Love Medicine

Love Medicine

Louise Erdrich / Aug 21, 2019

Love Medicine Vibrant with mystery music and magic this moving saga of two Native American families the Kashpaws and the Lamartines reaches out from the printed page with an authenticity and emotion rarely matche

  • Title: Love Medicine
  • Author: Louise Erdrich
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 411
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Vibrant with mystery, music and magic, this moving saga of two Native American families the Kashpaws and the Lamartines reaches out from the printed page with an authenticity and emotion rarely matched in contemporary fiction From the powerful opening scene high spirited, hard drinking June Kashpaw s death in the snow of a North Dakota reservation Louise Erdrich sVibrant with mystery, music and magic, this moving saga of two Native American families the Kashpaws and the Lamartines reaches out from the printed page with an authenticity and emotion rarely matched in contemporary fiction From the powerful opening scene high spirited, hard drinking June Kashpaw s death in the snow of a North Dakota reservation Louise Erdrich s award winning story springs to raging life a multi generational portrait of new truths and secrets whose time has come, of those who left the Indian land and those who stayed behind, of strong men and women caught in an unforgettable drama of anger, desire and the healing power called LOVE MEDICINE.

    Love Medicine Newly Revised Edition P.S Louise Set on and around a North Dakota Ojibwe reservation, Love Medicine the first novel by bestselling, National Book Award winning author Louise Erdrich is the epic story about the intertwined fates of two families the Kashpaws and the Lamartines With astonishing virtuosity, each chapter draws on a range of voices to limn its tales Black humor mingles with magic, injustice bleeds into Love Medicine Love Medicine is Louise Erdrich s first novel, published in .Erdrich revised and expanded the novel for an edition issued in , and then revised it again for the edition The book explores years in the lives of a small group of Chippewa also known as Ojibwa or Anishinaabe living on an unnamed Ojibwe Reservation in North Dakota possibly based on the Turtle Mountain Indian Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich Love Medicine has , ratings and , reviews Brina said A member of the Chippewa and Obijwe tribes, Louise Erdrich has been a leading voice in Na Love Medicine Shmoop Use our free chapter by chapter summary and analysis of Love Medicine It helps middle and high school students understand Louise Erdrich s literary masterpiece. Love Medicine Summary eNotes Love Medicine is a series of tales many of them originally published independently which explore the ties of blood, knowledge, love, and mystery that link three generations of Chippewa people Love Medicine Study Guide GradeSaver Love Medicine Questions and Answers The Question and Answer section for Love Medicine is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich Fantastic Fiction The first book in Louise Erdrich s Native American series, which also includes The Beet Queen, Tracks, and The Bingo Palace, Love Medicine tells the story of two families the Kashpaws and the Lamartines.Now resequenced by the author with the addition of never before published chapters, this is a publishing event equivalent to the presentation of a new and definitive text. Love Medicine NEA Overview A novel in stories about passion, family, and the importance of cultural identity, Love Medicine examines the struggle to balance Native American tradition with the modern world.Using an eclectic range of comic and tragic voices, Louise Erdrich leads the reader through the interwoven lives of two Chippewa families living in North Dakota. Love Medicine Louise Erdrich Paperback HarperCollins US Set on and around a North Dakota Ojibwe reservation, Love Medicine the first novel by bestselling, National Book Award winning author Louise Erdrich is the epic story about the intertwined fates of two families the Kashpaws and the Lamartines With astonishing virtuosity, each chapter draws on a range of voices to limn its tales Black humor mingles with magic, injustice bleeds into Love Medicine Noa Love Medicine is Noa s th studio album, together with her long time musical collaborator, guitarist arranger and producer Gil Dor The title expresses Noa and Gil s belief that music, when it is made honestly and lovingly, is medicine for the soul This album showcases Noa s excellent songwriting and the rare beauty of her voice, both at their very best.

    • Best Download [Louise Erdrich] ✓ Love Medicine || [Memoir Book] PDF ✓
      411 Louise Erdrich
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Louise Erdrich] ✓ Love Medicine || [Memoir Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Louise Erdrich
      Published :2018-012-17T23:41:10+00:00

    About "Louise Erdrich"

      • Louise Erdrich

        Karen Louise Erdrich is a American author of novels, poetry, and children s books Her father is German American and mother is half Ojibwe and half French American She is an enrolled member of the Anishinaabe nation also known as Chippewa She is widely acclaimed as one of the most significant Native writers of the second wave of what critic Kenneth Lincoln has called the Native American Renaissance.For information, please see answers topic louise eFrom a book description Author Biography Louise Erdrich is one of the most gifted, prolific, and challenging of contemporary Native American novelists Born in 1954 in Little Falls, Minnesota, she grew up mostly in Wahpeton, North Dakota, where her parents taught at Bureau of Indian Affairs schools Her fiction reflects aspects of her mixed heritage German through her father, and French and Ojibwa through her mother She worked at various jobs, such as hoeing sugar beets, farm work, waitressing, short order cooking, lifeguarding, and construction work, before becoming a writer She attended the Johns Hopkins creative writing program and received fellowships at the McDowell Colony and the Yaddo Colony After she was named writer in residence at Dartmouth, she married professor Michael Dorris and raised several children, some of them adopted She and Michael became a picture book husband and wife writing team, though they wrote only one truly collaborative novel, The Crown of Columbus 1991.The Antelope Wife was published in 1998, not long after her separation from Michael and his subsequent suicide Some reviewers believed they saw in The Antelope Wife the anguish Erdrich must have felt as her marriage crumbled, but she has stated that she is unconscious of having mirrored any real life events.She is the author of four previous bestselling andaward winning novels, including Love Medicine The Beet Queen Tracks and The Bingo Palace She also has written two collections of poetry, Jacklight, and Baptism of Desire Her fiction has been honored by the National Book Critics Circle 1984 and The Los Angeles Times 1985 , and has been translated into fourteen languages Several of her short stories have been selected for O Henry awards and for inclusion in the annual Best American Short Story anthologies The Blue Jay s Dance, a memoir of motherhood, was her first nonfiction work, and her children s book, Grandmother s Pigeon, has been published by Hyperion Press She lives in Minnesota with her children, who help her run a small independent bookstore called The Birchbark.


    728 Comments

    1. A member of the Chippewa and Obijwe tribes, Louise Erdrich has been a leading voice in Native American literature for over thirty years. Determined to publish her first book before she turned thirty, Erdrich wrote Love Medicine at the age of twenty nine, and this debut novel won the National Critics Circle Book Award. Following the intricate web woven by the Kapshaw and Nanapush families over the course of fifty years, Erdrich creates real characters that tug on the heartstrings of human emotion [...]


    2. Sometimes the books I enjoy most are the ones I have the least to say about. And what can I add to Toni Morrison's comment that "the beauty of Love Medicine saves us from being completely devastated by its power"? Because reading this book is living, in sweetness and beauty and love, even when it tells terrible things.It's life and there are as may ways of looking at it as there are minds to see, but in so far as these folks have been and still are fighting for survival, not just of the individu [...]


    3. Her clothes were filled with safety pins and hidden tearsLast week I sat on the steps of a downtown pier, stalled in the summer sun, reading my 1989 paperback edition of Love Medicine. With its Washington Husky-purple cover and title blaring in giant Brittanic Bold white font, the book must have appeared to the uninitiated like a pulp romance. Little did they know it was one of the most significant works of American fiction published in the 1980s, by an author who has become a national literary [...]


    4. Erdrich's first and still best-known work (because it's the one most often taught) has become something of a model for the contemporary short-story cycle, with interconnected stories devoted to a variety of interrelated characters spanning three (almost four) generations. The strength here is less in story (which centers on a love triangle and its effect on family ties) or character (vivid as they may be, they're still devoted women and unreliable men) than in style. I wouldn't call it lyrical b [...]


    5. This is the short story collection (some call it a novel) that launches the community of characters Erdrich will revisit through another five (six?) books - a form that seems entirely her own. As she says in this "newly revised" edition: "Since writing Love Medicine, I have understood that I am writing one long book in which the main chapters are also books titled Tracks, Four Souls, The Bingo Palace, The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse and The Painted Drum."One of the things I lo [...]


    6. I recently read Erdrich's The Antelope Wife and really fucking loved it. I am now planning on reading everything by Erdrich I can - luckily for me she has written quite a bit over the years, so I can take my time and maybe not even run out of material.Love Medicine was her first novel, published in the mid-80s. This one, I understand, was revised and expanded at least a couple times since it's original publication date. One might think that must be hard to do, and I think in a traditional novel [...]


    7. This is such a great book.It's also a very difficult one to read because it pulls no punches about the Native American experience. In this book you will read about grindingly cruel experiences, the drudgery of daily life, alcoholism and suffering, in-fighting and rivalry that lasts generations. Erdrich tells us about her characters in small stories, each centred around a different character. Sometimes we read about the same event in different stories, told from different perspectives or perhaps [...]


    8. "Love Medicine" is a multigenerational novel about two interrelated families living on a North Dakota reservation from the 1930s to the 1980s. It's written as a series of 18 interlocked stories that often tell about the same situation from a second character's point of view. Native American myths and tricksters color the stories. The author uses wonderful imagery involving water, fire, bridges, and religion. The characters are very conflicted, hanging on to old traditions while living in a moder [...]


    9. A remarkable report from Chippewa country. I finally get Erdrich in a way that The Round House, with all of its successes, failed to grab me. I have read from many Erdrich fans how she's an author whose books they read over and over; I am not a big re-reader, even of my favorite books—I re-read passages and lines, and a cherished favorite once in a blue moon, but there's so little time and too many books—but while reading this, I understood her fans' (and I can now count myself as one of the [...]


    10. If you find yourself back in the 1990s and in a college course called "Native American women authors," you should definitely read this book. All other people, including time-travelers, should skip it.


    11. So many things in the world have happened before. But it's like they never did. Every new thing that happens to a person, it's a first In that night I felt expansion, as if the world was branching out in shoots and growing faster than the eye could see. I felt smallness, how the earthy divided into bits and kept dividing. I felt the stars. I felt them roosting on my shoulders with his hand. The moon came up red and warm.I first read this book in a Native American lit college course in 2000 and m [...]


    12. The novel is set largely on a Chippewa reservation in North Dakota, with brief forays to the Twin Cities. There is a family tree at the beginning of the book--refer to it as you read. This is essentially the story of two linked multi-generational families. The speaker shifts from chapter to chapter, as does the point in the time-line. Now we have the voice of a young student going home to visit her grandparents and worrying about her cousin, now the voice of that grandmother still a young woman, [...]


    13. This book actually earns six stars for the passage near the end about being "in love with the whole world and all that lived in its rainy arms."I read this book because I remember that my grandmother loved it and I'm trying to read all of her favorite books. What if you could read all the same books that someone else read in their lifetime, in the same order, at the same age?


    14. I loved this collection of interlocking stories, each featuring members of two related Chippewa families over three generations in the 20th century. Alcoholism, domestic violence, fierce loyalty, shredded dreams, endurance, the incredible strength of the human spirit are among the themes explored with sensitivity and beautiful insight. Erdrich captures the complexity of the relationships with amazing nuance. Even though we are introduced to a large cast of characters, Erdrich paints each so vivi [...]


    15. I got this book title off a lifetime reading list. I'm wishing I hadn't read it in my lifetime. Besides dropping the "F-Bomb" throughout the book, the story was pretty much a depressing chronicle of being drunk or sleeping with anyone but your spouse. (Thank goodness the descriptions were not explicit.) Plus, it is told from numerous points of view, not necessarily in chronological order. I found it confusing, and actually kind of taxing to remember who was who and how they related. The other pr [...]


    16. I am rounding up to 3 stars because this isn’t a terrible book, but I can’t claim to have enjoyed it. Love Medicine is a somewhat awkward merger between novel and short story collection, made up of 17 pieces about two families living on the Ojibwe/Chippewa reservation over the span of about 50 years, from the 1930s to the 1980s. I call it an awkward merger because the stories all feature the same group of characters, but there’s neither the overarching plot you want from a novel nor the ne [...]


    17. Louise Erdrich's 1984 debut is one of those novels that's not so much a novel as a collection of related short stories, like Manhattan Transfer, Last Exit to Brooklyn and Visit From the Goon Squad. These are not my favorite things; they're hard to engage with. As far as it goes, though, it doesn't get much better than Love Medicine. It's written with total authority - impressive for a debut - and the stories feel of a whole. It follows two Native American families, the Lamartines and the Kashpaw [...]


    18. I read "Love Medicine" as an anthologized short story twice before I finally picked up the entire book. "Love Medicine" is one of the three most moving short stories I've ever read. Lipsha Morrissey's voice, his eye on the world, his confidence in his gift to heal, and . . . well, this implies the wrong metaphor, but his faith in the midst of suffering, his longing to connect to his own history despite its knotted-ness makes him a vivid and resonant character. Don't we all have screwed up famili [...]


    19. Rob says:If you haven't treated yourself to the storytelling of Louise Erdrich, this is a great place to start. Her characters are beautiful, tragic, fun and flawed. Sometimes all in the same person! Her subsequent works develop many of the people introduced in Love Medicine. Lots of great reading to be had!


    20. I have now read six of Louise Erdrich’s novels, including her most recent book The Round House. This novel, Love Medicine was the author’s first major novel, released in 1984. Ironically, the novel might be confusing for readers who have not read some of the more recent books, since Love Medicine introduces many characters, each of whom has such a complicated relationship to the other characters that the author provides a full-page chart of the interlocking family trees. The narrative then t [...]


    21. To write a novel, start with a good short story. Then, write another. Then, another. Recycle your characters, put them all together, and you have a novel. Yes, I'm being glib. Actually, I'm a big fan of Louise Erdrich's work. She transitioned from poetry to short stories into novels, and while the transition was not seamless, it was, and still is, a journey and a growth the reader can experience with her. Her early novels do read like short story collections with the imagistic intesity of poetry [...]


    22. Love Medicine is a novel set in and around an Ojibwe reservation in South Dakota. It consists of a number of vignettes and stories about various members of two families on the reservation, the Kashpaws and the Nanapush/Lamartines, whose lives are interwoven in various ways. It is remarkably well written, particularly considering that this was Erdrich's first novel. She writes a number of different characters, with very distinct voices, each sounding distinct and authentic. And the writing is bea [...]


    23. This a yearning tapestry novel. The various stories, or chapters, focus on different characters and often deal with overlapping events told from different points of view. like the title suggests, if you let this book and its fascinating characters into your heart, you'll find yourself healed in some way. If you read this book keep in mind a couple of things while you're moving from paragraph to paragraph and page to page: how often colors are mentioned and in what context as well who they're ass [...]


    24. In Love Medicine, Erdrich weaves together two multi-generational Chippewa family histories. Each member of the family has their say in the family history and tell of abandonment, hopelessness, loss, but also friendship and, as the title suggests, love. In a lot of ways this novel de-mythologizes Native Americans in that many Native American novels portray their life as somewhat utopian--Native Americans as having a mythological reliance upon nature and connection to the land--which in a way dehu [...]


    25. Probably the best selection I´ve read so far from ¨2015: The Year of Reading Women¨. I didn´t realize it was a novel-I thought that they were merely short stories with intertwining characters, the way García Márquez recycles his. I was mistaken, and discovered it only once I was well into the novel. Because of this, if I were to re-read it, I´d do so when I had more free time. There are a lot of affairs and intermarrying between the two families, and I honestly found it harder to as time [...]



    26. Before I had yet read Karen Manuelito’s examination of the intersection of interests between indigenous “womanisms,” highlighting particularly the commonalities between the experiences of African American and American Indian women, I noted the similarities between the emphases on female experience in Morrison’s Beloved and Erdrich’s Love Medicine. It’s not by accident that Morrison’s is one of the strongest voices in the chorus of praise on the back cover of the novel, noting that [...]


    27. It took a couple of pages before I liked it, but once I was gripped by the story, it did not let me go until the very last page. Erdrich has a wonderful writing style, it is simple yet poetic. Reading this was an absolute breeze. There are a lot of characters in this book, and if the family tree in front of the book did not scare you at first (Really, I got Wuthering Heights flashbacks), you will be baffled by the amount of relationships and links these people have with each other. I often had t [...]


    28. There may be some treasure in this book but you have to dig through too much verbiage that is just not interesting to find it. I quit. I do not recommend this book.


    29. This book felt like walking into a small town and, over the course of years, sitting weekly for a long cup of tea with the oldest matriarch there who tells you, bit by bit, the stories of the people who live there. In that way, it took a while for the pieces to come together in the book. At first, the stories felt slightly disjointed, and I wanted some omniscient narrator to jump out of the book and say, "Listen, this is what's up between these two characters, and this is what happened with that [...]


    Leave a Reply