The Prussian Officer

The Prussian Officer

D.H. Lawrence / Jun 17, 2019

The Prussian Officer David Herbert Richards Lawrence September March was an English novelist poet playwright essayist literary critic and painter who published as D H Lawrence His collected works repres

  • Title: The Prussian Officer
  • Author: D.H. Lawrence
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 376
  • Format: Paperback
  • David Herbert Richards Lawrence 11 September 1885 2 March 1930 was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D H Lawrence His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitalitDavid Herbert Richards Lawrence 11 September 1885 2 March 1930 was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D H Lawrence His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitality, spontaneity, and instinct.

    • ✓ The Prussian Officer || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ D.H. Lawrence
      376 D.H. Lawrence
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ The Prussian Officer || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ D.H. Lawrence
      Posted by:D.H. Lawrence
      Published :2018-010-15T09:09:10+00:00

    About "D.H. Lawrence"

      • D.H. Lawrence

        David Herbert Richards Lawrence was an English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism and personal letters His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialisation In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitality, spontaneity, human sexuality and instinct.Lawrence s opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution, censorship, and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second half of his life, much of which he spent in a voluntary exile he called his savage pilgrimage At the time of his death, his public reputation was that of a pornographer who had wasted his considerable talents E M Forster, in an obituary notice, challenged this widely held view, describing him as the greatest imaginative novelist of our generation Later, the influential Cambridge critic F R Leavis championed both his artistic integrity and his moral seriousness, placing much of Lawrence s fiction within the canonical great tradition of the English novel He is now generally valued as a visionary thinker and a significant representative of modernism in English literature.enpedia wiki D.H._Law


    266 Comments

    1. “Gradually the officer had become aware of his servant's young, vigorous, unconscious presence about him. He could not get away from the sense of the youth's person, while he was in attendance. It was like a warm flame upon the older man's tense, rigid body, that had become almost unliving, fixed. There was something so free and self-contained about him, and something in the young fellow's movement, that made the officer aware of him. And this irritated the Prussian. He did not choose to be to [...]


    2. I do not know why the editor of the anthology where I found this story says that D. H. Lawrence "shows here a prophetic insight into the roots of the perverse cruelty that flourished later under the Nazis." There is a palpable sexual tension here, at the beginning, between the Prussian officer (a Captain) and his young orderly so unless the editor is saying that Nazism was borned out of a cruelly repressed homosexuality of key Nazi leaders, I'd say that reading historical meaning into this is a [...]


    3. I find ‘The Prussian Officer’ as an example of the creativity and insightfulness of D. H. Lawrence. In this work he showed a great understanding of psychoanalysis and the role of the defensive mechanism of the self, particularly the role of repression. The disturbing homoerotic impulses the Prussian office felt toward his orderly, paired with his sadistic tendency were very creatively and clearly depicted by the great novelist. The inner conflict between fulfilling his urges and his unaccept [...]


    4. Astonishingly good. This is very early Lawrence, and it's easy to see how he got slated for the hit and miss quality of some of his earlier work, but whilst these works aren't the finished article in the rich vein of Women in Love, or even Sons and Lovers, they are without doubt masterpieces in their own right.I feel that Lawrence struggles with endings, and nowhere is this more apparent than in The Prussian Officer. It's as though he had wrestled with his demons and got it out of his system, an [...]


    5. I chose to read this famous short story by D H Lawrence as it was mentioned in my writing group as containing a classic example of "unverbing" . The story has all the tension and relational intensity one expects from Lawrence as well as hints of homoeroticism. Like Doestoevesky Lawrence discusses how the act of killing places the individual outside of society and although the world continues to turn, the sun to rise and wild life to carelessly exist the perpetrator has by his act cut himself off [...]


    6. This was my second reading of the short story: THE PRUSSIAN OFFICER, about a tyrannical Captain, who becomes obsessed with a young orderly, and begins inexplicably bullying and abusing the poor soldier. As expected, it does not end well for either character. It just so happens that I watched the movie UNBROKEN, based on the book by Laura Hillenbrand, where the protagonist is victimized by a cruel and violent POW camp guard Mutsuhiro Watanabe, this same weekend.




    7. The title story and one thereafter left me a bit cold to be quite honest D.H. crammed them full of sentiment, description, and anxiety, but their clenched atmosphere never relented and so lost its force quickly, plus both were of a theme. Then again, all of the stories in this collection certainly share thematic concerns, setting, and sentiment. The others just do a better job.'Daughters of the Vicar' was a fine short story and everything after that point was smooth reading. I suppose I could go [...]


    8. Chocou-me um pouco este livro. E não encontrei o cenário o idílico de " O amante de Lady Chattelery", que tinha adorado. Este pelo contrário não me conquistou. Até considero pervertido. Um livro que retrata a relação entre senhor e servo. Demonstrando a violência e os desejos reprimidos de certos oficiais. Neste caso um oficial prussiano que possui uma obsessão por um soldado. Não compreendi foi a natureza dos sentimentos do servo. Uma vez que Lawrence retrata melhor o oficial, que ac [...]


    9. One of the Great Books of the Western World, this story didn’t do anything for me.Beautifully written, tension right to the end, nevertheless, when it came to the end end, I felt it was much to do about nothing.The last line ‘The bodies of the two men lay together, side by side, in the mortuary, the one white and slender, but laid rigidly at rest, the other looking as if every moment it must rouse into life again, so young and unused, from a slumber’can be, and probably has been analysed t [...]


    10. The only reason why I'm not giving this a 5/5 is because the story felt a bit monotonous in some places. It's divided into four chapters, with the last one being the most poignant, and succinct. The first three chapters are longer and describes the relation between the officer and the orderly in great detail. That is where the monotony came in.Save that, it makes for an excellent read. Lawrence's knack for including the finest of details makes the text very touching.


    11. Internal human frailties laid bare in the way that only Lawrence can do. Not all of the stories rate among his best works, but you cannot miss some early moments of genius which he practised in these stories, and then perfected in his novels. Not likely to convert any new to his writing, but a must for any existing Lawrence fans.


    12. Fairly average. The Thorn in the Flesh was the one exception. It found greatness. Daughters of the Vicar was my second favorite. I think I am going to take Lawrence out of my rotation. After three books, I feel I have gotten an accurate impression of him, and I don’t feel drawn to reading more.



    13. I learned today that I actually like D. H. Lawrence. I don't know why people make him out to be a reincarnation of Marquis de Sade, because they are nothing alike. D. H Lawrence, though sensual, relies on subtly -- unlike the Marquis whose body of work can be charitably described as distasteful and ribald.




    Leave a Reply