George Washington's Rules to Live By: How to Sit, Stand, Smile, and Be Cool! A Good Manners Guide From the Father of Our Country

George Washington's Rules to Live By: How to Sit, Stand, Smile, and Be Cool! A Good Manners Guide From the Father of Our Country

George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post / Aug 19, 2019

George Washington s Rules to Live By How to Sit Stand Smile and Be Cool A Good Manners Guide From the Father of Our Country This innovative gift book allows kids to peek into the mind of George Washington and the than lessons by which he lived his life Modern translations and hilarious caricature illustrations provide

  • Title: George Washington's Rules to Live By: How to Sit, Stand, Smile, and Be Cool! A Good Manners Guide From the Father of Our Country
  • Author: George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post
  • ISBN: 9781426315008
  • Page: 125
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This innovative gift book allows kids to peek into the mind of George Washington and the than 100 lessons by which he lived his life Modern translations and hilarious caricature illustrations provide a lighthearted and fun way to learn about history and good manners at the same time Featuring the Rules of Civility that George Washington learned when he was a child,This innovative gift book allows kids to peek into the mind of George Washington and the than 100 lessons by which he lived his life Modern translations and hilarious caricature illustrations provide a lighthearted and fun way to learn about history and good manners at the same time Featuring the Rules of Civility that George Washington learned when he was a child, this book focuses on 50 of George s maxims, ranging from table manners to polite conversation to being a good citizen Because the Rules of Civility are centuries old, this book also includes translations of the rules into contemporary and witty kid friendly explanations that any young reader can relate to Paired with laugh out loud illustrations, this book is a sure fire guide to amazing etiquette.

    George Washington s Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior By age sixteen, Washington had copied out by hand, Rules of Civility Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation They are based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in Presumably they were copied out as part of an exercise in penmanship assigned by Here are a few of George Washington s Rules of Civility Did you know that George Washington s Rules of Civility, a series of maxims that Fred Barbash Fred Barbash has been with The Washington Post for plus years in a multitude of roles The Rules of Civility George Washington s Mount Vernon George Washington wrote out a copy of the Rules of Civility in his school book when he was about years old Vote for your favorite or comment on which Rule you think is still relevant today. George Washington s Rules of Civility Knowledge House George Washington s Rules of Civility Decent Behavior In Company and Conversation A good moral character is the first essential It is highly important not only to be learned but to George Washington s Rules of Civility Decent Behavior George Washington s Rules of Civility Decent Behavior When George Washington the first president of the United States of America was about years old, he copied out by hand a list of Rules of Civility Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation The rules are based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in the th century. George Washington s Rules of Civility Decent Behavior in George Washington s Rules of Civility Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation Little Books of Wisdom George Washington on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Copied out by hand as a young man aspiring to the status of Gentleman, George Washington s rules were based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in . George Washington s Rules of Civility NPR George Washington s Rules of Civility George Washington first copied out the Rules of Civility as a schoolboy exercise In the newly published Rules of Civility The Precepts That Guided Our First President in War and Peace, editor Richard Brookhiser says George Washington s Rules of Good Behavior George Washington s Rules of Good Behavior Passage To America, Captured by Indians, Courtship in New England, Daniel Boone Opens Up the West, The Boston Massacre The Boston Tea Party Getting Sick, Battle of George Washington s Rules of Civility That Still July , America s first commander in chief wholeheartedly fought to free his country from tyranny s reign, but when it came to behaving like a king, George Washington was as noble as they came In his youth, Washington put pen to paper to capture Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation. George Washington s Rules of Civility Decent Behavior George Washington to Thomas Jefferson, about By age sixteen, George Washington had copied out by hand, rules of Civility Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation They are based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in .

    • [PDF] õ Free Read ☆ George Washington's Rules to Live By: How to Sit, Stand, Smile, and Be Cool! A Good Manners Guide From the Father of Our Country : by George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post ↠
      125 George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] õ Free Read ☆ George Washington's Rules to Live By: How to Sit, Stand, Smile, and Be Cool! A Good Manners Guide From the Father of Our Country : by George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post ↠
      Posted by:George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post
      Published :2018-012-27T19:00:56+00:00

    About "George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post"

      • George Washington K.M. Kostyal Fred Harper Lizzie Post

        Born in 1732 into a Virginia planter family, he learned the morals, manners, and body of knowledge requisite for an 18th century Virginia gentleman.He pursued two intertwined interests military arts and western expansion At 16 he helped survey Shenandoah lands for Thomas, Lord Fairfax Commissioned a lieutenant colonel in 1754, he fought the first skirmishes of what grew into the French and Indian War The next year, as an aide to Gen Edward Braddock, he escaped injury although four bullets ripped his coat and two horses were shot from under him.From 1759 to the outbreak of the American Revolution, Washington managed his lands around Mount Vernon and served in the Virginia House of Burgesses Married to a widow, Martha Dandridge Custis, he devoted himself to a busy and happy life But like his fellow planters, Washington felt himself exploited by British merchants and hampered by British regulations As the quarrel with the mother country grew acute, he moderately but firmly voiced his resistance to the restrictions.When the Second Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia in May 1775, Washington, one of the Virginia delegates, was elected Commander in Chief of the Continental Army On July 3, 1775, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, he took command of his ill trained troops and embarked upon a war that was to last six grueling years.He realized early that the best strategy was to harass the British He reported to Congress, we should on all Occasions avoid a general Action, or put anything to the Risque, unless compelled by a necessity, into which we ought never to be drawn Ensuing battles saw him fall back slowly, then strike unexpectedly Finally in 1781 with the aid of French allies he forced the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown.Washington longed to retire to his fields at Mount Vernon But he soon realized that the Nation under its Articles of Confederation was not functioning well, so he became a prime mover in the steps leading to the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1787 When the new Constitution was ratified, the Electoral College unanimously elected Washington PresidentHe did not infringe upon the policy making powers that he felt the Constitution gave Congress But the determination of foreign policy became preponderantly a Presidential concern When the French Revolution led to a major war between France and England, Washington refused to accept entirely the recommendations of either his Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, who was pro French, or his Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, who was pro British Rather, he insisted upon a neutral course until the United States could grow stronger.To his disappointment, two parties were developing by the end of his first term Wearied of politics, feeling old, he retired at the end of his second In his Farewell Address, he urged his countrymen to forswear excessive party spirit and geographical distinctions In foreign affairs, he warned against long term alliances.Washington enjoyed less than three years of retirement at Mount Vernon, for he died of a throat infection December 14, 1799 For months the Nation mourned him.


    822 Comments

    1. This is a great book for introducing kids to manners AND history. I particularly like the illustrations that went with each one of Washington's rules and how they were translated into modern English and applied to modern situations. 2016 Jefferson Cup Honor Book


    2. I have it straight from a young mother of four girls - "They love it!" My grand-girls simply love George Washington's Rules to Live By and frequently check out a copy from their public library. Our First President lived during a genteel era and he was a gentleman who moved in the higher echelon of his day - socially and politically. He was, of course, cognizant of how his behavior and those under his care and leadership reflected on who they were and whom they represented. Good manners was not s [...]


    3. This selection of rules by the 1st President is translated for today's youth and illustrated with brief commentary and historical tidbits.Good advice not matter which century you're living in. The artwork is exaggerated to appeal to its intended audience and at times are downright gross, though they do achieve their mission.Back matter includes the complete list of G.W's rules as he wrote them, a selected bibliography, online sources, and notes about the author and illustrator. A nice addition t [...]


    4. Etiquette lives again! And with this funny interesting book, kids may actually learn a few manners. The tone is irreverent and the illustrations CRAZY but the advice is practical and current. The author and illustrator have chosen 50 of The Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation that Washington hand-copied and lived by. Each rule is illustrated,a modern explanation follows and then there are some snippets of facts about Washington himself, early American history or cul [...]


    5. Best $15 I've ever spent!!! I wanted to buy George Washington's 110 Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation for myself. When I found this book in Williamsburg I thought it would be great for my kids. Boy was I right. The kids just can't put this book down. It warms my heart to see them reading and laughing at the hilarious illustrations. This book illustrates 50 of GW's rules and in the back it lists all 110 (so it was a two for one deal). I find myself flipping thoug [...]


    6. "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for tis better to be alone than in bad company."This and many other great bits of wisdom, manners, and chivalry. Some of these are a little outdated, but many of them are very relevant today. My kids loved going through all of the rules to live by and were intrigued by the quirky pictures.Another one of our favorites,"Labour to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire called conscience."


    7. My kids loved the book. And the parents frequently thanked me saying "my daughter told me that she has to try new foods because George Washington said to" or "my son said that he was not allowed to talk mean about others because GW said so".


    8. .I know this illustrator. Fred's an excellent artist and I'm happy he got this little gig.


    9. Would definitely not want to live in the 18th century, but I would vote to reestablish many of these rules. Love the illustrations also.


    10. Great idea but the modern interpretations of the rules fell flat and the illustrations were too jarring/over the top to make up for it.


    11. Let your conversation be without malice or envy, for 'tis a sign of a tractable and commendable naturep. 112



    12. Preferring to push modern baseline casual courtesy, this book actually dismisses etiquette and formal consideration. The idea to put George Washington's rules of civility into modern terms for today's youth is a good one, but the "translations" (modern explanations) of those rules often aren't accurate and the extra comments beneath at times have little or nothing to do with the rule being addressed. Also, the illustrations are frequently too over-the-top and detract from, rather than enhance, t [...]


    13. Some of my favorite rules are ones meant to guide children as they make their way through life. While some of these tips to behave may seem outdated, there is much to cherish and learn from. Written with both wit and grace, every rule is followed by a snippet about how it applied to George Washington's life, serving not only as an amusing commentary but as well a history lesson one of the first founding fathers of our great country.Adorable and cute, this concise book is a must have for every li [...]


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