In the Name of God: The True Story of the Fight to Save Children from Faith-Healing Homicide

In the Name of God: The True Story of the Fight to Save Children from Faith-Healing Homicide

Cameron Stauth / Jun 18, 2019

In the Name of God The True Story of the Fight to Save Children from Faith Healing Homicide A FINALIST FOR THE FRANCES FULLER VICTOR AWARD FOR GENERAL NONFICTIONAn anonymous caller tells a detective in a small Oregon town that a woman has just bitten off a man s finger But the man is not the

  • Title: In the Name of God: The True Story of the Fight to Save Children from Faith-Healing Homicide
  • Author: Cameron Stauth
  • ISBN: 9781250005793
  • Page: 343
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A FINALIST FOR THE FRANCES FULLER VICTOR AWARD FOR GENERAL NONFICTIONAn anonymous caller tells a detective in a small Oregon town that a woman has just bitten off a man s finger But the man is not the victim, the caller says The woman is She s being held by a group of faith healing fanatics who are trying to cure her depression with violent exorcisms Then the detectiveA FINALIST FOR THE FRANCES FULLER VICTOR AWARD FOR GENERAL NONFICTIONAn anonymous caller tells a detective in a small Oregon town that a woman has just bitten off a man s finger But the man is not the victim, the caller says The woman is She s being held by a group of faith healing fanatics who are trying to cure her depression with violent exorcisms Then the detective gets an even ominous message Children in the church have been dying mysteriously for years, and now several are in immediate peril.The caller, a church insider, risks everything to work with detectives and prosecutors to stop faith based child abuse, joined by a mother who d suffered a faith healing tragedy herself and dedicated her life to saving others from it Masterfully written by Cameron Stauth, In the Name of God is the true story of the heroic mission that exposed the darkest secret of American fundamentalism, and the political deals that let thousands of children die at the hands of their own parents legally.Faith healing abuse still continues around the country, but the victory in Oregon has lit the path to a better future, in which no child need die because of a parent s beliefs.

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      Published :2018-012-27T03:00:28+00:00

    About "Cameron Stauth"

      • Cameron Stauth

        Cameron Stauth Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the In the Name of God: The True Story of the Fight to Save Children from Faith-Healing Homicide book, this is one of the most wanted Cameron Stauth author readers around the world.


    857 Comments

    1. I cannot recommend this book too highly. It's a well-thought-out, compassionate, yet hair-raising story of how the faith-healing movement in the United States overstepped the bounds of sanity and became more important than the right of a minor child to get needed medical attention. The author starts all the way back at the beginning, with Mary Baker Eddy and her entire generation of people who wanted to believe God could and would heal any illness or injury with enough prayer and clean living. H [...]


    2. I stayed up past my bedtime finishing this, so this is going to be short. This is a popular account of religious wingnuts won't/don't seek medical attention, and centers on a radical wack-a-doo community nearby, and the ultimately successful attempts to bring them to justice for allowing their children to die. It's kind of odd to read about attorneys and judges you know (by appearance or by reputation). Interesting (although the author is admittedly anti-medical establishment and apparently anti [...]


    3. I would give this 3.5 stars. Fascinating topic, especially given that I know Oregon City (I've been to The Verdict) and I'm familiar with child abuse in Oregon (I've worked with child abuse pediatrician Dr. Leonhardt on a committee). I appreciated the historical aspects of The Followers, and the national efforts noted throughout the book, but I grew tired of the author's cheap shots at Clackamas County. Also near the end of the book the author inserts himself in a way he hadn't throughout and sh [...]


    4. An excellent story about the defeat of religious shield laws around the country that allowed parents to stand by and murder their children through medical neglect. The meat of the story centers in Oregon City, Oregon, a suburb of Portland. Oregon, which at one time boasted the strictest religious shield laws in the country. Because of these shield laws, a number of faith-healing, doctor-shunning churches set up shop in the state. This is the story of how a single, focused activist, a single man [...]


    5. “In the Name of God” is a narrative from reporter Cameron Stauth about the practice of faith-healing, a wide spread religious practice with tragic circumstances. It is an interesting account that, unfortunately, sometimes smacks of bias and non-objectivity. One might ask how anyone could believe the death of children due to familial obstruction is anything but bad. My answer would be that, indeed, such actions would be repugnant to me personally, but there are individuals out there who have [...]


    6. I want to make something clear. This book does not denigrate faith. It does not mock those who pray for healing. It does not call in question why anyone would be of strong faith. What this book does deal with is mainly one church, called the Followers of Christ Church, who believe that the only way to effect healing is to pray. THE ONLY WAY. Not what most of us would do, which would be to see a child who was ill, bring them to the doctor's, and pray for the child's quick recovery. No. Instead th [...]


    7. In the Name of God is an epic book that describes a series of landmark legal cases that changed the way faith-healing churches operated. Faith-healing churches believe that God is the ultimate healer and therefore if they have enough faith they will never be sick. They won't go to doctors or take their children to doctors even if they're dying. Christian Scientists are the most commonly known faith-healing church, but there are many offshoots. In 1977 a woman named Rita Swan lost her son to bact [...]


    8. When I purchase any book, but particularly one from an author with a number of works to his/her name, I expect it to be reasonably edited. This one was chock full of distracting errors, from people whose names changed from page to page (as one example, Patrick’s son went from Paul, to Pat, to Paul, to Pat, and back to Paul again), to extraneous commas, misplaced periods, find/replace errors, and others. Even a good run-through with Word’s grammar/spelling check could have found some of these [...]


    9. This non-fiction title delves into the ramifications of religious shield laws which (thank heavens this is changing) grant protection under the law if a child dies of a treatable medical illness and due to the parents' religious beliefs-- they refused medical care.This touches close to me as a pediatric ER nurse seeing parents refuse some aspects of medical care-- immunizations would be the largest. As a parent, I believe in my right to make decisions for my children, but as a pediatric nurse, I [...]


    10. Perhaps because I live in OC, and am a native Oregonian certain things in this book bothered me more then the general reader. I'll start with my peeves then get to the good stuff that encouraged a 4 star rating. First, no one I've ever met uses terms like clackalackie, clackatucky, clackatraz, etc etc etcetera I think the Portland based author talked to one weirdo who did and ran with it. Many of his descriptions of the general lay out of the area were weird and off but again because I'm local. [...]


    11. As someone who has lived in Oregon City all my life, I can say this book NEEDED to be written. I have gone to school with, my children have gone to school with, and my job puts me in contact with members of this faith every day. While I was never a party to the cases mentioned in the book, I have seen numerous times where a small child from the cult has to deal with the pain of a broken bone with no medical attention, and then the aftermath of a bone that hasn't set correctly, or numerous other [...]


    12. This book will be a long time in my head. I was totally drained at the end after reading it. I have never in my life read a book that sucked me in the court room and the lives of the these people, everyone of them. I knew some of this was going on from the news but i had no idea it was still going on like it is; ALL IN THE NAME OF GOD. People are stupid. They would let their children and adults die because they felt they were holy and yet i have never seen such lying come out of their mouths in [...]


    13. This book is incredibly difficult to put down, which is especially impressive considering the heavy subject and length. Stauth presents a very emotional and personal ethical dilemma in, my opinion, as fair and balanced as he could be. It would be incredibly easy to portray parents who deny their children medical attention as evil and selfish, but Stauth actually made me sympathize with the Followers and explained their faith with care and civility. With that being said, I am very glad that thing [...]


    14. This is a pretty sobering read. I started reading it at my local library where it was on the New Book shelf, and I could not put it down.This is the account of the tireless work of many people to bring protective legislation into place to protect children from the perpetrators of extreme faith healing practices. In heartrending story after story, the author documents cases of gross child abuse, where the parents had been protected under so called "religious shield" clauses. Under the guise of "I [...]


    15. from the library 2015it's hard to put stars on a book about such horrible thingsRob read this carefully and read selected parts to me.Contents: Prologue Genesis -- Part one: The Book of Matthew. 1 The serpent ; 2 God's perfect world ; 3 Death and dismemberment ; 4 The exorcist ; 5 The crime family -- The Book of Judas. 6 Betrayed with a kiss ; 7 The getaway ; 8 The snitch ; 9 Crime scene investigators ; 10 Guilt and innocence ; 11 The wages of sin ; 12 The love of Judas --The Book of Revelation. [...]


    16. I found the first 1/3 of this book to be a great read-- the author's quick history lesson on Christian Scientists was interesting, and at times, pretty funny. The book overall was well-researched, but towards the end, you kind of get the feeling that it's just a sad situation where there's an imbalance, and I was just tired of reading about it after a while. Boy, there were times I really had to put this thing down as to not throw up--and I can't say a book has done that to me maybe ever--and I [...]


    17. Excellent book on modern day faith healing. As a Canadian, this was an eye-opener for me. Insurance companies paying for the laying on of hands while hundreds of kids were allowed to suffer and die from lack of treatment? That religious shield law were implemented on Nixon's watch is not surprising, but that even today parents who allow their children to die often go without prosecution is mind boggling. I understand that the Followers are brainwashed and indoctrinated so that they cannot think [...]


    18. A truly frightening expose of the number of children killed in this country in the name of religion and the protection they receive in the name of religious freedom. This is a topic that few Americans ever hear about, other than once in a while when a big case makes the news. I had no idea, and I'm sure others also are just as ignorant, of how many children are allowed to die while their parents stand by and pray. It's a difficult issue and not one I'd like to adjudicate, but I am very thankful [...]


    19. I picked this book up at the library on a whim (hmmmting title) and found myself unable to let it go until I finished it. Having lived in Oregon and being raised in Idaho, the stories were even more compelling, and sad. It has helped me see the fine line between faith and fanaticism and the great need for more protectors of children. However, the author purposely twisted truth to malign my own faith (LDS)in the book, which caused me to read his writing with a germ of mistrust. Otherwise, I would [...]


    20. Couldn't put this book down because of the author's "whodunit" writing style. I thought it was a pretty balanced presentation. I lend some credence to spiritual healing but also believe in utilizing Western and Eastern medicine. A cautionary tale of having faith so blind it blinds you to everything else, including the health and well-being of loved ones.


    21. This book has a quick pace and is easy to read. It covers many different instances of faith-healing starting in the 1970s through to the recent court cases in Oregon which has led to parents being prosecuted for not seeking medical care for their children. I found the author to be respectful of the parents while still condemning their actions.


    22. A dense, difficult subject. But the author's writing style makes the pages fly by, and turns what could be a depressing collection of trial transcripts into an engaging story of the religious and social evolution of an unfamiliar community. Recommended for anyone who's interested in true crime, religion, and/or medicine.


    23. The story is important because it is remarkable how many children are harmed in these religious cults. A key point of the account is how the fanatics are protected from prosecution by long-standing religious " shield laws." Another case or cases of how much harm is done in the name of religion.


    24. Very interesting but depressing book about faith healers who refuse to take their desperately ill children to doctors and let them die, believing that if they pray over them and anoint them they will get better.


    25. Very interesting and informative. But did not like the constant juvenile renaming of cities or counties constantly.


    26. when a book starts out by disparaging my faith (LDS) and then goes on to disparage someone else's, it doesn't lend a lot of credence to the author's work




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