Memory Mambo: A Novel

Memory Mambo: A Novel

Achy Obejas / Jun 16, 2019

Memory Mambo A Novel Achy Obejas a Cuban lesbian living in Chicago scored a huge hit with her collection of short stories We Came All the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This Now in Memory Mambo her first n

  • Title: Memory Mambo: A Novel
  • Author: Achy Obejas
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 432
  • Format: Audiobook
  • Achy Obejas, a Cuban lesbian living in Chicago, scored a huge hit with her 1994 collection of short stories, We Came All the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This Now in Memory Mambo, her first novel, she describes the life of Juani, a 25 year old Cuban lesbian who has to deal with family, work, love, sex, and the weirdness of North American culture Obejas s writingAchy Obejas, a Cuban lesbian living in Chicago, scored a huge hit with her 1994 collection of short stories, We Came All the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This Now in Memory Mambo, her first novel, she describes the life of Juani, a 25 year old Cuban lesbian who has to deal with family, work, love, sex, and the weirdness of North American culture Obejas s writing is sharp and mordantly funny She understands perfectly how the romance of exile from a homeland as well as from heterosexuality and the mundane reality of everyday life balance one another Memory Mambo is ultimately very moving in its depiction of what it means to find a new and finally safe sense of home.

    Memory Mambo A Novel Achy Memory Mambo describes the life of Juani Casas, a year old Cuban born American lesbian who manages her family s laundromat in Chicago while trying to cope with family, work, love, sex, and the weirdness of North American culture Achy Obejas s writing is sharp and mordantly funny. Memory Mambo by Achy Obejas Memory Mambo Memory Mambo describes the life of Juani Casas, a year old Cuban born American lesbian who manages her family s laundromat in Chicago while trying to cope with family, work, love, sex, and the weirdness of North American culture. Memory Mambo A Novel Kindle edition by Achy Obejas Memory Mambo describes the life of Juani Casas, a year old Cuban born American lesbian who manages her family s laundromat in Chicago while trying to cope with family, work, love, sex, and the weirdness of North American culture Achy Obejas s writing is sharp and mordantly funny. Memory Mambo A Novel PDF pdf download free books Memory Mambo describes the life of Juani Casas, a year old Cuban born American lesbian who manages her family s laundromat in Chicago while trying to cope with family, work, love, sex, and the weirdness of North American culture. MEMORY MAMBO Achy Obejas memory mambo Juani Casas is obsessed with memory Having escaped from Cuba to the United States with her irresistibly imperfect family, she is fixated on extracting the truth of her life from the nostalgic mythology of exile. Memory mambo a novel eBook, WorldCat Get this from a library Memory mambo a novel Achy Obejas A Cuban American s quest to learn the truth about her family Are the stories of their achievement in pre revolutionary Cuba true, or are they exaggerations or, worse, inventions A look at a problem Memory Mambo Cuban Memory, American Mobility, and In Memory Mambo , the first novel by Achy Obejas, Guantanamera serves as a governing metaphor for a Cuban family s rival accounts of displacement in the U.S.A For Nena, the sister Memory Mambo Audiobook Achy Obejas Audible Memory Mambo describes the life of Juani Casas, a year old Cuban born American lesbian who manages her family s laundromat in Chicago while trying to cope with family, work, love, sex, and the weirdness of North American culture. Memory Mambo Profiles Facebook People named Memory Mambo Find your friends on Facebook Log in or sign up for Facebook to connect with friends, family and people you know Log In or Sign Up See Photos Memory Mambo Memory Mlambo Mutare Polytechnic Studied at Mutare Memory Mambo A Novel YouTube May , Rodney Dangerfield Funniest Jokes Ever On The Johnny Carson Show online video cutter com Duration TheLazyCowOnUTube ,, views

    • Free Download [Chick Lit Book] ß Memory Mambo: A Novel - by Achy Obejas ¸
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      Posted by:Achy Obejas
      Published :2018-011-05T09:10:36+00:00

    About "Achy Obejas"

      • Achy Obejas

        Achy Obejas is the award winning author of Days of Awe, Memory Mambo and We Came all the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This Her poems, stories and essays have appeared in dozens of anthologies, including Akashic s Chicago Noir A long time contributor to the Chicago Tribune, she was part of the 2001 investigative team that earned a Pulitzer Prize for the series, Gateway to Gridlock Her articles have appeared in Vanity Fair, Village Voice, The Nation, Playboy, and MS, among others Currently, she is a music contributor to the Washington Post and the Sor Juana Writer in Residence at DePaul University in Chicago She was born in Havana


    467 Comments

    1. Of all the Caribbean literature I've read this term, it is this, this odd, disturbing, frustrating novel, which has had the greatest impact on me.I'd like to think that it isn't because I identify with the narrator; Juani Casas, twenty four years old, Cuban-American, lesbian, terminally incapable of taking a stand about anything in her life. Juani leads the reader through a tangled web of memory, family, politics and sexuality, paying attention to all the wrong things and striking out at those a [...]


    2. Obejas is a brilliant writer. This tale of life, love, friends, family, and potential for personal growth is powerful in theme, content, and style. It is rare to read a protagonist one finds difficult to like or hate, making the novel a compelling challenge. The conflict between the central lovers (lesbian) over politics, and how it robs them of connection is painful and vital. Race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexuality -- all are explored with care and complexity but without pity. I lov [...]


    3. The publisher calls this a novel, but I don't. I notice that the people who wrote the reviews and blurbs don't either: they call it "a work of fiction," "a collection," "writing," "a book." It reads like a set of linked memoir-ish essays. Interesting for its glimpses into life in Cuba and among Cuban exiles in the U.S.--and the Spanish glossary is much appreciated. Marginal queer content, at least by the point I quit on page 91.


    4. Obejas is a Chicago Cubana dyke writer who I was mildly obsessed with in college. She taught at U of C for a semester and my girlfriend took her class. We all became the kind of awkward buddies that happens when you want to chum around but there's an age gap and that whole student/teacher thing. But Memory Mambo is a Chicago book as much as any other kind of book (queer, Latina, etc) which makes me love it completely. Quick read, like on a lazy weekend in the winter.


    5. I know it's not hip to write a satisfying conclusion but I wouldn't have minded feeling satisfied after reading this book's conclusion other thoughts:-copy editing is almost cringe-worthy in its earnestness. ThinkMarch Madnessand "on-line."-Jimmy is not only irredeemably evil but also conveniently manages to stage all his evil acts in front of the main character, so we in the audience get to see them too. Nothing wrong with villains, but he was so unambiguously evil that it reached the point of [...]


    6. I want to read and like this book but I cannot get past the first few pages due to this:"My family and I came from Cuba to the US by boat when I was six years old." page 2 GOOD"There are hazy color snapshots of me from when we first arrived in the U.S a rubbery toddler in the arms of a sloe-eyed adolescent." page 5 NOT GOOD.And this book is about memory!!!


    7. about a cuban lesbian living in chicago, about adjusting to american culture, being a lesbian, exile, cuba . . . i read it in high school and really really liked it, a lot of strange events, and great stories about life in cuba.


    8. I read this because it was assigned in my daughter’s lit. class. It’s not something I would have ever read on my own, so I’m glad I read it in that respect, but otherwise? Not so much.The writing was first person, and I tend to like this. Unreliable narrator is even better and I think that’s a given here. Juani is telling her story and while doing so, examining just how our memories work. She has “memories” of things that happened in her family before she could possibly remember them [...]


    9. This was more the story of a family than a person. We moved backwards and forwards through time, exploring memory and truth. I'm glad I read it, but I'm not quite sure what to say about it, at least without spoiling the ending.


    10. I tried to like this book, but it never happened for me. I've read some other reviews, and it isn't that I disagree with their sentiments, I just don't extend them quite so far. I felt the writing very heavy handed (which I almost feel bad saying, the author is so respected). I'd like to cite the point where Nena and Juani are talking in Nena's place in Miami about memory:"Nena, everybody in our family's a liarI mean how do you wander through it all? How do you tell Bernie about our family? What [...]


    11. This novel's narrative is an incomplete attempt by the protagonist to put together the various stories of Cuba and exile that define her family (and the families of so many other Cuban exiles and Latin American immigrants) which are beset by inconsistencies, contradictions, grudges and secrets. It is a great example of the multi-vocal strains common to transnational American literature, working to make connections between the "homeland" and the diaspora.The novel is also notable for two things: [...]


    12. This book had me intrigued from the beginning. The main character Juani keeps her own personal matters to herself but is always there for her family. It’s one of the first books I’ve read that’s able to express a characters love for her family and also her own solitude within it. She walks the fine line between being true to herself but also withholding her natural instincts to touch her lover when she’s around; because that wouldn’t be expressing love but rather forcing her “lifesty [...]


    13. 1) That was messed up2) I'm sure it was very smart but3) can someone frickin explain what the hell was going on here because4) I have absolutely no fucking clueThis is one of those books where the form definitely reflects the content. Juani's quest to find the truth of her family's past and to untangle the web of memories and lies she considers her life is just as disjointed as the actual novel. The writing is jumbled and non-linear, but that actually mainly worked for me. I did wish there was a [...]


    14. Like many others, I found out about Obejas through a Cuban lit class where I was impressed by one of her short stories. So when I came across her novel on a remainder shelf, I decided to give it a chance. I have mixed feelings about this book -- much of the writing is very powerful, and it is definitely valuable to read of Juani's conflict with her Cuban heritage and how she and her family are perceived by others. However, I found that some of the more uncomfortable, even twisted visuals present [...]


    15. I read this novel in a Gender & Literature course at Michigan State. The course itself focuses on how gender, sexuality and race intersect and I believe Memory Mambo was a great book to have on the reading list. I was immediately drawn in by the energy of Juani's family. There were many stories and characters to keep track of, but I think this really gives the reader a picture of a large family composed of others besides blood relatives. The book grapples with sexual orientation and is consi [...]


    16. This book hooked me from the beginning. The main character keeps her own personal matters to herself but is always there for her family.Its rare that a writer can express a characters love for her family and also her own solitude within it. Juani out of respect for her family is withholding her natural instincts to touch her lover when she’s around; because that wouldn’t be expressing love but rather forcing her “lifestyle” on them. The story showcases her struggle as a Cuban exile and t [...]


    17. The book is this process of revelations - peeling away the accepted notions and social niceties to reveal the good (and the very, very bad) in people. The prose is approachable, without sacrificing any richness or complexity. The story settles into a rhythm that draws one along, making the reader a listener and forcing them to navigate a path through the place from which what compels us to do what we do comes from. A worthy, heart-wrenching and thought provoking read. Also, if anyone knows where [...]


    18. I kind of wish I hadn't finished this book. I really liked it when I first started reading it and then I couldn't read it for like 2 or 3 weeks and I sort of lost the thread of the story and the character's neuroses. It was kind of like Animal Dreams meets Greetings From Jamaica Wish You Were Queer. Lots of obsession with the accuracy of memory and familial history but I didn't think she pulled it off nearly as well as B Kingsolver does. Evertime I reread Animal Dreams I notice new things about [...]


    19. I love Obejas' writing particularly because her novels and short stories struggle with issues of identity. This book took me by surprise though with a few graphically violent passages. It definitely took me out of my protected bubble and made me realize that others' lives can be ridden with violence and contempt. I think it hit home even more because it's set in Chicago and I know the neighborhoods and places it referenced. She always brings up good questions about life, love and one's sense of [...]


    20. Just finished this novel--started it last night. That never happens! I loved the sub-theme regarding return to Cuba, wanting to go back to know why being a Cubana matters so much. I think this resonated more with me than anything I've ever read about being Greek!I am looking for reviews regarding its merit as a novel. I found it terribly fun to read, lots of things happening--but I imagine that many of the narrative choices would get reamed in a thesis defense


    21. This book was beautiful to me- themes that really resonated (memory, truth, the shiftiness of reality)and the occasional paragraph that one wants to committ to memory the words are so striking. Then the last few chapters she threw in a real dramatic twist and ended it in a somewhat sloppy way. I think I might have had the same complaint about another one of her books. In any event, I kinda couldn't put it down.


    22. I really enjoyed the insight into the family dynamics which are very different from my own family. It definitely shed some light on things I have observed and experienced in my current relationship.I was quite surprised by the events towards the end of the book - unsettling and not necessarily necessary - but I think I understand why the author chose to go there.


    23. A compelling story about a Cuban-American family, but the narrator's (Ruth Oakes) fast reading and lack of inflection seriously detracted from it. Better to read the print version yourself than listen to this one.


    24. A rare gem in Latin American literature, this book portrays the difficulty of being a lesbian in the Cuban culture--probably representative of other Latino cultures. One can get a true sense of the protagonist's struggle.


    25. I don't know how to talk about my feelings about this book. It imparted important information and perspective and was suddenly upsetting to read. It's very well written. It's a book my brain will keep poking at for a long time.


    26. I liked her writing style, the imagery, the way the non-linear writing style reflected the main characters efforts to underhand histories personal and historical. It may have tried to put too much into one book and the ending felt incomplete. But the rest was good enough to make up for it.


    27. Another superb novel by Achy Obejas about being a Cubana in Athe States,the extended family ties which are part of it, and being a Lesbian, which is not. If you're squeamish, be warned there are scenes of lesbian lovemaking.


    28. Honestly, I felt like the writing was rather empty. Where everyone else seems to see poignancy and emotion, I see attempts to fill an entire book with a story that was probably only about fifty pages long.


    29. So, so good. This book is definitely on my list of favorites now. It talks about so much, race, national identity, sexuality, and the subjectivity of memory. Definitely something I want to read again!


    30. though both of obejas's novels deal with very complicated characters with sometimes paradoxical desires and with the elusive lure of memories, i think "memory mambo" is a bit stronger because of the tangled relationship of the main characters.


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