The Servant Economy: Where America's Elite is Sending the Middle Class

The Servant Economy: Where America's Elite is Sending the Middle Class

Geoffrey P. Faux David Faber / Jul 22, 2019

The Servant Economy Where America s Elite is Sending the Middle Class Renowned economist Jeff Faux explains why neither party s leaders have a plan to remedy America s unemployment inequality or long economic slideAmerica s political and economic elite spent so long m

  • Title: The Servant Economy: Where America's Elite is Sending the Middle Class
  • Author: Geoffrey P. Faux David Faber
  • ISBN: 9780470182390
  • Page: 181
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Renowned economist Jeff Faux explains why neither party s leaders have a plan to remedy America s unemployment, inequality, or long economic slideAmerica s political and economic elite spent so long making such terrible decisions that they caused the collapse of 2008 So how can they continue down the same road The simple answer, that no in charge one wants to publicly acRenowned economist Jeff Faux explains why neither party s leaders have a plan to remedy America s unemployment, inequality, or long economic slideAmerica s political and economic elite spent so long making such terrible decisions that they caused the collapse of 2008 So how can they continue down the same road The simple answer, that no in charge one wants to publicly acknowledge because things are still pretty great for the people who run America It was an accident of history, Jeff Faux explains, that after World War II the U.S could afford a prosperous middle class, a dominant military, and a booming economic elite at the same time For the past three decades, all three have been competing, with the middle class always losing Soon the military will decline as well.The most plausible projections Faux explores foresee a future economy nearly devoid of production and exports, with the most profitable industries existing to solely to serve the wealthiest 1%The author s last book, The Global Class War, sold over 20,000 copies by correctly predicting the permanent decline of our debt burdened middle class at the hands of our off shoring executives, out of control financiers, and their friends in WashingtonSince his last book, Faux is repeatedly asked what either party will do to face these mounting crises After looking over actual policies, proposed plans, non partisan reports, and think tank papers, his astonishing conclusion of the same.

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    About "Geoffrey P. Faux David Faber"

      • Geoffrey P. Faux David Faber

        Geoffrey P. Faux David Faber Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Servant Economy: Where America's Elite is Sending the Middle Class book, this is one of the most wanted Geoffrey P. Faux David Faber author readers around the world.


    532 Comments

    1. If you are trying to avoid depressing fare, then don't open this book because it is not an optimistic read. On the other hand, if you want to walk into the future "eyes wide-open", brace yourself and plunge in. The author, founder of the Economic Policy Institute, makes his case relentlessly. He sets the stage by describing the period just after World War II and up to 1980 as an unusual period when a sort of cushion existed for the middle class. Sure, the "Greatest Generation" grew up during the [...]


    2. A very revealing summary of Reganomics and the current political and economic situation in the US. It further exposes the true goals of the Republican party, but not without throwing dirt in the faces of Democrats either -- something I've always wanted to see in a book on the subject. Quite pessimistic, overall, as it should be. We, as a country, are in a downward spiral, and the oligarchy is the driving turbine behind it. There are some things that would have been great, if included in this boo [...]


    3. Very thought provoking. Tells it true and like it is. The US is well on the way to 2nd world country status. With third world status waiting just around the corner. Life is already cheap. The vast majority of our population is sliding to poverty and servant status. We are back to dog-eat-dog competition and the devil can have the losers.


    4. This book explores the U.S.'s recent economic history and policy and how we got to where we are. Still entrenched in Reaganomics, the decline of the middle class was inevitable, but now will fall gradually, but surely toward the poverty line. Author Faux doesn't hold back and even goes after Obama, a transformational candidate, who became a transactional President like all his predecessors going back to Reagan.Published four and a half years ago (June 2012) at my reading (Jan 2017), the latter p [...]


    5. Although the author paints a depressing and seemingly hopeless case for a renewed economic future for the U.S this was still an eye opening book. "The Servant Economy" is written by a global economist who in 2006 predicted the recent economic crisis. As such, he has studied all the factors that relate to America's economic position in the world both past and present. I found the first part of the book which dealt with the history of economics in the U.S. to be fascinating. Not only is it interes [...]


    6. The book that I read is titled The Servant Economy: Where America's Elite is Sending the Middle Class by Geoffrey P. Faux. The author's purpose in writing this book is to explain how some policies that are going through government is helping the wealthy American's but in the process is causing the middle class workers to work more for less. He wants to reveal to everyone that reads his book that the 'haves' in America are hurting the 'have nots' by not having heftier taxes on all the money that [...]


    7. I picked up this book after hearing a segment of Jeff Faux's interview with Diane Rehm on NPR. He made some interesting statements about the state of the labor market and its impact on young career building people, so I thought the book he was promoting would contains some insightful thoughts on the economic problems our nation faces today. This book is actually much the opposite of insightful. It is a long political rant full of despair.The author gets on the soapbox from page 1 and does not st [...]


    8. Heard part of Diane Rehm interview:thedianerehmshow/shows/201Faux paints a very dreary picture of our economic future. As the income and capital gaps continue to widen between the ultra-rich and the lower classes, we must expect more disruption, not less. When we hear economic proposes for our future which have already failed in the past, I have to shudder. Faux reminds us that political "wooden-headedness" will always bring the same result.His chapter "Flickering Hope: Schools, Trade winds, and [...]


    9. Best non-fiction book I ever read. I don't read many books but it was so great you just have to read for yourself. Economics, History and Politics intertwined as Faux takes a look back through the decades of prosperity and lately highlights the reasons why America is on the decline when it comes to the global economy. Favorite chapter was highlighting the events that lead to the market crash and the crash itself. I don't even agree with some of it as he says Democrats will be better off running [...]


    10. Excellent book that covers the history of executive decisionmaking since FDR and its support or impact on the middle class. It exposes the fault in some preconceived notions on several presidents and their decisions and ties them together in a seamless stream of history to show how we got where we are. This should be required reading for those interested in public policy and how it affects, well, the public. There is a big difference between what gets sold and what gets bought. And we have bough [...]


    11. This was a fascinating book, well-researched. Grim predictions about where our country is headed but not hard to believe. The author is left-leaning but doesn't spare anyone. I saw a few typos which was somewhat annoying; they seemed to be the result of using spell-check. Also someone had made pencil marks in the book-argh!! I do recommend this to everyone. I think it's far less likely that anything will change unless Americans become more aware of what's really going on in our government.


    12. Most of the book is a decently-written summary of economic and fiscal policy in the New Deal and after. The actual stuff about the "servant economy" doesn't really come in until the end, as part of a parade of future horribles that actually seemed so hyperbolic as to detract from the points the author was trying to make. It was a decent read, but not something that anyone who has read Krugman or Stiglitz hasn't read before.


    13. As another review said, "Amazing and depressing." However, ignoring fundamental truths about what is happening to the United States at the hands of the top 1% and the multinats (abbr. for multi-nationals, a term often used in Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars trilogy) won't make things any better for us or our children.


    14. We all know the economy is in a rut. Faux tries to explain not only how we got there but what this will mean for the survivors. The future looks pretty bleak in these pages. At least as the author sees it, we've done this to ourselves.


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