Their Noble Lordships: How to Tell a Duke from an Earl... and other mysteries solved

Their Noble Lordships: How to Tell a Duke from an Earl... and other mysteries solved

Simon Winchester / May 27, 2019

Their Noble Lordships How to Tell a Duke from an Earl and other mysteries solved Winchester writes of the peculiarly English tradition of handing law making ability to people who have had the simple good fortune of being born into the right family He travels the height and breadth

  • Title: Their Noble Lordships: How to Tell a Duke from an Earl... and other mysteries solved
  • Author: Simon Winchester
  • ISBN: 2940013947429
  • Page: 346
  • Format: Nook
  • Winchester writes of the peculiarly English tradition of handing law making ability to people who have had the simple good fortune of being born into the right family He travels the height and breadth of the British Isles in search of many of these Lords, Earls, Dukes, Viscounts, and other titled peers Some are eccentric, many are generous, a few are resigned to their duWinchester writes of the peculiarly English tradition of handing law making ability to people who have had the simple good fortune of being born into the right family He travels the height and breadth of the British Isles in search of many of these Lords, Earls, Dukes, Viscounts, and other titled peers Some are eccentric, many are generous, a few are resigned to their duties, while one was even helped by his fellow upper class in the cover up of murder The book was actually challenged for publication by peers who did not want to be exposed while others championed the cause Winchester deftly explores the subject mining anecdotes such as the necessity for the ultra wealthy in Scotland to eat their porridge standing up and also to serve their cheese with a scoop rather than a knife.

    • â Their Noble Lordships: How to Tell a Duke from an Earl... and other mysteries solved || ë PDF Read by ☆ Simon Winchester
      346 Simon Winchester
    • thumbnail Title: â Their Noble Lordships: How to Tell a Duke from an Earl... and other mysteries solved || ë PDF Read by ☆ Simon Winchester
      Posted by:Simon Winchester
      Published :2018-011-03T21:48:18+00:00

    About "Simon Winchester"

      • Simon Winchester

        Simon Winchester, OBE, is a British writer, journalist and broadcaster who resides in the United States Through his career at The Guardian, Winchester covered numerous significant events including Bloody Sunday and the Watergate Scandal As an author, Simon Winchester has written or contributed to over a dozen nonfiction books and authored one novel, and his articles appear in several travel publications including Cond Nast Traveler, Smithsonian Magazine, and National Geographic In 1969, Winchester joined The Guardian, first as regional correspondent based in Newcastle upon Tyne, but was later assigned to be the Northern Ireland Correspondent Winchester s time in Northern Ireland placed him around several events of The Troubles, including the events of Bloody Sunday and the Belfast Hour of Terror.After leaving Northern Ireland in 1972, Winchester was briefly assigned to Calcutta before becoming The Guardian s American correspondent in Washington, D.C where Winchester covered news ranging from the end of Richard Nixon s administration to the start of Jimmy Carter s presidency In 1982, while working as the Chief Foreign Feature Writer for The Sunday Times, Winchester was on location for the invasion of the Falklands Islands by Argentine forces Suspected of being a spy, Winchester was held as a prisoner in Tierra del Fuego for three months.Winchester s first book, In Holy Terror, was published by Faber and Faber in 1975 The book drew heavily on his first hand experiences during the turmoils in Ulster In 1976, Winchester published his second book, American Heartbeat, which dealt with his personal travels through the American heartland Winchester s third book, Prison Diary, was a recounting of his imprisonment at Tierra del Fuego during the Falklands War and, as noted by Dr Jules Smith, is responsible for his rise to prominence in the United Kingdom Throughout the 1980s and most of the 1990s, Winchester produced several travel books, most of which dealt with Asian and Pacific locations including Korea, Hong Kong, and the Yangtze River.Winchester s first truly successful book was The Professor and the Madman 1998 , published by Penguin UK as The Surgeon of Crowthorne Telling the story of the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary, the book was a New York Times Best Seller, and Mel Gibson optioned the rights to a film version, likely to be directed by John Boorman.Though Winchester still writes travel books, he has repeated the narrative non fiction form he used in The Professor and the Madman several times, many of which ended in books placed on best sellers lists His 2001 book, The Map that Changed the World, focused on geologist William Smith and was Whichester s second New York Times best seller The year 2003 saw Winchester release another book on the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary, The Meaning of Everything, as well as the best selling Krakatoa The Day the World Exploded Winchester followed Krakatoa s volcano with San Francisco s 1906 earthquake in A Crack in the Edge of the World The Man Who Loved China 2008 retells the life of eccentric Cambridge scholar Joseph Needham, who helped to expose China to the western world Winchester s latest book, The Alice Behind Wonderland, was released March 11, 2011 source


    758 Comments

    1. This enjoyable and readable book would be of infinite use to Americans (and others) confused about the workings of the British peerage; however, having been written in the late 1970s, the information is out of date, especially with the passage of the House of Lords Act in 1999, which set in motion the abolition of hereditary peerages--or at least the amendment of the right of such peers to sit in the House of Lords. However, for the enthusiast of historical fiction set in the UK, it might help s [...]


    2. I feel like I've been reading this book since the beginning of time.This is not because it's bad.It's because it's old.This was published in 1984. Most of the information seems to halt around the lat '70s. While still good information about the various families, I found myself at nearly constantly checking up on the latest info.So then I would fall down the wormhole.An hour later, I would get back to what I was reading.The book makes a strong case that even in 1984, the House of Lords was just [...]


    3. What an unpleasant book. I admit that I was looking for a history with, perhaps, some insight into how the peerage have adapted to modern adjustments. And this simply is not at all that. So my disappointment was largely due to that fallen expectation. I also was looking forward to it because I'm an admirer of Winchester's other books, Krakatoa being a big favorite. But this was written when he was younger, and more driven by his own political agenda. In the forward, he mentions that many of the [...]



    4. I read the updated 2012 edition newly subtitled: How to tell a Duke from an Earl and other mysteries solved. Simon Winchester is such a good storyteller that I read this book even though I care very little about noble peers. As an American I do not understand why anyone should be "elevated" above others on account of birth. I was curious why the British buy into it all still. It all seemed archaic and irrelevant--helpful for understanding Jane Austen novels and Downton Abbey. Except that this T [...]


    5. This edition of Their Noble Lordships is a re-release written at the end of the 70s, and first published after threats of a law suit from the lordships in the 1980s.Written in Winchester's recognizable droll style, this book is not his best, though many of his loyal readers will enjoy it. It demystifies the British aristocracy and the role of the House of Lords in their parliamentary system.Winchester interviewed many Dukes, Earls, Viscounts, etc in his research and visited many of their stately [...]


    6. Even tho' the book is old (30 years), that fact alone tells you how profoundly entrenched the British class system is, since the writing is still shockingly relevant. The power exercised by the hereditary peers, perhaps not in legislation any longer, is very real and closely guarded. The dry-ness of some of the writing is well-balanced by some of the more unpleasant, unseemly anecdotes and also by a percentage of lordly interviewees who are more human and self-aware as to the randomness of their [...]


    7. Another gem, full of lines I'd like to steal.This book is ideal for a lover of obscure facts. Although the tone is clearly and convincingly anti-peerage, Winchester's observation that the vast majority of estates are well-managed and bereft of garishness and pollution, because the dukes et al. are concerned with their legacies, is the only argument I've ever read that advocates feudalism over capitalism (and makes a good point).


    8. It was an interesting journey through the English aristocracy. I still couldn't tell you the proper forms of address, and how the various courtesy titles are allocated. This was a tract critical of the nobility, but I don't see it as being that strong a statement. Perhaps it's my own detachment from the matter which has me think that. It was nice, but not terribly gripping.


    9. At 30 years old, its dated, but still an interesting look at the state of the peerage at the time. It provides an interesting bridge between the idea of the peer at the turn if the century-WWI-through the 1920's and the Lords reforms subsequent to this book. Very readable, but a bit tedious when he starts into long paragraphs of lists.


    10. Such a squiffy look at the British aristocracy, for those of you who are interested in the ramifications of the peerage, the complexity of the order of precedence and amusing accounts of the eccentrics who make Britain's peerage so utterly hilarious.



    11. Interesting read (especially for an american who hasn't had exposure to the whole english thing, other than through reading), but unfortunately very dated (data 30 years old).



    12. Fabulous information for a committed Anglophile. Getting the information is painful, however, because it is delivered as circuitously as possible.


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