The Green Mile, Part 4: The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix

The Green Mile, Part 4: The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix

Stephen King / Jul 23, 2019

The Green Mile Part The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix The Green Mile tells the story of two men a prison guard and his new death row inmate and their suddenly intertwined lives What would it be like to walk those last yards to the electric chair kn

  • Title: The Green Mile, Part 4: The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix
  • Author: Stephen King
  • ISBN: 9780451190550
  • Page: 401
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • The Green Mile tells the story of two men, a prison guard and his new death row inmate, and their suddenly intertwined lives What would it be like to walk those last 40 yards to the electric chair, knowing you were going to die there What would it be like to be the man who had to strap the condemned man in or pull the switch What would such a job take out of you, or eveThe Green Mile tells the story of two men, a prison guard and his new death row inmate, and their suddenly intertwined lives What would it be like to walk those last 40 yards to the electric chair, knowing you were going to die there What would it be like to be the man who had to strap the condemned man in or pull the switch What would such a job take out of you, or even add The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix Time has run out for one of the inmates at the Cold Mountain penitentiary Eduard Delacroix is set to take that final walk down the Green Mile But first he must say good bye to the guards, to his fellow inmates, and to a strange creature that forever changed his life Little does he know of the terrible fate that awaits him, and of a devilish plan of revenge.

    The Green Mile Dec , The Green Mile is one of my favorite Stephen King books and I have read it several times I was anxiously anticipating the film version, but was concerned that the emotional impact of the book could not be replicated on screen. The Green Mile film The Green Mile Rotten Tomatoes The Green Mile is an amazingly soulful movie that features strong acting from an incredible cast Frank Darabont directs another prison movie with style and humanism. Watch The Green Mile Prime Video The Green Mile just had to be watched again, and maybe again after that I fist saw it as a first run release I had considered seeing it a second time, but that s not really me to repeat a movie. The Green Mile by Stephen King The Green Mile, Stephen King The Green Mile is a serial novel by American writer Stephen King It tells the story of death row supervisor Paul Edgecombe s encounter with John Coffey, an unusual inmate who displays inexplicable healing and empathetic abilities. The Green Mile Official Site The Green Mile Death Row Gallery Previous Next Next Disc Digital Releases Previous Movies Aquaman Now Playing in Theaters Pre order to Own it Today Movies Fantastic Beasts The Crimes of Grindelwald Pre order Now Movies Creed II Pre order Now Movies The Mule Now Playing in Theaters Pre order to Own it Today. The Green Mile novel The Green Mile is a serial novel by American writer Stephen King It tells the story of death row supervisor Paul Edgecombe s encounter with John Coffey, an unusual inmate who displays inexplicable healing and empathetic abilities.

    • Best Read [Stephen King] ✓ The Green Mile, Part 4: The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix || [Philosophy Book] PDF ☆
      401 Stephen King
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Stephen King] ✓ The Green Mile, Part 4: The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix || [Philosophy Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Stephen King
      Published :2018-011-22T22:20:22+00:00

    About "Stephen King"

      • Stephen King

        Stephen Edwin King was born the second son of Donald and Nellie Ruth Pillsbury King After his father left them when Stephen was two, he and his older brother, David, were raised by his mother Parts of his childhood were spent in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his father s family was at the time, and in Stratford, Connecticut When Stephen was eleven, his mother brought her children back to Durham, Maine, for good Her parents, Guy and Nellie Pillsbury, had become incapacitated with old age, and Ruth King was persuaded by her sisters to take over the physical care of them Other family members provided a small house in Durham and financial support After Stephen s grandparents passed away, Mrs King found work in the kitchens of Pineland, a nearby residential facility for the mentally challenged.Stephen attended the grammar school in Durham and Lisbon Falls High School, graduating in 1966 From his sopho year at the University of Maine at Orono, he wrote a weekly column for the school newspaper, THE MAINE CAMPUS He was also active in student politics, serving as a member of the Student Senate He came to support the anti war movement on the Orono campus, arriving at his stance from a conservative view that the war in Vietnam was unconstitutional He graduated in 1970, with a B.A in English and qualified to teach on the high school level A draft board examination immediately post graduation found him 4 F on grounds of high blood pressure, limited vision, flat feet, and punctured eardrums.He met Tabitha Spruce in the stacks of the Fogler Library at the University, where they both worked as students they married in January of 1971 As Stephen was unable to find placement as a teacher immediately, the Kings lived on his earnings as a laborer at an industrial laundry, and her student loan and savings, with an occasional boost from a short story sale to men s magazines.Stephen made his first professional short story sale The Glass Floor to Startling Mystery Stories in 1967 Throughout the early years of his marriage, he continued to sell stories to men s magazines Many were gathered into the Night Shift collection or appeared in other anthologies.In the fall of 1971, Stephen began teaching English at Hampden Academy, the public high school in Hampden, Maine Writing in the evenings and on the weekends, he continued to produce short stories and to work on novels.


    614 Comments

    1. And finally we get to the fantasy and horror section of these collected novellas, and what a satisfying inclusion, with resurrection and a really, really grizzly death.It was almost like a comedy of errors with all the things that went wrong, and I guess I'm just a sick and twisted individual to be like some of those watchers in the rows, crowing to their friends how they got to see him burst into flame and all that. I mean, what's the use of having friends if you can't live it up a little and m [...]


    2. If you've seen the film, you'll know how 'bad' the execution of Delacroix is. But reading it? Woahhhhh way more graphic and horrifying. Amazingly written though and descriptively detailed.



    3. This is probably the toughest volume to read for many reasons. 1. Delacroix doesn't just die, King wasn't lying when he wrote the title of this volume2. I hate Percy more than I thought was possible.3. cliffhangersWhy did I do this to myself? Why did I think waiting would be fun? 4.5/5




    4. John Coffey was standing at his cell door, tears streaming from his strange, distant eyes - it was like watching blood run out of some unhealable but strangely painless wound. -Chapter 6The Bad Breath of Eduard Delacroix. That is what I keep calling this by mistake. A beautifully & shockingly written tale.


    5. My favorite part thus far. Moving yet horrifying, all rolled into 60 short pages. I tore through this in one sitting.On to part 5.


    6. Even though you know he's a murderer and burned people, you still felt bad for Del in the end. And Percy has definitely made the list as one of the worst people in literature that I have read about. Seriously that one chapter was so hard to read. I closed my eyes in fear. This was a good one.


    7. Compared to part 3, I might put this book more under as 3.8 or 3.9 stars as I feel it's just a little bit under the 4 stars of "Coffey's Hands". Despite that small tidbit in stars & ratings, I genuinely did like this book. Yet again, the series continues to just grow with intrigue and a mixture of satisfaction/fright for me. The death of Delacroix was very bad and upsetting. My only negative thing about this part of the book, which is why it is a little bit lower than part 3, was that I have [...]


    8. The Bad Death of Eduard Delacroix, aside from the upcoming events of volume six, is to me the saddest of all of the installments. Delacroix is a lovable and sweet french character, even for a murderer. It's really hard to read if you don't expect it from seeing the movie, and if you like Delacroix. When the frenchman arrives to meet his maker via Old Sparky, karma comes around from when he laughed at Percy earlier. I won't spoil it, but let's just say it isn't for the faint of heart. From the bi [...]


    9. Was a good girl and managed to wait a bit before reading this one. Ok, I was asleep, but it counts! A gripping read, especially the death scene. Quite glad I read it before having my tea. I really hope that Percy gets his comeupance. Knowing King's sense of humour, I'm also hoping it will be really horrible.


    10. Oh my goodness, what can I say? The most gruesome by far of the ones I have read. I mean I wasn't surprised but I found it hard to eat the rest of my Christmas breakfast.


    11. King continues to construct a page-turning story with this fourth installment, again closing with a suspenseful plot point that would have driven me crazy if I had to wait a month to resume reading.



    12. “Bar-be-cue! Me and you!Stinky, pinky, phew-phew-phew!”– Wild Bill Wharton’s song about Delacroix’s execution.I saw the movie before I read the books, I’m sorry. If you didn’t know, the movie is based on the book series by Stephen King. It was originally published in six parts, in different books. This part was a really short book but I read the complete serial novel. All six parts in one big book, so I had it all in my hands. I’ll review the series as separate because that’s h [...]




    13. After a tense run-in with an orderly at the old folk's home, it takes Paul time to immerse himself back in the story.The murder of Mr. Jingles incurred widespread anger and horror. Delacroix, who treated Mr. Jingles like his last bastion of sanity and calm, breaks down screening and crying. John Coffey asks for Mr. Jingles to be brought to him, and Paul acquiesces. Turn, everyone on Block E, side from Percy who had left in an air of taunting self-righteousness, witnesses his supernatural healing [...]


    14. This section of the Green Mile will go down as an example of the pinnacle of Stephen King's talent. He is incredible for daring to army crawl through muck in such a brave bold fashion, that as a reader I'm cringing and trembling to readHis courage to let his pen and brain dwell on the details of a sympathetic character's physical demise in an electric chair is horrific and writing gold. This has indelibly made it's mark for me in the canon of works I hold highest from King, and I am so glad I'm [...]


    15. 4.5 If there is a character that I truly "hate" it is Percy Wetmore! He is so mean and vindictive! He believes that because he is the Governor's nephew that he can get away with anything. What he did to Eduard Delacroix during his execution was all because Del laughed at him! With each book, the terror is slowly climbing! Stephen King is getting to you through your mind! I always have goosebumps while reading(and not because it's cold)!


    16. Stephen King shows his talent in making amazing horror novels in the part of the book, with the death of Eduard Delacroix being the most gruesomely detailed death I have ever read. I also got emotional right before Delacroix was executed, especially with the parting between Eduard and Mr. Jingles. Overall, this was a great part of the book.


    17. Every bit as good, better, than the movie, and the movie was spectacular. This series of books is King at his very best. Not horror, nor genre specific really, just wonderful engrossing characters, a great story, great build-up. Just, everything, so good.


    18. This is the fourth release in the Green Mile series and the most like Steohen King. There are some dark moments and people in this episode, but redemption also. I think those qualities are what attracts us to King's writing. Hell of a story and leads my charging in to the episode five.


    19. First of all, the thing that broke my heart at the end of the last one, wow. Major twist. Made me cry and then laugh. Second, the end of this is exactly what I've been suspecting since book one. I really hope something good happens in the end. Somehow. Just sneak it in?







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