The Spine of the Continent: The Most Ambitious Wildlife Conservation Project Ever Undertaken

The Spine of the Continent: The Most Ambitious Wildlife Conservation Project Ever Undertaken

Mary Ellen Hannibal / May 20, 2019

The Spine of the Continent The Most Ambitious Wildlife Conservation Project Ever Undertaken As climate change encroaches animals and plants around the globe are having their habitats pulled out from under them At the same time human development has made islands out of even our largest natu

  • Title: The Spine of the Continent: The Most Ambitious Wildlife Conservation Project Ever Undertaken
  • Author: Mary Ellen Hannibal
  • ISBN: 9780762772148
  • Page: 259
  • Format: Hardcover
  • As climate change encroaches, animals and plants around the globe are having their habitats pulled out from under them At the same time, human development has made islands out of even our largest nature reserves, stranding the biodiversity that lives within them The Spine of the Continent introduces readers to the most ambitious conservation effort ever undertaken toAs climate change encroaches, animals and plants around the globe are having their habitats pulled out from under them At the same time, human development has made islands out of even our largest nature reserves, stranding the biodiversity that lives within them The Spine of the Continent introduces readers to the most ambitious conservation effort ever undertaken to create linked protected areas extending from the Yukon to Mexico, the entire length of North America This movement is the brainchild of Michael Soule, the founder of conservation biology and the peer of E.O Wilson and Paul Ehrlich, who endorse his effort as necessary to saving nature on our continent With blue ribbon scientific foundations, the Spine is yet a grassroots, cooperative effort among conservation activists NGOs large and small and regular citizens The Spine of the Continent is not only about making physical connections so that nature will persist it is about making connections between people and the land we call home In this fascinating, exciting, and important book, Mary Ellen Hannibal travels the length of the Spine, sharing stories and anecdotes about the passionate, idiosyncratic people she meets along the way and the critters they love.

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    About "Mary Ellen Hannibal"

      • Mary Ellen Hannibal

        Mary Ellen Hannibal Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Spine of the Continent: The Most Ambitious Wildlife Conservation Project Ever Undertaken book, this is one of the most wanted Mary Ellen Hannibal author readers around the world.


    759 Comments

    1. Somewhere between 3.5 and 4 stars. What works: the author does a good job of tracing the history of ecology, conservation biology, and connectivity - and explaining these fields in layman's terms. What doesn't work quite as well for me is somewhat related: so much territory is covered, particularly in terms of names (of scientists) and (their) projects, that focus is lost. Must admit that the latter may well have been, at least in part, a focus issue on my part, as I read the book in bits and pi [...]


    2. This book inspired me to get out and do something for the environment. I'll never be able to do scientiful activities that will help the wildlife and the land on which it lives, but there has to be something an amateur can do. I learned an enormous amount about the science behind saving animals and helping them deal with climate change. I also got a peek into the politics of the environment (not something that was unexpected). I give this a thumbs up - a scientific book that can be read and unde [...]


    3. In my following interview with Wildlands Network's Wildlands Connectionnewsletter, Hannibal discusses how her book was written to make nature protection a higher priority among North Americans and more to the Wildlands Network point, to help more people grasp the concepts of connectivity and wildlife corridors. Her book has already captured the attention of a wide range of conservationists -- new and experienced, deep and broad thinking."One afternoon I walk along the roaring Hyalite Creek throu [...]


    4. While the National Park system in North America has been around for a long time and been one of the great success stories of America, there are flaws that are becoming more apparent as continued climate change affects those environmental islands. But perhaps the most ambitious conservation effort ever undertaken looks to solve the biodiversity challenges and link the natural movements of nature all along the spine of the continent. MaryEllen Hannibal has managed to do something that is not easil [...]


    5. An okay read, but way too much filler for me. Title was a little misleading as the book only briefly touches on the actual "Spine of the Continent" project. The rest is background on general conservation and then specific examples of ecosystem dynamics. Overall message of the book was good, but the focus was not what I was expecting.


    6. I loved learning about the conservation efforts. Would have preferred less of the author's presence in her reporting


    7. I enjoyed this book as much as her one on citizen science--a concept we should hang on to /foster. Great books . . . . esp for nature lovers.


    8. Here we go, first time reviewing a book written by someone I know. Feeling the pressure a) not to be mean, but b) not to pull any punches. Onward.This book describe a current effort to link open space for the entire stretch of the Rocky Mountains, from the Yukon to the Yucatan. From beaver to bear to pronghorn to jaguar, wildlife of all stripes have historically used this enormous corridor as their home and their highway, some of them migrating thousands of miles to breed or simply find new terr [...]


    9. As a nature lover who lives in rural Vermont with scant knowledge of the West, I loved this book. It was such a treat for me to be educated while also being entertained – a real feat for a science writer. I'd never heard of such a thing as a "trophic cascade," for example, and truly enjoyed learning about it. And who knew beavers were so remarkably important for our environment?The Spine of the Continent has exactly the right tone, with an occasional light touch (referring to beavers at one po [...]


    10. The Spine of the Continent is an essential work. There are secrets revealed in this book that have the power to undo damage done to our planet. My review of The Spine was published in Terrain in April, 2014, I'm posting the first paragraph, please follow the link to read the restSince 1872, when Ulysses S. Grant signed the bill that made Yellowstone our first national park, our country has been proud of its public lands. But these islands of safe spaces aren’t enough for the species that inhab [...]


    11. While set in the context of the Spine of the Continent project, this book serves a broader purpose, which is an introduction to the often-misunderstood field of conservation biology. The first part lays the groundwork while parts two and three introduce specific projects within the Spine collaborative and all the issues they face. Hannibal writes in a personable and accessible style, unafraid to take a few detours along the way to consider an alternative viewpoint or dive deeper into philosophic [...]


    12. I have mixed emotions about this book. On the one hand it was extremely educational and opened my eyes to some new (to me) concepts about how we save our planet. On the other hand I often felt I was slogging through sections of the book with complex and difficult to grasp ideas. So, I would recommend the book for anyone who wants the latest information about how we keep species from extinction in the face of development and climate change. Just be aware that this is not exactly a "page-turner".


    13. An intriguing look at the personalities and intro to the science beyond biological connectivity / conservation and the importance of providing linkages for flora / fauna to navigate the human-made obstacles keeping them from their traditional ranges or allowing them to move to more appropriate locales in the face of global warming.Fairly well written and researched, yet personality / story driven to remain accessible to general audiences.


    14. I'm adding this book as "read," because indeed I have read it hundreds of times. I'm trying to push my baby out into the world of , and to put it on shelves like "Best nature" books and so forth, it has to be on my bookshelf, apparently. If anyone wants to correct me on this or guide me into this world, I'd appreciate it!


    15. Informative, but not hard to read. I plan on being a conservation biologist, and this book was great for me. Exciting, scary, sad, hopeful. I love how she interviewed so many people, who sometimes disagreed.


    16. A good introduction and overview for someone who is new to the topic. If you are already immersed in this there will be a lot of familiar stories.




    17. A good story spoiled by lack of control.Hannibal sets out to tell the tale of an audacious conservation plan: the preservation of a huge corridor of wilderness the length of the Rockies, from the Yukon to Mexico. Sounds fascinating, right?The only problem is, the story never takes off. She's too distracted. And so we get a mini bio of Michael Soule, the so-called grandfather of conservation biology. We get an extended riff on the history the fur trade and the importance of beavers to early Europ [...]


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