Ships That Pass

Ships That Pass

Shashi Deshpande / Aug 19, 2019

Ships That Pass A subtle exploration of love and marriage within a murder mystery Ships That Pass tells the story of Tara and Shaan near strangers to each other after fourteen years of being married and Tara s sist

  • Title: Ships That Pass
  • Author: Shashi Deshpande
  • ISBN: 9788129119582
  • Page: 239
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A subtle exploration of love and marriage within a murder mystery Ships That Pass tells the story of Tara and Shaan, near strangers to each other after fourteen years of being married, and Tara s sister, Radhika, recently engaged, almost on a whim, to someone she barely knows Even as Radhika tries to understand how a once ideal marriage has come undone, and struggles witA subtle exploration of love and marriage within a murder mystery Ships That Pass tells the story of Tara and Shaan, near strangers to each other after fourteen years of being married, and Tara s sister, Radhika, recently engaged, almost on a whim, to someone she barely knows Even as Radhika tries to understand how a once ideal marriage has come undone, and struggles with her own feelings for an older man, tragedy strikes Tara dies in mysterious circumstances and Shaan is arrested for murder In the aftermath, Radhika realizes that while life may seldom turn out as expected, the only hope lies in finding the courage to take one s chances A meditation on the nature of love and marriage, this subtle novella is vintage Shashi Deshpande A mesmerizing writer.you can never walk away from her stories About the AuthorShashi Deshpande, daughter of the renowned Kannada dramatist and Sanskrit scholar Shriranga, was born in Dharwad She studied economics in Mumbai, then moved to Bangalore, where she gained a degree in law Her writing career began in 1970, initially with short stories, of which several volumes have been published She is also the author of eight novels, the best known of which are That Long Silence, which won the Sahitya Akademi award and is considered a landmark in Indian writing in English The Dark Holds No Terror Small Remedies Moving On and The Country of Deceit.

    ships that pass in the night Wiktionary Apr , ships that pass in the night pl plural only simile Two or people who encounter one another in a transitory, incidental manner and whose relationship is without lasting significance two or people who almost encounter one another, but do not do so. Ships That Pass in the Night Meaning and Usage Origin The poem reads, Ships that pass in the night, and speak each other in passing, Only a signal shown and a distant voice in the darkness Here, the passing ships tell the readers about the people who see each other for the first time, and only for a short duration, before parting ways, disappearing into the vastness of the earth. Ships That Pass by Shashi Deshpande Ships That Pass tells the story of Tara and Shaan, near strangers to each other after fourteen years of being married, and Tara s sister, Radhika, recently engaged, Ships that pass Anna Belfrage He looked at her quizzically, not recognising the ships names The sea can be fickle, I grant, and you must treat her with the greatest respect She can be all those things, but the sea and a ship, to some, mean freedom and dignity You treat sea and ship like a mistress, with care and attention. Ships That Pass in the Night TV Tropes Ships That Pass in the Night So you like to ship Bob and Alice The only problem you have is the fact that Bob and Alice have exchanged little than a few lines with one another, there seems to be little to no interaction between the two, or they may be no evidence that they ve ever met each other This is when Ships Pass in the Night. Ships that pass in the night Define Ships that pass in ships that pass in the night Individuals who are rarely in the same place at the same time For example, Jan works the early shift and Paula the late shift they re two ships that pass in the night This metaphoric expression comes from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow s poem The Theologian s Tale published in Tales of a Wayside Inn, . Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Ships that pass in the night Ships that pass in the night, and speak each other in passing, only a signal shown, and a distant voice in the darkness So on the ocean of life, we pass and speak one another, only a look and a voice, then darkness again and a silence Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Author Profession Poet Nationality American Born February , . Be like ships that pass in the night Idioms by The Free be like ships that pass in the night Of two or people, especially those who live together, to not see each other very often to not be in the same place at the same time very often Ever since Georgina started managing the restaurant at night, she and I have been like ships that pass in the night. What writer coined the phrase Ships that pass in the night In part three, section four, the poem reads, Ships that pass in the night, and speak each other in passing, Only a signal shown and a distant voice in the darkness Critics, writers, and others have told us this poem is used as a metaphoric expression. What does the idiom Like two ships passing in the night Yours is an alternative form of the original Ships that pass in the night Originally it was a metaphor invented by the English poet Longfellow, if I remember correctly Originally it was a metaphor invented by the English poet Longfellow, if I remember correctly.

    • Best Read [Shashi Deshpande] ¼ Ships That Pass || [Classics Book] PDF ☆
      239 Shashi Deshpande
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    About "Shashi Deshpande"

      • Shashi Deshpande

        Novelist and short story writer, Shashi Deshpande began her career with short stories and has by now authored nine short story collections, twelve novels and four books for children Three of her novels have received awards, including the Sahitya Akademi award for That Long Silence Some of her other novels are The Dark Holds No Terrors , A Matter of Time , Small Remedies , Moving On , In The Country of Deceit and Ships that Pass Her latest novel is Shadow Play.Many of her short stories and novels have been translated into a number of Indian as well as European languages She has translated two plays by her father, Adya Rangacharya, Shriranga , as well as his memoirs, from Kannada into English, and a novel by Gauri Deshpande from Marathi into English.Apart from fiction, she has written a number of articles on various subjects literature, language, Indian writing in English, feminism and women s writing which have now been put together in a collection Writing from the Margin She has been invited to participate in various literary conferences and festivals, as well as to lecture in Universities, both in India and abroad She was awarded the Padma Shri in 2008.List of books by Shashi DeshpandeDark Holds No Terrors 1982 That Long Silence 1989 A Matter of TimeMoving OnSmall RemediesShadow Play 2013 The Narayanpur IncidentIf I Die TodayIn the Country of DeceitThe Binding VineShips That Pass 2012 The Intrusion And Other Stories3 Novels A Summer Adventure, The Hidden Treasure, The Only WitnessCome Up Be DeadCollected Stories Volume 1 Collected Stories Volume 2 Writing from the Margin And Other Essays


    783 Comments

    1. This book seemed interesting at the outset. What can you really know about a person that you "arrange" to marry? What can you know about a person that you "love" and then marry, and possibly the difference?This book throws up some thought provoking questions, but no hint of the answers. It's a kind of murky who-dunnit, with lots of greys, and a possibly trite ending. Alls well that ends well and all that, but the premise, and the book jacket, perhaps are more powerful than the finished book.This [...]


    2. While the other girls in her group were busy chalking out their future plans post their graduation, Radhika wasn’t sure what she wanted from life. On an impulse she urges her brother to find a match for her because she feels it is best to get married. On a whim she agrees to marry Ghanshyam, a man who comes from a good well settled family. Few conversations later she starts realising that he is not the man for her but knows that she cannot get out of the alliance just like that.It is in this s [...]


    3. It was a rediscovery of Shashi Deshpande whose works I used to read in college. I loved the central theme of this book i.e. marriage and the author's reflections on the same. Having said that, I wished a more detailed treatment of the plot. I somehow felt that the author lost interest in the plot midway and decided to end it quickly leaving the reader tad lost!


    4. An young woman/girl, carefree, high spirited and determined, baffled for her future after a discussion with her friends, enlightened with the thought that the best way to end the uncertainty of her future course of action (Higher studies/Career) is to get married, ’get that part of life over with’, get ‘settled’ and then deicide as per situations she went to her Aai and declared her wish to marry. The groom was searched, she inspected them and get inspected by them and soon got engaged t [...]


    5. The book is a commentary on the thought process of a newly graduated girl in middle-class India. She loves her family, but is a rebel with a big mouth. She is jealous of her beautiful elder sister and her perfect marriage, but cannot handle decline in her health and relationship with her husband. She wants to have a career, but is not sure which direction to take. She considers marriage to be a task that needs to be completed and get done with, and then finds herself unprepared for the expectati [...]


    6. Ships That Pass was a beautifully written book with a gripping story line! This story has got everything in it, emotions, intensity and mystery with well portrayed characters! It also throws light on relationships…the way they change with time. Radhika the main protagonist was really an appealing character…more like a girl next door whom we can easily relate to. I just could not put down this book until I finished it! I am so happy I discovered an author like Shashi Deshpande will definitely [...]


    7. Was happy to read Shashi Deshpande after a long timehad thoroughly enjoyed her works before, and this one too like her previous ones is highly enjoyable in style and sensitive in details. At times it seems a bit of a coming-of-age type story but as the story unfolds the reader's interest gets more captured by the author's take on uncertainty of life and the changing nature of most intimate relationships. But I must agree with the author's own comment in the preface that crime fiction is certainl [...]


    8. A mystery novel that goes deep into relationships that travels through marital discord and frustration ,but ends on a note of hope .Gripping read. Finished in two days straight while unfinished ones keep piling up on one side ."Ships that pass in the night ,and speak each other in passing,Only a signal shown and a distant voice in the darkness;So on ocean of life we pass and speak one another;Only a look and a voice ,then darkness again and a silence."-Tales of a Wayside Inn:The Theologian's Tal [...]


    9. nice novels made me to think abt marriage n radhika decide to get marry soon.e thought this the solution the problem bt ,,,its not its a beginning of problem,,,as she learned by her sister,,i just got married n i know what r changes u will get after married ,,,realy toataly changed ,,in a bad way and in a good way also


    10. An immensely mysterious and an haunting novel. It reinforces the fact that nothing is absolute, neither love nor death and above all else marriage. Was it a suicide? Was it a murder? Even after the book is over there are many possibilities.




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