary Walbert s writing is quick witted and wry, just like her characters, but also, in its cumulative effect, moving and sad Our Kind is a brilliant, thought provoking novel that opens a window into the world of a generation and class of women caught in a cultural limbo. Our Kind Who We Are, Where We Came From This item Our Kind Who We Are, Where We Came From, Where We Are Going Set up a giveaway Customers who viewed this item also viewed Page of Start over Page of This shopping feature will continue to load items In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading. Our Kind of Traitor film Our Kind of Traitor film Starring Ewan McGregor, Naomie Harris, Stellan Skarsgrd, Damian Lewis, and Alicia von Rittberg, the film was released in the United Kingdom on May by Lionsgate. Our Kind of Love by Elham Ehsas Azeem Bhati Drama Our Kind of Love is a refreshing alternative to the refugee narrative in how it explores cultural differences through romance, with a bit of hope Set cheekily against the backdrop of a Japanese sushi restaurant, an Afgani bride to be is quite literally a fish out of water in Not Our Kind The Problem of Book Reviewing Through Tribal You probably saw it in the news, in the dueling op eds, in the outrage that swirled around it But the story is still worth revisiting as a microcosm, a little diorama, of our cultural situation.

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    About "Kate Walbert"

      • Kate Walbert

        Kate Walbert was born in New York City and raised in Georgia, Texas, Japan and Pennsylvania, among other places She is the author of A Short History of Women, chosen by The New York Times Book Review as one of the ten best books of 2009 and a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize Our Kind, a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction in 2004 The Gardens of Kyoto, winner of the 2002 Connecticut Book Award in Fiction in 2002 and Where She Went, a collection of linked stories and New York Times notable book.She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fiction fellowship, a Connecticut Commission on the Arts fiction fellowship, and a Dorothy and Lewis B Cullman Fellowship at the New York Public Library.Her short fiction has been published in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, The Best American Short Stories and The O Henry Prize stories.From 1990 to 2005, she lectured in fiction writing at Yale University She currently lives in New York City with her family.


    651 Comments

    1. Onvan : Our Kind - Nevisande : Kate Walbert - ISBN : 743245601 - ISBN13 : 9780743245609 - Dar 208 Safhe - Saal e Chap : 2004


    2. With its unusal plural narrator ("we"), Walbert made an excellent choice of the group of women who would be narrating this novel: post-divorce women in the late 1950s, held together by their mutual social restrictions. Walbert pinpoints the moment in history that is the cusp of the feminist movement and personifies it in these women: the yearning for more than is their lot in life.One of Walbert’s most impressive achievements with this book is the way that it both pillories these women of priv [...]


    3. Our Kind tells the story of a group of women, either divorced or widowed, in their post-marriage lives. They share their histories, their memories of marriage and children, and we witness what it is they are doing with their lives now—which, they feel, isn't much of anything at all.I wasn't overly impressed with it, to be honest. I admire Walbert's writing style—I suspect that's the reason it was a National Book Award finalist (I have high expectations of this award). But the story itself di [...]


    4. The message here would appear to be that a woman has (had?) two choices: she can either work on herself / her education and end up alone OR she can marry and have children, meanwhile becoming shallow and "fuzzy-minded." The final twenty or so pages rather sums this up.Are we supposed to like these women?? They are total wastes of space, with their pools and their booze and their cigarettes (that they crush under their heels and leave for - who? the pool boy, perhaps? - to pick up). And their dau [...]


    5. What a great surprise! I just picked up this book randomly at the library. It may be a 4.5. My only issue is that the flashbacks/characters were sometimes confusing. This is a subtle work of feminism. A story of a group of women "of a certain age" all married in the 1950s (ish) then divorced etc. looking back on their lives, friendships and children. While it's not hard hitting and doesn't tackle things head on its a beautiful glimpse of women. Each chapter is a tiny piece of one of the the wome [...]


    6. It's not that this book was bad, it just wasn't my kind of book. I knew that when I started it, but for some reason that didn't stop me. Maybe because it was short? Maybe because I wanted to make sure what I thought my tastes are, actually are my tastes? Actually, the one in the middle about the women in the hospice reading Virginia Woolf was good. What is it about the terminally ill that just won't let them stay on-topic? I think this is the only book I've read in the first-person plural. Becau [...]


    7. I'm not really sure what I thought of this novel. It's the story of several aging women who socialize with one another, being "of a certain age," but they carefully avoid any kind of meaningful intimacy. I think the distance that the author places between her characters and the readers is part of that lack. Also, if you are careful, you can trace each of the women's vulnerability through her path of disappointment, carefully masked behind cocktails and motherhood. I would like very much to discu [...]


    8. The inner lives of suburbia women can, in the hands of some authors, be so dark, so evocative/disturbing, so hearbreaking -- all good! I have little patience for art that doesn't give me pain and/or humor and/or inspiration and/or love. This book fits into the Anne Tyler BORING category. I hung in there hoping it would pay off but -- nope. Sometimes escaping into others' lives can be such a drag.


    9. The stories in the book jumped around in time and place the way my brain roves at 3am--not something I would think of inflicting on others. There seemed to be no need to keep the charachters straight, which made it hard to feel any connection to their story. I had trouble convincing myself to keep reading, and probably would not have done so if the book hadn't been so short.


    10. 2009 #25: This book was just not very good. It provides snapshots of women's lives post-divorce in suburban America. The problem was that I just didn't care about any of the characters, so I didn't care about what happened to them. If you are thinking of reading this, I would say don't bother.


    11. It was a story of women who married and had children in the '50's and now divorced were again trying to have control of their lives and destinies. The story is told in a series of reflections on the past and how they came to where they are now. It is also told through present day events and the boldness they feel given the past to act on their feelings. A nice story but not a grabber.


    12. Not crazy about this book or its structure -- series of anecdotes with recurring themes and characters. Not enough character development. I would give it 2.5 stars if I could.



    13. This is another item from the "Voice" section of /More Book Lust./ By voice, MBL means unusual points of view. In this case, the unusual point of view is first person plural. The story jumps back and forth in time, a chapter by chapter. At the end of the book it suddenly slips into standard third person omniscient, to tell the earliest and the latest episodes. To me, the first person plural seemed like a novelty, used mainly to disguise the fact that the story is thin and outdated. There have be [...]


    14. I liked that this was a compilation of related stories; however, the stories never really moved a plot forward. This made me a little sad because the women basically are all closet alcoholics or worse. They are just all cynical, depressed women.


    15. I didn't like this book at first. And I never got all the characters sorted out. But Walbert's writing pulls and remains in the mind. Each story could stand on its own, but the impact accumulates as each new telling reveals more.These are women, I think, of my mother's generation, or maybe a bit younger, of a time when marriage and family were givens for a woman's life, brides of the 1950's. And yetey seemed to be distorted versions of the women and families I knew, perhaps because their lives s [...]


    16. Kate Walbert's 2004 novel, Our Kind, is unusual in every sense. It's not long—a comfortable 195 pages, but it is complex and deep, tackling a topic we often neglect to address: What happened to the country club wives of the 1950's when the world outgrew them?The narrative is told as a collective first person, we, and sometimes addresses the reader directly: "Know that we are a close-knit community."The narrator is the women of a small New England town. "We were married in 1953. Divorced in 197 [...]


    17. This slim volume (195pp) is a “novel in stories” which means it’s ten (related) stories about a group of rich, American, east coast, widows/divorcees who are now, in their 60s/70s, looking back (rather selfishly) at the (rather self-centred) lives they led in the 1950s and 1960s (when their children were young and they spent their days around at each others’ houses, smoking and drinking), and also ruminating on the empty lives they lead now (husbands dead or divorced, daughters grown int [...]


    18. This book is a quick read and has some beautiful writing, and in many ways is reminiscent of Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout, which I recently read, in that it is a collection of stories which jump back and forth in time about a group of people reflecting on their lives and themes of regret and disappointment as characters progress into old age are explored. However, this collection of stories is very disjointed while the characters are hardly ever fleshed out and all seem to merge into one [...]


    19. A "library grab" that struck me as interesting, partly because it seemed to deal with women who were of my mother and mother-in-law's generation. I haven't read any of Kate Walbert's writing before this, but found her spare style to be fairly effective. The reader is left to infer much about the characters and action, but having something left to one's imagination isn't always a negative and, in fact, caused me (in the case of this series of short stories that nevertheless left an impression of [...]


    20. It's disappointing that so many people have marked this two stars or less - I know first person plural is not the easiest perspective to write or read in, but it is perfect for the story Walbert is telling. At times it wanders and waffles and there is basically no plot, I will say that, but that isn't a failing, because Walbert isn't hugely concerned with plot to begin with. Instead she paints a picture of a group of women burned out, potential squandered, abandoned by their children, trapped in [...]


    21. I admire Kate Walbert’s work for its clearly feminist perspective. In her novel in stories, OUR KIND, she writes in the collective voice (using the first person plural ‘we’) about a group of upper middle class divorced suburban women getting on in age. These women raised families in the fifties and sixties and, now alone, are testing new limits, getting feisty, refusing to play by the rules that have not served them well. We visit the pain of love and marriage gone wrong, of children who h [...]


    22. I really liked Kate Walbert's "A Short History of Women" so was excited to find this one from 2004. Not quite as excellent. Well written and you can see her style emerging, but I had difficulty feeling sympathy or connection with the setting and the characters--a bunch of essentially aimless, helpless wives and mothers in the rich New York suburbs in the mid 20th century. Sad times for these pre-feminist women in so many ways--interesting exercise to try to write stories about them, but just isn [...]


    23. Not my favorite novel by the author. Those would be Gardens of Kyoto and A Short History of Women. However, this novel is a great reflection of a generation of women often overlooked beyond their role as homemaker. The novel looks at what has become of the 1950s housewife once she is divorced and her children have grown. It's a novel of reflection and self discovery nicely concluded as Walbert always does. Poetic prose that will also entertain. Don't let this be your introduction to Walbert but [...]


    24. Am I aging? Am I middle aged? Am I in store for the life the women of this book have led? Sure, I have led a life with boundaries beyond marriage and motherhood. But I am married and who knows what's to come. In old age I hope I will have prepared myself for better uses of idle time than they did. I hope I will get there with a sense of worth and purpose more in tact that these women had. And most of all I hope I still have my best friends with me like they did.


    25. It was okay, but I had a hard time liking or relating to the characters. They seemed unremittingly selfish and distant. Maybe I just run in different crowds, but I don't know anybody like that so it seemed unrealistic and not very engaging. The prose itself was well done, but I had a hard time motivating myself to finish it.


    26. I READ "Off Keck Road", "Easter Parade" and "Our Kind" sequentially as recommended by Nancy Pearl. It was an interesting contrast of various authors telling of the lives of groups of woman some who were friends and some were family members. I enjoyed the experiment and think it enhanced each book to have the contrast with the others.


    27. Walbert pulls off a difficult effort here (in one of her earlier works); this is a second person plural collection that uses linked stories to capture an era and a suburban lifestyle in impressionistic moments in the lives of a small circle of women. And it works. It's a bit hard to wholly capture the various players but all in, this is stylistically adventurous and wonderfully well-written.


    28. Propelled by Walbert's stark and poetic voice, a cadre of white upper middle class women float through college, marriage, motherhood, midlife crises and so on in this startling collection of related short stories.


    29. Loved it! The best one I've read for a while. It's a collection of stories, I suppose, but could also be read as a novel (like The Things They Carried). A perfect example of how a collective narrator can really work.


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