Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life

Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life

Massimo Pigliucci / Jul 17, 2019

Answers for Aristotle How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life How should we live According to philosopher and biologist Massimo Pigliucci the greatest guidance to this essential question lies in combining the wisdom of centuries of philosophy with the latest

  • Title: Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life
  • Author: Massimo Pigliucci
  • ISBN: 9780465021383
  • Page: 124
  • Format: Hardcover
  • How should we live According to philosopher and biologist Massimo Pigliucci, the greatest guidance to this essential question lies in combining the wisdom of 24 centuries of philosophy with the latest research from 21st century science In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the bestHow should we live According to philosopher and biologist Massimo Pigliucci, the greatest guidance to this essential question lies in combining the wisdom of 24 centuries of philosophy with the latest research from 21st century science In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the best possible tool for understanding the world and ourselves As Aristotle knew, each mode of thought has the power to clarify the other science provides facts, and philosophy helps us reflect on the values with which to assess them But over the centuries, the two have become uncoupled, leaving us with questions about morality, love, friendship, justice, and politics that neither field could fully answer on its own Pigliucci argues that only by rejoining each other can modern science and philosophy reach their full potential, while we harness them to help us reach ours Pigliucci discusses such essential issues as how to tell right from wrong, the nature of love and friendship, and whether we can really ever know ourselves all in service of helping us find our path to the best possible life Combining the two most powerful intellectual traditions in history, Answers for Aristotle is a remarkable guide to discovering what really matters and why.

    Answers for Aristotle How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Sep , Answers for Aristotle is an entertaining and intelligent book that looks to combine science with philosophy to refine human behavior and eradicate or diminish our irrational side Pigliucci uses the most recent discoveries and studies in psychology to underscore his main message, while making significant use of Aristotle s timeless wisdom and Answers for Aristotle How Science and Answers for Aristotle How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life st Edition by Massimo Pigliucci Author Visit s Massimo Pigliucci Page Find all the books, read about the author, and See search results for this author Are you an author Answers for Aristotle How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Answers for Aristotle How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to a More Meaningful Life by Massimo Pigliucci in DJVU, EPUB, FB download e book. Answers for Aristotle how science and philosophy can In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the best possible tool for understanding the world As Aristotle knew, each mode of thought has the power to clarify the other science provides facts, and philosophy helps us reflect on the values with which to assess Rationally Speaking Answers for Aristotle response to Sep , But Answers for Aristotle is written from the point of view of virtue ethics, and ignorance is most definitely not a virtue, for Aristotle as well as for most of PHILOSOPHY ARISTOTLE HELP Yahoo Answers Jan , What, according to Aristotle, is the function of being human Why does he choose this function rather than another I know according to Aristotle the function of being human is an activity of soul in accordance with rational principle but why does he pick this function t find the answer Answers for Aristotle Massimo Pigliucci Answers for Aristotle is a veritable Cook s Tour of science, philosophy, and the curious meeting ground of the two The best approach, as the author intended, is to sit back in a quiet hour or two and take it all in, then look back afterward to behold the vast terrain you have covered. Answers For Aristotle by Massimo Pigliucci Issue Answers for Aristotle is a veritable Cook s Tour of science, philosophy, and the curious meeting ground of the two The best approach, as the author intended, is to sit back in a quiet hour or two and take it all in, then look back afterward to behold the vast terrain you have covered. Answers for Aristotle In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the best possible tool for understanding the world and ourselves As Aristotle knew, each mode of thought has the power to clarify the other science provides facts, and philosophy helps us reflect on the values with Aristotle Questions and Answers eNotes Aristotle Questions and Answers Discover the eNotes community of teachers, mentors and students just like you that can answer any question you might have on Aristotle

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    About "Massimo Pigliucci"

      • Massimo Pigliucci

        Massimo Pigliucci is the chair of the Department of Philosophy at CUNY Lehman College He is also the editor in chief for the journal Philosophy Theory in Biology He is an outspoken critic of creationism and advocate of science education.Pigliucci was born in Monrovia, Liberia, although he was raised in Rome, Italy He has a doctorate in genetics from the University of Ferrara, Italy, a Ph.D in bilogy from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D in philosophy of science from the University of Tennessee He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry.Pigliucci was formerly a professor of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University He explored phenotypic plasticity, genotype environment interactions, natural selection, and the constraints imposed on natural selection by the genetic and developmental makeup of organisms Early in his career, he received the prestigious Theodosius Dobzhansky Prize from the Society for the Study of Evolution As a philosopher, Pigliucci is interested in the structure and foundations of evolutionary theory, the relationship between science and philosophy, and the relationship between science and religion.Pigliucci writes regularly for Skeptical Inquirer on topics such as climate change denial He has also written for Philosophy Now and maintains a blog called Rationally Speaking He has debated deniers of evolution young earth creationists and intelligent design proponents , including young earth creationists Duane Gish and Kent Hovind and intelligent design proponents William Dembski and Jonathan Wells, on many occasions.Pigliucci is an atheist, and while he considers atheism a perfectly respectable metaphysical position, he believes that science does not necessarily demand atheism, because of the distinction between methodological and philosophical naturalism and the distinction between matters of fact and value judgments He believes that many scientists and science educators fail to appreciate these differences.Pigliucci serves on the board of NYC Skeptics and on the advisory board of the Secular Coalition for America He also co hosts its official podcast, Rationally Speaking, with Julia Galef.


    798 Comments

    1. Simply, the worst book dealing with philosophical issues I ever had the misfortune to come across. Pity that I could not give it zero stars - I tried but the software would not let me do it. At the beginning of the book, there are definitely some good and interesting points, but the overall level of philosophical depth is definitely more appropriate to a basic recipe popular philosophy book than to any even partially serious attempt to address philosophical questions in areas such as ethics and [...]


    2. I am not sure whether the "meaningful" in the title belongs there. More appropriate would be "flourishing", as author likes to translate the Greek word "eudaimonia". The book tries to show what philosophy (especially ethics) and modern science have to say about how to lead eudaimonic life. My only problem with the book is that it is a bit superficial - I am a reader of Massimo's blog and also a fan of his podcast and I have to say that I have learned very little new in addition to what I have he [...]


    3. One of the better books I read in 2012. As a long-time reader of Massimo's blog, I was keen to see his thoughts fleshed out more and I wasn't disappointed. The central idea is that while science is a wonderful, powerful tool for understanding the world, it's not enough -- contrary to currently-popular beliefs -- to circumscribe all possible knowledge. There are some things that science alone simply cannot and will not ever be able to tell us. Countering both the primacy of science as well as the [...]


    4. This book is an adequate pop science book and a terrible philosophy book. Most of it is devoted to relatively chatty and broad accounts of neuroscience and evolutionary biology/psychology, with scant attention paid to the framing device represented in the title. There are some interesting discussions of basic neuroscience. There are also sections where he catalogs "fascinating" and "elegant" psychology experiments, without giving you any detail at all about them! Overall, the approach is ridicul [...]


    5. I wish I'd picked up this book a few years ago, but that would have been before it was published. It would make an excellent primer for somebody interested but not yet well-versed in the modern relationship between philosophy and science. I don't think there's any question that the "sci-phi" approach, as Pigliucci calls it, is generally the most responsible method for understanding and responding to the pressing ethical issues of our time. I've listened to Pigliucci interviewed, and I have a lot [...]


    6. The first time I've ever heard the name "Massimo Pigliucci" was in debate about the limits of science featuring him alongside Lawrence Krauss, Daniel Dennet and Richard Dawkins. I admired the reasonable position he took during the debate that science cannot have answers to everything (due its nature) contrarily to Krauss who stated that science can actually explain everything even right or wrong and he considered them to be scientific quests.I googled the author and I found out that he has a PhD [...]


    7. The first few chapters I would have rated 5 stars, but it started to decline and the conclusion chapter tainted the entire book, as he kind of goes off the rails drawing big, broad conclusions that are huge leaps from the content presented in the book.


    8. The primary thesis of this book is that, in order for one to live a meaningful life in the broadest and best sense, one must use the best of science and the best of philosophy in order to understand the true nature of the world and how it matters to human well-being. Now, although my initial assessment of this book did not see it as such, my final assessment is that this is an excellent book with much valuable insight as to how humans ought to live as they try to make the most of their opportuni [...]


    9. Being both knowledgeable in philosophy and biology gives the author an edge in talking about things that less-endowed authors may butcher. And indeed, the scope of the book is vast. I would recommend any casual reader the book purely for its basic coverage of various topics related to morality and ethics between the fields of biology, psychology, and philosophy. The writing also flows more like a cool-guy professor and not heavy in "academic-ese" at all. That being said, I do warn readers that t [...]


    10. What is the best way to live? How do we discover it? What gives life meaning, and how do we find it? In this book, Professor Pigliucci proposes that we can answer these questions through Sci-Phi -- a mix of modern science and philosophy -- and that we need no mystical or supernatural solutions to them, only our own will to seek the wisdom of human experience and the best of our cutting-edge research, to help us on our way. Taking cues from Aristotle himself, the book lays out the latest findings [...]


    11. Massimo brings together ideas from his backgrounds in philosophy and science to tackle the question of how to live the good life. His tone throughout the book is casual and conversational, and the book reads like a chat over dinner. Listeners of Massimo's Rationally Speaking podcast will feel right at home.His argument is that we need to use both philosophy and science together in order to understand the world and ourselves. These two disciplines have become uncoupled over time, and I see a numb [...]


    12. This is a far-reaching book surveying what science and philosophy have to offer in creating and living a meaningful life, or one of eudaimonia as Aristotle would have it. Pigliucci examines the western philosophical tradition from the Greeks, through David Hume, Mill, Kant and Rawls, looks at what psychology, sociology and biology (especially the most recent cutting-edge research in neuro- and cognitive science and comes up an integrated view of what makes for a meaningful life. His conclusion r [...]


    13. Rather wide in scope, almost as if unfocused, although generally coherent. In this book Massimo Pigliucci promotes what he terms sci-phi -- or, in everyday words, "science-informed philosophy".I'm of two minds about this book. On one hand, I agree with author's proposition that science can -- and should -- inform philosophical discourses concerning law, ethics, etc. Surely advances in psychology, neuroscience, etc. can't be ignored in illuminating human nature.Yet on the other hand, Pigliucci's [...]


    14. "Answers for Aristotle" is an entertaining and intelligent book that looks to combine science with philosophy to refine human behavior and eradicate or diminish our irrational side. Pigliucci uses the most recent discoveries and studies in psychology to underscore his main message, while making significant use of Aristotle's timeless wisdom and insights.The book comes with the warning that if people are easily offended or narrow-minded, this is not their book. But for all those who seek general [...]


    15. This is a book to bend your mind around, and spend time to pounder and reflect upon the narrative. The book tackles ideas of rational, emotional and justice as well as deontology, consequentialism and virtue, all of which will give you space to meander aimlessly in your belief system. The book is well written and is clearly for the serious reader who is prepared to be asked uncomfortable questions about right, wrong, God and the supernatural. If you like to keep an open mind and challenge your t [...]


    16. An excellent introduction to the value of the confluence of ethical philosophy and cognitive science and psychology in the quest for the good life. Very engaging and written in a popular style while still providing adequate references. In some ways, this is a rejoinder to Sam Harris' "The Moral Plain" and offers and critiques his view that science can dictate human values as well as his assumption of utilitarianism as the premier ethical theory. I took off a star for the brevity of his treatment [...]


    17. Despite the title, this book is more about suggestions of directions to do further research and less about providing any kind of answers. The answers that are provided tend to lack supportive reasons, being put forth as assertions or via fallaciously denying the antecedent. The suggestions are nothing new, but if you haven't delved into the intersection of science and philosophy before, you may find this book a decent starting point.


    18. In the spirit of the Aristotelian idea of Eudaimonia, this book seeks to fuse insights from philosophy and recent developments in Science to question different aspects in life, to render life more meaningful. A great and accessible book indeed. Although its conclusions are open due to the uncertainties in Science and limits of our reasons, it embodies the spirit of philosophy - eager to learn and improve on oneself; the love of wisdom.


    19. A book which expanded my thoughts about the roles, capabilities, and limitations of both science and philosophy. (For example, I had never thought about the important application of the naturalistic fallacy.) I expected a bit more of an expansion on "living well" based on the blurb but was happy to have read the book anyway.


    20. Massimo manages to convey the importance of science and philosophy and the domains in which they operate. If you've not read much about how the brain learns and develops, this book is a good introduction to concepts.Unfortunately I've read a lot of the material on human learning and behavior that is cited by this book, so it's not much new. I did enjoy the first quarter, though.


    21. Some of the ideas and certainly the main concept of combing science and philosophy will already be familiar to readers of the rationally speaking blog. Especially the beginning was a bit slow. But the discussions later on were really illuminating. All in all a very well written book with a lot of food for thought


    22. An excellent introduction to the various ideas in both philosophy and science regarding the subjects that most people will consider to be most important in the pursuit of a 'good life': morality, knowledge,justice and love.


    23. I really liked the concept of this book, but the execution wasn't quite there. Pigliucci is a good writer but I don't think he put a lot of work into this book.






    24. One of the most thought-provoking books I've read in some time. I recommend this book for anyone interested in learning what Philosophy and Science have to teach us about the human condition.


    25. The author presents an interesting exploration of Important Questions, bringing together philosophical arguments and scientific research to inform the answers.


    26. So I'll admit to skimming much of this. I guess I'm not so much into neuro-biology. And the philosophy parts were interesting, but a little lightweight.


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