The Sugar Girls: Tales of Hardship, Love and Happiness in TateLyle’s East End

The Sugar Girls: Tales of Hardship, Love and Happiness in TateLyle’s East End

Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi / Aug 22, 2019

The Sugar Girls Tales of Hardship Love and Happiness in TateLyle s East End Delightful a terrific piece of nonfiction storytelling and an authoritative and highly readable work of social history which brings vividly to life a fascinating part of East End life before it is l

  • Title: The Sugar Girls: Tales of Hardship, Love and Happiness in TateLyle’s East End
  • Author: Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi
  • ISBN: 9780007448470
  • Page: 443
  • Format: Paperback
  • Delightful, a terrific piece of nonfiction storytelling, and an authoritative and highly readable work of social history which brings vividly to life a fascinating part of East End life before it is lost forever Melanie McGrath, author of Silvertown and Hopping On an autumn day in 1944, Ethel Alleyne walked the short distance from her house to Tate Lyle s refine Delightful, a terrific piece of nonfiction storytelling, and an authoritative and highly readable work of social history which brings vividly to life a fascinating part of East End life before it is lost forever Melanie McGrath, author of Silvertown and Hopping On an autumn day in 1944, Ethel Alleyne walked the short distance from her house to Tate Lyle s refinery on the shining curve of the Thames Looking up at the giant gates, Ethel felt like she had been preparing for this moment all her life She smoothed down her frizzy hair, scraped a bit of dirt off the corner of her shoe and strode through.She was quite unprepared for the sight that met her eyes In the years leading up to and after the Second World War thousands of women left school at fourteen to work in the bustling factories of London s East End Despite long hours, hard and often hazardous work, factory life afforded exciting opportunities for independence, friendship and romance Of all the factories that lined the docks, it was at Tate and Lyle s where you could earn the most generous wages and enjoy the best social life, and it was here where The Sugar Girls worked.Through the Blitz and on through the years of rationing The Sugar Girls kept Britain sweet The work was back breakingly hard, but Tate Lyle was than just a factory, it was a community, a calling, a place of love and support and an uproarious, tribal part of the East End From young Ethel to love worn Lillian, irrepressible Gladys to Miss Smith who tries to keep a workforce of flirtatious young men and women on the straight and narrow, this is an evocative, moving story of hunger, hardship and happiness.Tales of adversity, resilience and youthful high spirits are woven together to provide a moving insight into a lost way of life, as well as a timeless testament to the experience of being young and female.For information, pictures and audio clips, as well as the Sugar Girls blog, visit thesugargirls

    The Sugar Girls is a book by Duncan Barrett and Nuala Calvi, telling true stories of female workers at Tate Lyle s East End factories in the s to s Published by Collins March , . The Sugar Girls The Sugar Girls Duncan Barrett, Nuala Calvi The Sugar Girls Collins, weaves together tales of adversity, resilience and youthful high spirits, bringing vividly to life the East End of Call The Midwife and Silvertown It provides a moving insight into a lost way of life, as well as a timeless testament to the experience of being young and female. The Sugar Girls The_Sugar_Girls Twitter The Sugar Girls The_Sugar_Girls Sunday Times bestseller and Daily Mail Book of the Week telling true stories of Tate Lyle s East End factories Authors Duncan Nuala tweet. The Sugar Girls Home Facebook The Sugar Girls speaking at the Newham Show See All Posts The Sugar Girls added an event January at AM THU, MAR AT PM UTC Book Talk at The Hook Hook Library Chessington, United Kingdom people interested The Sugar Girls added an event January at AM TUE, MAR AT PM UTC. Customer reviews The Sugar Girls Fascinating Highly recommended The lives of girls who worked for a sugar company in England The history of the time just after World War Two was riveting Each girl was unique and each life interesting Great non fiction. The Cure Sugar Girl YouTube Mar , Sugar Girl B Side of Just Like Heaven Join The Dots A Sweet Song Lyric Oh I wish I could Find it Funny You Laughing like That But instead I change into a Rage And Run around Whitout a If Girls Are Sugar and Spice, What are Little Boys Made of Sugar and spice and all things nice This short version of the children s poem is commonly found in Mother Goose nursery rhyme collections What Is the Whole Poem of Girls Are Made of Sugar The Sugar Girls Tales of Hardship, Love and Happiness in The Sugar Girls Tales of Hardship, Love and Happiness in Tate Lyle s East End From young Ethel to love worn Lilian, irrepressible Gladys to Miss Smith who tries to keep a workforce of flirtatious young men and women on the straight and narrow, this is an evocative, moving story of The Archies Sugar, Sugar Original Music Video Dec , Sugar, Sugar is one of animated music segments created to be shown on The Archie Comedy Hour on CBS TV in , and the song is included on The Archies nd album, Everything s Archie

    • [PDF] Download ☆ The Sugar Girls: Tales of Hardship, Love and Happiness in TateLyle’s East End | by À Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi
      443 Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ The Sugar Girls: Tales of Hardship, Love and Happiness in TateLyle’s East End | by À Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi
      Posted by:Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi
      Published :2018-011-07T20:33:55+00:00

    About "Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi"

      • Duncan Barrett Nuala Calvi

        Duncan grew up in London and read English at Jesus College, Cambridge He is the editor of Ronald Skirth s First World War memoir The Reluctant Tommy Macmillan, 2010 and co author of Star Trek The Human Frontier Polity, 2000 and Zippy and Me The Remarkable Life in Puppets of Rainbow s Ronnie Le Drew forthcoming, 2011 He also works as an actor and occasional theatre director.


    491 Comments

    1. This goes together with Jennifer Worth's Call the Midwife series. It's non-medical, not so well-written, and, as you might imagine, quite sweet. What this book seriously lacks is any kind of reflection or insight into the mostly poor, definitely uneducated East End girls' lives. It's very much a 'she got dressed and went to work' and 'she said to the girl next to her' and 'later they went out to buy clothes to wear to the dance' where they inevitably met some boys and either got pregnant, got en [...]


    2. 3.5 Ever since reading the Midwive's series, I have taken a great liking to these kind of books. A group of women, who at various times had worked for the sugar factory. Book explains how easy it was to get employment, a far cry from current times, a woman could start one job in the morning, decide she didn't like it and get a different job by the afternon. A good series, highlighting the many sociological and personal prejudices of the forties and fifties. One girl is forced to give up her chil [...]


    3. 'The nervous 14-year-old who had stood outside the gates of the factory had gone. Ethel was a sugar girl now.'This lovely book gives us an insider view into the world of women working at Tate & Lyle's factories in the East End of London during the twentieth century.In particular, it focuses on the stories of four women, Ethel, Lillian, Gladys and Joan, delivering their memories and thoughts about the time they spent working hard at the factories, how their days were filled, how their lives w [...]


    4. The preface gives the reader a brief background of the two refineries. The employment conditions of the times and also the changes in modern Silvertown are also briefly touched on.The reader is then introduced to Ethel, Lilian and Gladys whose families all have similar social backgrounds and later on we get to meet Joan whose family have a different perspective of finances.Their stories are narrated in chapters of their own and the language is such that you can imagine the women themselves shari [...]


    5. THis book follows the lives of four "sugar girls" both inside and outside the factory and is an excellent character study as well as an inside look into life during WW2 London. Each chapter centers on a different girl so I had to frequently look back to remind myself who was who but otherwise the stories flowed nicely.I don't like to read books with bad language and unfortunately I had to keep a pen nearby with this book as there were several words I blacked out (at least two F words). For this [...]


    6. Really liked this book - the characters and their stories are endearing, touching and strong. It's getting a little tricky to remember who's who now - I think they should have stuck to a chapter per person rather than revisiting the characters on rotation, but it's still a really great mix of character study and historical reference.Is this why our communities have gone, killed with the death of companies like Tate & Lyle? Pay the Highest pay, have your own sports teams, run days out, privat [...]


    7. Although this was an interesting piece of social history, I found that it didn't quite work for me. I found the writing style a touch pedestrian, and the book didn't quite have that spark that makes good social history stand out.


    8. I should have seen the red flags from a reviewer's comment on the the back cover "If it doesn't become a TV series to rival 'Call the Midwife' ". Surprisingly designated as a non-fiction book, I found it no more than a soap opera aimed at a teenager reader. The first 50 pages were more than enough for me.


    9. Quite engaging, written in an easily readable style, and you really got to know the women featured. Enjoyable.


    10. A book about the women who worked at the huge Tate and Lyle sugar factories in Silvertown London, about their experiences and antics at work, their home backgrounds and their love lives, ending with a epilogue of how these spirited young women look back on their lives as elderly ladies. What I found tricky was the jumping from one person's story to another, without any reference to dates! A map is provided, a timeline would have been useful! One thing that struck me throughout was that, apart fr [...]


    11. Similar to "Call the Midwives" this book follows the lives of girls starting at the age of 14 working in the factories in East End Londonwouldn't be surprised if they make this into a TV mini series as well. Well written, gives you a real taste of what life was like back then.


    12. I decided to read this one because it's sort of in the same vein as Call the Midwife, true stories of poor and working class women in England after WWII. This one follows several "sugar girls" who worked at Tate & Lyle's sugar factory in London's East End from their teenage years up until their marriages. It's sweet but it lacked substance, to me. It's a lot of stories about what happened, who went where, etc, and not a lot of reflection on society or anything of that nature. That's not nece [...]


    13. This is a wonderful story. It could have been about the women who worked in any of the factories in my home town in southern Ontarioe glass factory, sugar beet factory, Libbies, Wallaceburg Brass. Ordinary lives were lived with sadness, joy, laughter, sorrow, hardship, shame.every possible emotion that we all feel on any given day. Ethel, Gladys, Lilian, Joan -- a good read


    14. I had a really hard time following this book. It was a story about 4 different girls whose lives didn't cross paths much - I would have preferred if it were broken into 4 smaller books, instead of every 4th chapter coming back to the same person. It is written well in terms of writing skills, not organization of the overall book.


    15. . If you are looking for social commentary or a class analysis you won't find it in this book. It tells the real stories of four real women working at Tate's and Lyles post second war and briefly exploring the home front war experiences they had prior. You have to draw your own political analysis or of course you can read them as stories at face value.I gave this the full five stories because they chime with the stories my grandparents told. The worker on the Hesser floor who told the 14 year ol [...]


    16. I enjoyed the book. It was a fresh perspective on the WWII era. I felt like I got to know the ladies. It was a fun insight into their lives at the height of Tate and Lyle. My only complainant was how the book read. I wish it didn't jump from one girl to the next. In the beginning I had a really hard time keeping everyone straight and had to re-read a few sections at the end of the book because I had it mixed up in my mind. I would just get into the one of the ladies and the chapter would end and [...]


    17. I thoroughly enjoyed this book - I didn't even realise until I'd finished reading it that it was written from interviews with the actual main characters but that just made it all the more enjoyable because it was all true. It really captured the spirit and energy of the East End towards the end of the War and the post-War years. My mum worked in the Birds Custard factory in Birmingham during that period and from what she's said it would appear that Tate & Lyle was quite similar in the way it [...]


    18. This is a great book if you are after a social history, as the details of the lives of the people at the Tate & Lyle sugar factory, both their living and working conditions, is very well documented. In alternating chapters, the book primarily outlines the lives of three of the "sugar girls,' mostly covering the post-war years of the early 1950's. I would like to have given it more than 3 stars, due to the enormous amount of detail the writers have included, but sadly for me the stories lacke [...]


    19. This book is based around 4 young girls who got jobs at the Tate & Lyle factory in the East End of London. It follows how their lives changed throughout the course of their working lives. I sympathised a lot with Joan who has to do something very difficult and I disliked Gladys a lot. The only think I'd criticise was the fact that towards the end Ethel's chapters tended to be more about other people than herself, other than that it was a very interesting read about the sugar girls of the 194 [...]


    20. [Audiobook version]Another surprisingly enjoyable find! (I get my audiobooks from the library, whose selection of non-fiction audio is limited -- and I'm beginning to run out of titles that appeal to me.)I liked the mix of characters, especially knowing these are true stories about real people, and thought there was a good mix of humour, drama, sadness -- and good old East End pluck. (Can I just say, Old Fat Nell and Little Lil were HILARIOUS.)If you like Call The Midwife, you'll probably like t [...]


    21. I enjoyed reading The Sugar Girls. But as Ethel, Gladys, Lilian and Joan’s generation was just one before my own, I was able to recognise much of what was happening in their lives. I think this made it more of a cosy, easy read and took away any surprise, ‘wow’ factor. The social history element of the narrative was fascinating and a reminder of how much things have changed for women in the workplace and in many other ways over the last 50 years. (Just as a matter of interest, I found The [...]


    22. This book ended up on my desk at work and I read it. It was a quick read telling the stories of several girls living in London's East End and working in the Tate and Lyle Sugar Factory. You got an idea of work opportunities for girls at this time period who were not able to get much education or who weren't considered particularly school smart.I was rating it in our collection for sex, profanity and violence and thought it would be lighter in those areas than it was. Heavy profanity and some vio [...]


    23. Really enjoyed this book which tells us some history of the Tate & Lisle families and the girls who worked in the factories. I really enjoyed reading about the history of the company as well as how life was in the fourties and fiftiesal eye opener!Would recommend this to anyone as you can't help wanting to know more about the ladies and their lives. Shed a tear or two and smiled to myself all the way through.Thoroughly good read!


    24. I enjoyed this book, another tale of World War II times from the viewpoint of some English women who went to work in a sugar factory.It was interesting to see the effects of war in ones own country and how it effected the women of that country. The author did a good job of entertwining the lives of his characters. Characters were easy to like and be inerested in. I always like an epilogueis book has a good one!


    25. An interesting study of working life at the Tate & Lyle factory in London's East End in the 1940s and 1950s. In this version the stories of the different women are all divided up and interspersed with each other, which did become a little confusing at times. However, the individual stories are also sold separately which probably would have made for an easier read. It was still a good book though.


    26. Reading this it feels quite remarkable that everything described in the book by the four main Sugar Girl characters is living memory (if even only just:). East End has changed so much Ethel, Gladys, Joan, and Lilian give us a glimpse into the factories of Tate and Lyle and the lives of factory girls during and after WWII. The website associated with the book has some photos of the women as well as some of the surroundings and events mentioned which is also very interesting.


    27. This is a very engaging social history book, which takes the stories of four women as a focal point and weaves in snippets of other people's lives and memories in a very readable narrative. Worth a read - especially for young women who don't realise how much life has changed for them since the fifties!


    28. TrueStoryInteresting story about the lives and careers of women working at Lyle and Tate. A sugar packaging factory on the docks in London's East End. Every chapter gives us a peek as the teenagers make lifelong friends, grow up, Very well written, brings you into the factory with them.


    29. A really enjoyable read, full of real people and real life experiences - showcasing how well Tate & Lyles looked after their staff, something modern companies would be well advised to try out to develop the loyalty and hard work ethic needed to maximise profits in these impoverished times! Sometimes sad, sometimes salacious, it was funny, heartwarming and well written too


    30. The authors researched and had nice eye witnesses to the factory worker kids lives, which went from pre WWll to the '80's. Several women team to bag factory sugar, can syrup and survive lean years. Some find love, some are abandoned but they tend to overcome bleak circumstances through stolid sensibility. Historically eye opening to womens' issues.


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